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Full text of "Radio Today (Jan-Dec 1937)"

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COPYRIGHT DEPOSIT 



Scanned from the collections of 
The Library of Congress 



AUDIO-VISUAL CONSERVATION 
at The UBRARY of CONGRESS 








Packard Campus 

for Audio Visual Conservation 

www.loc.gov/avconservation 

Motion Picture and Television Reading Room 
www.loc.gov/rr/mopic 

Recorded Sound Reference Center 
www.loc.gov/rr/record 




i 



» 



▲ 





JANUARY 
1937 



iTATISTICAL AND MARKETING NUMBE| 







The Story Behind the Salel 

NBC Network Programs — more thrillhig than ever 
before— are already increasing fine set sales for i^jjl 



THIS YEAR, we are delivering bigger 
and brighter NBC programs than at 
any other time in the history of broad- 
casting. And you know, as hundreds of 
alert dealers know, what this cah mean 
in the sales of the better sets. 

All-star Shows Mean All-star Sales 
Our Blue and Red Network schedules, 
already in effect, are studded with Talent 
— the finest entertainment that money can 
buy. Tune them in on demonstrations... 
talk them up with prospects. They'll 



put forth their most persuasive efforts 
in helping you sell the better sets. Re- 
member this — 

The interests of NBC are closely linked 
with you — the 15,000 dealers who con- 
tact and sell four to five million listeners 
a year. Use NBC Programs to demon- 
strate — they are the story behind many 
a fine set sale! 

RCA presents the Metropolitan Opera every Saturday 
afternoon. And "Magic Key of RCA" every Sunday 2 to 
3 P. M., E. S. T. Both on NBC Blue Network. 



A Radio Corporation of America Service 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY 

NEW YORK . WASHINGTON . CHICAGO • SAN FRANCISCO 



«7 



► 




THE COMPLETE 



t 




SIMPLEX^-^^*>«^937 



a//eti. 



. . . everything any jobber 
or dealer could want 

Smashing values are represented not only in the 5 LEADERS illus- 
trated below but in the complete 1937 SIMPLEX Line of the table 
models and consoles. 

Every SIMPLEX receiver is a leader in its price class — sensational in 
performance, modern, beautifully styled from the one band T.R.F, 
model to the I I -tube, all-wave Superhet. 2, 6 or 32 volt models 
at proportionate prices. All models available for 2,000 meters — 220 
volt AC or AC-DC. 

Under the NEW 1937 SIMPLEX JOBBER POLICY territories are 
absolutely protected because DISTRIBUTOR FRANCHISES are 
restricted to established Jobbers In large trade centers. Big profits, 
too, are assured through liberal Distributor Discounts. 

Extensive programs of National Advertising & Radio Broadcasting 
will create tremendous demands for SIMPLEX Receivers. Are you 
ready to cash in on the BIG BUSINESS that's already started to 
pour In for SIMPLEX JOBBERS and DEALERS? 

Write, wire or phone for details of territories available, prices and 
discounts. 



THE SIMPLEX RADIO CO. 

. . . . FACTORY SANDUSKY, OHIO 



$36.95 

9 Tube Super; 
3 Band 



$49-95 

II Tube Super; 
3 Band 





RADIO TODAY, January, 1937, Vol. Ill', No. 1, published monthly by C'aldwell-ClL^mtnts, Inc., 480 Lexington Ave., New York, N. Y. Subscription 
yearly $1.00 in U. S. and Latin American countries; $1.25 in Canada; $3.00 all other ceijiitries; single copy, 15c. Enterf/d as second-class matter July 24, 
1935, at the post office at New York, N. Y., under the Act. of March 3, 1879. Printed in U. S. A. Copyright /l937 by CaldwellOements, Inc. 



Index to advertisements on page 63. 



NOW! Afa^ic %ce 

in RCA Victor 1937 Auto Radio Une! 



• Cash in I Push these new 
sets with great sales features 
. . . Magic Voice, Finger-Tip 
Control, Escutcheon Plates for 
1934, '35, '36 and '37 cars. A 
unique merchandising plan and 
aggressive, compelling promo- 
tional advertising will help you. 



•"1 




RCA Victor's 1937 automobile radios are made to 
order for easy and profitable selling by yoii! They 
bear radio's greatest name. They offer many features 
for finer performance. They are backed by a new, 
sales-inspiring merchandising plan! 

Features? The famous RCA Victor Magic Voice 
makes its initial auto radio appearance — providing 
tone never before equalled in cars. Finger-tip con- 
trol of everything. Escutcheon plates to match 1934, 
'35, '36, and '37 models. Tv^^o audio amplification 
stages. 9 watts output. And still others! For beauty, 
performance and tone — they're magnificent! And 
their low prices are an extra appeal that mean 



• 1937 RCA Victor Auto Radio escutcheon plates and controls to match 
instrument panel for cars, 1934 through 1937. Also available for steering 
post and under-dash mounting. 
Tone and volume controls on left knob; tuning control and local-distant 

switch on right— for Magic 
Vnice Models 67M-2 and 
67M-3. 




• RCA Victor Magic Voice Model 67M-2 . . . 8-inch Magic Voice speaker, 
6 tubes and Powertron. 9 warts output, 2 audio stages. Tone control and 
local-distant switch on control panel. 

• RCA Victor Magic Voice Deluxe Model 67M-3 ■ . . 8-inch Magic Voice 
speaker, with auxiliary overhead speaker and three-way switch to select 
eitheror both speakers, 6 tubes and Powertron, 9 watts output, 2 audiostages. 



extra sales! Order your stock now. Feature these 
superb new sets. Push them at every opportunity. 
Cash in on real auto radio value! 



• (Bt/SM/RCA Victor Model 
67M-1 ... 6 tubes and Powertron, 
2 audio stages, 9 watts output, 
built-in speaker, connections for 
extra l overhead) speaker if desired. 





• .-lisi«,RCAVictorModeI67M 
.. .6 tubes, 3y2 watts output. Out- 
standing performance at lo-wprice. 



RCA presents the Metropolitan Opera eveiy Saturday afternoon 

and "The Magic Key of RCA" every Sunday 2 to ^ P. M., 

E. S. T. Both via NBC Blue Network. 



^^ 1/l£c&t AUTO RADIO 

RCA MANUFACTURING COMPANY, INC., CAMDEN, N. J. 

A Service of the Radio Corporation of America 

.'" -■'• Radio Today 



.IN THE 
FARM MARKtT WITH 



tf^C^gCfff 



HERE ARE A FEW OF 
THE EXTRAS YOU GET 
AT NO EXTRA COST 
WHEN YOU TIE UP 
WITH WINCHARGER! 



1. NATIONAL ADVERTISING 
CAMPAIGN— with circulation run- 
ning into the millions ! Powerful con- 
sumer messages that forcefully point 
out the ad\"antages of the new 6-volt 
farm radios and urge the consumer 
to come into \-our store for a demon- 
stration. You see at the right two of 
the ads which are appearing right 
now in the biggest national farm 
magazines. 

2. FOLLOW-UP PLAN that keeps 
on furnishing you with live pros- 
pects in your community'. We send 
our literature with \ our name printed 
on it to these prospects, to draw 
them into your store and make it 
easy for you to SELL them. 

3. YOUR RADIO MANUFAC- 
TURER carries the Wincharger 
stor>- in his advertising. To get the 
most out of \our manufacturer's ad- 
vertising and our big co-operative 
campaign, vou must use WIN- 
CHARGER. 

WHY EXPERIMENT? 

There are ten times as many genuine W 
chargers in a^e ts ail other makes combined 
More than .'iOO.OOO people are now enjoying 
finest modern radio reception through Win- 
charger^in every state in the Union — and 
in over 100 foreign countries. 

These leading radio manufacturers kno' 
the difference. They insist on genuine Win- 
chargers for best performance: 

Admiral Patterson 

Arvin Phiico 

Belmont RCA-Victor 

Crosley Sentinel 

Emerson Sparton 

Fada Stewart-Warner 

Fairbanks-Morse Stromberg-Carlson 

General Electric United American 

Grunow Bosch 

Kadette Westinghouse 

L'Tatro Zenith 

SPECIAL TEST OFFER 
To Authorized Dealers 

If you are an authorized dealer for one of 
the radios listed above, we want you to 
make this test: Order a genuine Wincharger, 
using the coupon at right. Compare it with 
any other charger on the market. Stand it 
alongside competing makes on your Hoor, 
and LET YOUR CUSTOMERS DECIDE 
which one gives the most for tlie money! 
If they fail tn choose ^^ incharger. return it 
to us and GET YOUR MONt^ BACK! 




E DELUXE MODEL 37 



rOeLUXE 




NO OTHER WIND-DRIVEN 
GENERATOR CAN OFFER ALL 
THESE FEATURES! 

1— Famous Albers Airfoil 
Propeller, pronounced 20'; to 
50' 'f more efficient b\' leading 
radio manufacturers. Proved by 
conclusive wind tunnel tests. 

2 — Copper Tips and Copper 
Sheathing, with 3 coats of 
weatherproof varnish, prevent 
propeller damage from weather. 

3 — Positive Acting Auto-Type 
Brake. When you stop Win- 
charger, it stays stopped. No 
complicated tip-up devices or 
swinging tail vanes. 
4 — Sturdy Ball Bearing Turn- 
table. Easy turning. 
5 — Double-Brush Collector 
Ring gets all the electricity. No loss due to using iron 
tower for one conductor — very important at 6 volts. 
6 — Heavy Four- Leg Angle-Iron Tower of 's" .x 1" x 
1" rails. Costs more than sheet steel, and worth it! 
7 — instrument Panel comes complete with ammeter 
showing charge and discharge. Positive-acting relay cuts 
batter\- off when propeller speed drops too low. 
8— Famous Wincharger Generator— weighs 24 
pounds. Made b\- world's largest generator manufac- 
turer specially for Wincharger use. Not an auto gen- 
erator. Uses third-brush principle to prevent excessive 
charging rate. Oil-sealed bearings never need oiling. Air 
cooled for increased efficiency. 
9 — Condenser to eliminate radio interference. 
10 — Patented Speed Governor operates by centrif- 
ugal force, the only recognized method for controlling 
speed. Acts as flywheel to maintain constant output in 
any wind up to 20 m.p.h. In high wind, flaps swing 
out. spilling air away from propeller. Safe in a hurricane! 
11— Special Fins on Governor Arms aid in starting 
at low wind velocity, give extra efficiency. 
12 — Extra Braces on Tower Feet. 

WINCHARGER CORPORATION, Sioux City, Iowa 



U orU's Largest Mcken ../ \Viii,l-Dr. 



I Genertitiiii^ Mac 




WINCHARGER CORPORATION, Sioux City, Iowa RT 1-37 

I am an authorized radio dealer. 

{stale make) 

My distributor is 

(dislTtbutoT's tiame) 

Distributor's City ..\ 

I enclose $15.00 for a Genuine Wincharger, accord'ing to your 
MONEY RACK -SPECIAL TEST OFFER. Please ship itat once. 

This Fifteen Dollar price applies in United States only. 

Name _ _ _ _ „ 

State :. 



Citx. — 




BRINGS BETTER PROFIT FROM RADIO SALES 



EMPLOYMENT IS UP . . . wages 
are increased, bonuses are paid. 
Millions who have been sitting tight 
for several years no^v have the confi- 
dence and determination to gratify 
their needs and their desires. 

This wdll be a big year for radio, 
bigger than the average year for 
the dealer who finances his time 
payment sales through Commercial 
Credit Company. Buyers appreciate 
the fair terms and low cost of Com- 
mercial Credit Company financing 



and have confidence in the reliability 
of this nationally known institution. 

Commercial Credit Company finan- 
cing wdll not only make more sales, 
but will protect you against loss from 
bad sales. Ttventy-five years' experi- 
ence assures a smooth-M^orking credit 
investigation and collection system, 
leaves you free to concentrate on sales. 

Offices in 168 leading cities in the 
United States and Canada provide 
prompt, close and reliable co-opera- 
tion in every case. 



COMMERCIAL CREDIT COMPANY 



COMMERCIAL BANKERS 
CONSOLIDATED CAPITAL 




HEADQUARTERS: BALTIMORE 
AND SURPLUS $60,000,000 



FINANCING SERVICE FOR MANUFACTURERS, DISTRIBUTORS AND DEALERS THROUGH 178 OFFICES IN THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA 



Radio Today 



COLORADIO SERIES 



at gP- ™ 

SERIES 254 FOR AC CURRENT 

5 TUBE SUPERHETERODYNE 

FEATURING METAL TUBES 

AND BEAM POWER TUBE 

Tht Most Pouerjul Smalt Sit Made 

CHASSIS FEATURES: 7 tube performance; Illuminated 
airplane dial calibrated in KC; Frequency range 535 to 1750 
KC; Beam power output tube; Automatic overload control; 
Built-in antenna; I. F. Frequency 456 KC; Acoustically fitted 
dynamic speaker; Operates on 115 volts, 60 cycles. AC. 

254W: WALNUT BAKEIITE CABINET $22.95 

254D: BLACK BAKELITE WITH CHROMIUM . . 24.95 

254V: PURE IVORY CABINET 24.95 

254R: PURE CHINESE RED CABINET 24.95 

254BG: BLACK BAKELITE AND GOLD 24.95 

254G: IVORY AND GOLD 26.95 

254RG: CHINESE RED WITH GOLD 26.95 

Prices ijichtdc full tube equipment 
MODEL 254T IN WALNUT WOOD CABINET WITH 
IDENTICAL CHASSIS FEATURES .... $24.95 



FADA BATTERY COLORADIO 

FOR THE FARM 

SERIES 242 - 4 TUBE SUPERHETERODYNE 
OPERATES FROM 2 VOLT AIR CELL 

CHASSIS FEATURES: 8 tube performance; 9 tuned cir- 
cuits; Tunes American, Short Wave ar.d Police Broadcasts; 
Frequency range 535-1750 KC and 2.2-6:9 MC; Illuminated 
airplane dial calibrated m KC and MC; Tone control; Phono- 
jack; Rubber mounted tuning condensers; 6 in. permanent 
magnet dynamic speaker; I. F. Frequency 456 KC; Automatic 
volume control; Air cell drain only .4 amps. 

242W: WALNUT BAKELITE CABINET $31.50 

242D: BLACK BAKEIITE AND CHROMIUM . . . 36.50 

242V: PURE IVORY CABINET 36.50 

242R; PURE CHINESE RED CABINET 36.50 

242BG: BLACK BAKELITE AND GOLD 36.50 

242RG: CHINESE RED AND GOLD 41.50 

242G: IVORY AND GOLD 41.50 

Prices include full tube iqtiipneiit 

SERIES 246 - 4 TUBE SUPERHETERODYNE 
OPERATES FROM 6 VOLT STORAGE BATTERY 

CHASSIS FEATURES: Identical vi-ith Series 242 excepting 
special bmlt-in "B" Eliminator and synchronous vibrator for 
power supply from 6 volt storage battery. Drain, onlyl.45amps. 

246W: WALNUT BAKELITE CABINET $36.50 

246D: BLACK BAKELITE CABINET 41.S0 

246V: PURE IVORY CABINET 41.50 

246R: PURE CHINESE RED CABINET 41.50 

246BG: BLACK BAKELITE AND GOLD 41.50 

246RG: CHINESE RED AND GOLD 46.50 

246G: IVORY AND GOLD 46.50 

Prices iKcludt full tube rquipmerit 
i«Hl $cri« oMalnaUe in Walnut Wood CabineH, Compact t Consols Models. 



FOR12 PROFITABLE 
MONTHS IN 1937 




FEATURED IN 7 DISTINCTIVE SERIES 
IN 8 MAGNIFICENT COLOR COMBINATIONS 



and priced as low as 






19 



99 



complete 



One of the oldest and surest devices used to command attention is the appeal 
of color. Color glorifies . . . Color is stimulating to the eye . . . Color creates 
the desire to buy. The appeal of color proves a strong selling ally because it 
is a "plus" feature. Color in radio is not new . . . but Coloradio by Fada is! 
Every Coloradio series possesses not only the appeal of color but also the nev/ 
"Streamline" cabinet designs which blend with the majestic color combina- 
tions. No other small set line combines so many selling features to offer the 
consumer . . . Color . . . Streamline . . . Design . . . Performance . . . Value. 

ATTRACTIVE COLORADIO DISPLAY NOW AVAILABLE 

A new display designed for the new Fada Coloradio Series is available to all dealers. 

SUEDE ZIPPER CARRYING CASES FOR ALL MODELS 

Suede Zipper carrying bags for every Coloradio series are featured for as little as $2.50 

FADA RADIO & ELECTRIC COMPANY 

LONG ISLAND CITY. N. Y. 



January, 1937 




T"l ERE'S a window or floor display 
-*--*■ ... in full colors . . . that sells 
Automatic Tuning as never before! 
It gives a constant demonstration . . . 
it shows how Automatic Timing works, 
by actual motion and illumination! 

Down goes the girl's arm . . . the 
dial revolves to the Automatic Tuning 
position . . . and flash! the words, 
''Click . . . there's your station!" light 
up on the dial. And your own local 
call letters appear on the dial, always 
brightly illuminated! The cut-out 
words, "PHILCO AUTOMATIC TUN- 



ING", at the top of the display, are 
also illuminated ! 

This life-size display has every- 
thing for quick-selling appeal . . . 
ACTION, COLOR and ILLUMINA- 
TION! And it comes to you FREE 
. . . ready to pull-in high-unit sales, 
week after week! 

If you haven't yet received full 
details on how to get this free display, 
get in touch with your Philco distribu- 
tor NOW! Be ready for the biggest 
radio business in history . . . cash-in 
with Philco Automatic Tuning in 
1937! 



PHILCO RADIO & TELEVISION CORPORATION 



Radio Today 



FEB -3 1937 



©CIB 325947 Z f^ 



Staff— 

Darrell Babtee 
Randall R, Ir\\ rx 
M. H. Newton 
B. V. Spinetta 
Vinton K. L'lrtch 



Lee Robinson 

Sales Manager 



RADIO 
TODAY 



Orestes H. Caldwell 
Editor 

M. Clements 
Publisher 

Copyright 1937 

Caldwell-Clements, Inc. 

-ISO Lexington Ave. 

New York City 

Tel. PLaza 3-13-10 



Vol. III. No. 1 



BOUNCING BILLINGS 

* With tlie Federal excise tax 
figures for 1936 showing an increase 
of 51 per cent over 1935, when radio- 
set sales numbered 6,000,000 sets, it 
becomes increasingly apparent that 
1936 was at least an 8,000,000-set 
year, although basic license-bureau 
figures for the final quarter are not 
yet available. 

At 8,000,000 sets, 1936 in unit pro- 
duction is thus 82 per cent ahead of 
America's business-peak year of 1929, 
when unit radio production was 4.- 
400,000 sets. Measured in dollar vol- 
ume, owing to the lower unit prices 
in 1936, 1936 radio volume is 25 per 
cent below the $600,000,000 retail 
peak of 1929. 

RADIO PARTS TRADE SHOW, 
CHICAGO, JUNE 10-13 

* Replacing the two Spring trade 
shows previously announced, the 
RaJio Parts Manufacturers National 
Trade Show will be held at the Ste- 
vens Hotel, Chicago, June 10 to 1-3. 
A second Fall show will be held at 
New York, Oct. 1 to 3. Both will be 
sponsored by EMA and the Sales 
Managers Club, and Kenneth A. 
Hathaway will be managing director. 

It is anticipated that the annua] 
RMA convention will be held in Chi- 
cago immediately preceding the June 
Trade Show. Three other meetings 
are definitely set for the period of 
this show — those of the Sales Man- 
agers Club, the Institute of Radio 
Service men, and "The Representa- 
tives."' 

The board of directors of the non- 
profit Trade Show Corporation as 
now constituted, consists of A. A. 
Berard, Ward Leonard Electric Co. ; 
Arthur Moss, Electrad, Inc., New 
York; S. N. Shure, Shure Brothers. 
Chicago, and Fred D. Williams, In- 
ternational Resistance Company, 
Philadelphia. Mr. Shure is presi- 
dent ; Mr. Berard, vice-president, and 
Mr. Moss, secretary-treasurer. 



PENNIES FROM HEAVEN 

* Web work in terms of broadcast 
billings for the span of 19.36 exhibits 
some fine increases over 1935. Co- 
lumbia's figure at the year-end is 
$23,289,000, a 32 per cent jump over 
the total for 1935. NBC's Red Net 
got $22,645,527 and for the Blue web 
the figure was $11,878,423; total of 
$34,523,950 represents an increase of 
10.8 per cent over 1935 doings. 

Mutual, the third national network 
who onl.y recently annexed the coast- 
to-coast reach will probably hit about 
$2,000,000 for the year. 



WHERE THE EIGHT 
MILLION WENT 



* Chart on this page shows what 
happened to the estimated 8,000,000 
radio receivers sold in 1936. Exports 
amounted to 650,000. Auto-radios 
1.700,000, increasing the total of 
autos-with-radios to 4,500,000. 

Of the remaining 5,650,000 home 
radios, 1,750,000 went to "new radio 
homes," families not previously pos- 
sessing radios. The 3,900,000 sets 
sold to homes already having radios, 



included at least a million sets pur- 
chased as "second" or "extra" sets, 
bringing the total of such "extra" sets 
in use up to 4,000,000. With total 
radio homes at 24,500,000, e.xtra sets 
and auto sets bring the grand total 
of radio-broadcast "listening posts" in 
U. S. up to 33,000,000 as of January, 
]937. 

FAILURES DROP 

* According to Dun & Bradstreet, 
Inc.. of the four concerns in the 
radio industry that filed applications 
for reorganization under Section 77-B 
of the New Bankruptcy Act during 
1936, three were manufacturers and 
one a wholesaler. This was the same 
number of cases as recorded in 1935, 
for which year two were manufactur- 
ers and two wholesalers. Only one 
case was listed for 1934. 

Since 1932, when the peak was set 
at 203, the annual reduction of fail- 
ures in the radio industry has been 
uninterrupted. The number for 1936 
was 52, as compared with the 1935 
total of 55. The decline in the de- 
faulted indebtedness, which reached 
an all-time high of $9,067,804 in 1931, 
has been even more marked. Steady 



RADIO'S 1936 SALES FEAT— WHAT BECAME OF ALL THE SETS 




January, 1937 




Time out from the Crosley convention. C. B. Savage, Shield Co., Ft. Worth, 

Tex., Lewis M. Crosley, vp & gm Crosley Radio Corp., Hymen Reader, Houston, 

Tex., and Lee Bird, Crosley field service. 



yearly drops had lowered this total 
to $602,920 in 1935, from which it 
rose to $729,048 for the 1936 period. 
The complete insolvency record for 
the radio industry since 1930, as com- 
piled by Dun & Bradstreet, Inc., 
shows : 

Manufacturers 
Year Number Liabilities 

1930 40 $3,522,400 

1931 25 4,088,445 

1932 38 2,035,630 

1933 31 3,705,592 

1934 12 1,242,868 

1935 9 160,625 

1936 5 185,359 




Ernest H. Vogel, who succeeds the 

also promoted Ralph Cordiner as 

manager of GE Radio department. 



AVholesalers and Retailers 

Year Number Liabilities 

1930 217 $2,071,392 

1931 160 4,979,359 

1932 165 1,974,351 

1933 109 1,813,980 

1934 48 2,294,299 

1935 46 442,295 

1936 47 543,689 



"17,000,000 EXISTING RADIOS 
DBSOLETE"— GEDDES 

* There are now about 6,700,000 
radio receiving sets in the United 
States capable of picking up Euro- 
pean and other overseas programs, ac- 
cording to Bond Geddes, executive 
vice-president of the Radio Manufac- 
turers Association. 

This means that about one-fourth 
of tho radio families in the U. S., the 
number of which Mr. Geddes esti- 
mates to be 24,269,000, are now able 
to listen to foreign as well as domestic 
radio programs. 

"Thus 17,500,000 radio families, or 
70 per cent, have obsolete sets, with- 
out modern receivers for short-wave 
foreign broadcasting." 

THEN LISTEN WE MUST 

■*■ Sweet signals from NBC trans- 
mitters in 1936 have added up to 
something. Total program production 
for the year in terms of Red and 
Blue stations hours on the air 
amounted to 18,650, which is practi- 
cally 10 per cent over 1935. Also in 
NBC affairs were notable increases in 
number of programs, mike appear- 
ances, number of stations signed. 

Mongst the 10 types of broadcasts 
(music, women's programs, children's 



features, talks, etc.) the accent runs 
to special events, reports and novelty. 
Special events were up almost 40 per 
cent because of such restless conti- 
nentals as David Windsor. Reports 
include weather, agricultural and 
market broadcasts and all these got a 
heavy play among NBC Pacific sta- 
tions. 

Stomp business is on the wane; 
amount of dance music declined 3.3 
per cent. Classical music rose 47.7 
per cent and when you tjrpe all mu- 
sic as "serious" or "popular" you no- 
tice that the increase for serious mel- 
ody was 21.4 per cent; for popular 
stuff, only 4.9 per cent. 

RADIO STORK 

* Seems that policemen, if they 
are aided and encouraged by reliable 
radios, are in position to help women 
to have babies. 

Recently at Greenburgh, N. T., 
the police dept. was the only outfit 
available when a local housewife, 
Mrs. Eleanor Moller, suddenly found 
it necessary to multiply. Patrolman 
George Butler answered the call while 
the doctor was still miles away, being 
fetched by another officer. 

Physician's car and Butler's car 
were linked by two-way radios. Latter 
was parked near Mrs. Moller's door 
with the controls turned up loud. 
Butler asked questions and followed 
directions, via radio, as he assisted 
the stricken woman through her crisis. 

Reward for the resourceful cop is 
that the Moller child was named after 
him — unless Kate Smith decides that 
he's a hero and says so on the air. 




S. N. Shure, of Shure Brothers, Chi- 
cago, president of Radio Parts Trade 
Show, Chicago, June 10-13. 



8 



Radio Today 




J. M. Marks, Fada president, who has 
been eminently successful in using 
color to interest women in extra sets. 

SPLASH OF COLOR 

* New radio models are afire with 
a modern treatment of bright colors. 
Just as a new car must look like a 
bullet in order to keep up with the 
streamline rage, radio must now be- 
deck itself in tints you never saw 
before. 

Rainbow trend has several advan- 
tages: colored sets lend themselves 
nicely to display; they fiU the need 
for sets in kitchens, nurseries, etc.; 
they attract persons who will buy 
anything that's novel; they shift at- 
tention away from the cabinet design 
itseK. 

TOBE PRICES UP 10-12% 

* Resale prices on a majority of 
radio-tube numbers were increased 
from 10 to 12 per cent this month, 
materializing a move long wanted by 
distributors, dealers and servicemen. 
The price increases were general 
throughout the tube field. 

"These price modifications are the 
result of changes in type costs due 
to increased material and labor costs, 
variations in the proportional de- 
mands for the different types, and 
need for additional revenue in every 
branch of the tube business," explains 
E. S. Dietrich, manager of distribu- 
tor sales for Raytheon. 

Sample price increases are: Type 
80 to 70 cents; type 26 to 70 cents; 
type 27 to 80 cents; type 45 to 80 
cents; 77 and 78 to $1.20; 6A8G to 
$1.50; 6L7 to $1.75; 6C6 and 6D6 to 
$1.20. 



NEW YEAR'S RESOLUTIONS 

* Some time ago there came to 
light in one of the old RCA files some 
suggestions written by David Samoff 
early in 1923. They are as f oUows : 

1 — Adapt yourself to circumstances, 
but don't lose character and pur- 
pose. 

2 — Be frank, but not blunt. 

3 — Be courageous, but not defiant. 

4 — Work hard, but consistently and 
not In spots. 

5 — Specialize and master some one 
thing, but don't narrow yourself 
and lose perspective. 

6 — Cultivate the power of expression 
In writing and speaking, but don't 
be verbose. 

7 — Separate the fundamentals from 
the details and summarize for ac- 
tion, but don't ignore the details. 

8 — Have faith in mankind and self- 
confidence, but do not be gullible 
or conceited. 

9 — Be democratic with your business 
and personal associates, but not to 
the point of breeding contempt or 
disrespect. 
10 — Visualize and plan ahead, but not 
so far ahead as to overlook the 
immediate future. 
11 — Strive to win by forty, but don't 
lose your health in doing It. 

BUYERS WANT BETTER SETS; 
BATTERY MODELS UP 

* General prosperity across the 
land is held accountable for the in- 
creasing demand for console radios 
and for higher priced units. In the 
Middle West better farm conditions 
have resulted in a great increase in 
battery-set sales — expected to run be- 
tween 800,000 and 850,000 for the 
year 1936. 




Prince Bernhard, who married Hol- 
land's Crown Princess, visits Dr. Phil- 
lips, Europe's radio king, at Eindhoven. 

There is evidence that list prices 
are being better maintained; with 
the protection of certain state laws 
supported by the Supreme Court de- 
cision on fair-trade practice, radio 
dealers will have the protection of 
price legislation. 

Threatened price increases hare 
been a spur to some activity, although 
these increases have not generally ma- 
terialized. Many new "interim mod- 
els" have been introduced with the 
new calendar year. New features and 
gadgets continue to be in demand, 
particularly in the more sophisticated 
centers. 




Boake Carter, with Mr. and Mrs. Sayre Ramsdell of Philco, on a hunting trip 
into the Pennsylvania mountains. 



January, 1937 



HOW TO MEET "CHAIN" COMPETITION 

Radio dealer has many big guns on his side in present 
bitter war with chain-stores and mail-order retail outlets. 



• INDEPENDENT radio dealers 
in many communities are facing seri- 
ous competition from chain stores and 
mail-order houses selling sets. In- 
creasingly, such chain-store selling 
has been felt by merchants in other 
fields, and now its sinister influence 
is manifested in radio, particularly 
in the low-price lines. 

Yet the independent radio dealer 
has many advantages over the chain- 
store operator, if he will put these 
advantages to work. Moreover, the 
independent merchant can take many 
a page out of the chain operator's 
notebook, and can apply to indepen- 
dent selling most of the methods 
which have made chain-store mer- 
chandising so effective. 

That the lower brackets of radio-set 
sales have been chiefly affected by 
chain-store competition is evidenced 
by the effect on transactions in used 
sets and "trade-ins." 

Low-priced market 

In cities where chain stores flour- 
ish sales of used sets are off 50 per 
cent to 70 per cent! Surveys in typ- 
ical midwestern communities show 
that present volume sales of low- 
priced, private-brand receivers are 
having the effect of decreasing the 
prospects for traded-in sets. The big 
chains refuse to accept trade-ins, but 
1 maintain volume with new merchan- 
dise at low prices. 

In Niles, Mich., Starr Gephart, 
radio salesman in Henry R. Hill's 



home-furnishing store, says, "We're 
located right across the street from 
the biggest chain department store in 
Southern Michigan and, if anything, 
it attracts business for us." A stock 
of four new sets and eleven used sets 
tells a different story. The used sets 
are priced right; yet the.y are not 
selling ! 

Across the street shoppers crowd 
in and out of Niles' largest depart- 
ment store, a mail-order chain opera- 
tion. In a quiet corner of the second 
floor some thirty new receivers are 
attractively displayed. Each set bears 
a price-tag on which is printed the 
terms of time-payment sales. Answer- 
ing our question, a clerk replied, 
"Used sets? I'm sorry; we haven't 
any on hand. But you can buy a 
modern seven-tube all-wave console 
we have here for only $34.95. Four 
dollars down and four dollars a 
month." 

On the wall back of the radios are 
the words. "The World's Largest Re- 
tailer of Radio." The chain-mail- 
order firm which operates this store 
sold over half a million new receivers 
in 1936. ($.'!02.577,265 in nil lines for 
the first eleven months of 1936 ; a 
21.9 per cent increase over the pre- 
vious year!) 

What this competition means to 
those independent dealers who feature 
used sets and trade-ins is evident in 
the ratio of eleven used sets to four 
new sets in Hill's store. Used sets 
cannot be sold at their current trade- 
in prices, in competition with new. 



low-priced, private-brand sets. Fur- 
thermore, independent dealers hand- 
ling such trade-ins make two sales to 
complete one, and perhaps lose the 
sale of a new small set in selling the 
used one. 

''Trade-ins^' on consignment 

Mrs. Ruth Christensen, proprietor 
of the Niles Music Shop, and Niles' 
leading radio dealer, avoids direct 
competition with the chain store in 
the low-price class by featuring only 
high-priced radios. She evades the 
trade-in issue by taking used receiv- 
ers on consignment only. If they 
sell, the money is applied on a new 
set. If not, the used set does not 
enter into the transaction for the new 
radio. 

On the subject of chain-store sell- 
ing, Mrs. Christensen says, "We 
don't run into much competition from 
chain stores because the class of trade 
we sell would not want to let their 
friends see a chain-store or mail-order 
radio in their homes. We can't af- 
ford to solicit low-priced business. It 
takes just as long to sell a $35 radio 
as it takes to sell a $95 set. We 
haven't had much luck with trade-ins 
so we take used sets only on con- 
•signment." 

In spite of optimistic statements 
by Niles' dealers, chain stores are 
selling the bulk of the radios in the 
Niles territory. Records of radio ser- 
vice men. checked with the aid of 
veteran Bill Hansen, local parts dis- 




WIDE PRICE DIFFERENCES between identical receivers. A well-known U-tube set is featured in Niles, Mich., at 
$48.75; in South Bend, Ind., under another name and slightly different cabinet, $78.95; and in an auto-supplies chain $95. 



10 



Radio Today 



tributor, disclosed that nearly half 
the receivers in Niles and the adjoin- 
ing rich Michigan fruit belt are fa- 
miliar chain-store brands ! 

South Bend situation 

Ten miles south of Niles, in South 
Bend, Ind., 19 independent dealers 
also suffer from chain-store competi- 
tion. Four chain outlets (the largest 
being a branch department store of 
a big Chicago mail-order firm) fea- 
ture radio sets at prices averaging 20 
per cent to 40 per cent below price 
levels of national-brand sets. This 
department store employs four full- 
time servicemen to make installations 
and minor adjustments on new set? 
and to service sets for old customers. 
Contrary to trade belief, the chain 
sets are of good quality and give no 
more trouble than any other line of 
receivers. 



INDEPENDENT DEALER 

enjoys these advantases: 

Expert knowledge of radio sets 
Handles publicly-advertised brands 
Higher down - payments; shorter 

contracts 
Chains' widely different prices for 

same sets 
Chain brands orphaned by changing 

factories 
Public prejudice against chain-store 

brands 



factory in country in which all our 
sets are made to the same standards 
as the leading brands. The reason we 
can offer better prices is because of 
our more economical s.vsteni of dis- 
tribution." 



store managers are responsible for 
any losses. 

Three of South Bend's chain radio 
outlets also sell auto parts. Auto 
radios are featured in each case, al- 
though midget sets and console mod- 
els are also displayed. The smaller 
sets are low priced, but the console 
models average as high as equivalent 
national brand receivers. 

$48.75 to $95 same set 

Interesting price differences exist 
between identical receivers sold under 
various private brands. A well-known 
eleven-tube set, made in Chicago, is 
featured in Xiles, Mich., at $48.75; in 
South Bend, Ind., under another name 
and in a slightly different cabinet at 
$78.95, and in a chain of auto service 
stations, under a third private brand, 
at $95.00! This set is of excellent 




MAIL-ORDER retail outlets depend largely on farmers 
and other drive-in customers. 



SAME MODEL built in two different factories, discredit- 
ing clerk's claim of "our own make." 



This store is credited with selling 
over 1,300 radio sets in 1936! Its 
business as a whole increased 27 per 
cent over the previous year. The en- 
tire business of this chain organiza- 
tion exceeded, in 1936, a million and 
a half dollars a day! This amazing 
volume of sales was accomplished de- 
spite a strict credit department. Quot- 
ing Martin Sens, a nearby dealer, "To 
get a demonstration of one of their 
sets in your home, you must make the 
down payment, sign away power of 
attorney and give ample credit ref- 
erences." Store managers are person- 
ally responsible for credit losses, and 
they exercise greater caution than 
store owners ! 

Loitering in the chain store, R.\di(i 
Today's representative heard a sales- 
man explaining the RMA label on 
the back of a set. "That means one 
of the big three— RCA, Philco an.l 
us. We have the second largest radio 



A trade-in is rarely accepted by a 
chain store unless taken in at such 
a ridiculously low figure that a profit 
is certain in its I'esale. Here again 



CHAIN-STORE 

policies worth copying: 

Handle "trade-ins" at a profit, or not 
at all 

Stock diversified goods, creating store 
traffic 

Enforce strict credit policy 

Develop good rural trade by direct- 
mail lists 

Use newspaper advertising extensively 

Employ trained store managers, usually 
college graduates 



ciuality with the most modern fea- 
tures. The only disparaging remark 
a dealer can make about these sets is 
that the customer never knows 
whether he is getting a real bargain 
or not. 

Yet chain stores have few real ad- 
vantages over independent stores, 
while the home-owned stores have 
many advantages over their big rivals. 
Careful analysis of both systems of 
retailing discloses room for extensive 
improvement in radio merchandising. 
For instance, the diversified merchan- 
dise in a chain store assures greater 
store traffic. This suggests side lines 
for independent dealers, such as cam- 
eras, records, sheet music, novelties, 
etc., which will increase store traffic. 

Well-paid salesmen in independent 
stores know their merchandise better 
and have better sales ability than the 
low-salaried clerks in the chain organ- 
izations. Here the chains are at- 



January, 1937 



11 



tempting economy at the sacrifice of 
ability, though really paying the dif- 
ference in salary in terms of lost 
prospects and sales. The chain stores 
handle the trade-in problem in the 
only way it can ever be handled sat- 
isfactorily — at a profit or not at all. 
Dealers have a real lesson to learn 
in this respect. Already shrewd in- 
dependents refuse private-brand trade- 
ins at any price! 

Store stocks; 
advertising 

Chain stores usually display a 
larger stock of radio merchandise. 
This conveys an impression of large 
Scale operations. Independents who 
concentrate on one line, instead of 
trying to pick a few leading models 
in several lines, can better match the 
impression created by the variety of 
models under one brand in the chain 
stores. 

Dealers with national-brand receiv- 
ers have the advantage of magazine 
and often radio advertising by the 
manufacturer. Of course, the chain 
stores point to the size and reliability 
of their own firm to counteract this 
form of advertising. Dealers defend 
themselves by explaining that under 
the competitive system of choosing 
manufacturers of a private brand, the 
sets may come from a different source 
each year, making previous models 
orphans. The independent in offer- 
ing a recognized brand, protects his 
customer's investment against sudden 
depreciation, which is a well known 
feature of orphan radios. 

Mail-order chain stores have a good 
rural trade which has been developed 
almost entirely through direct-mail 



advertising. So far, independent 
dealers have felt that rural solicita- 
tion was unprofitable and they have 
ignored this market to a large extent. 
A good rural mailing list is the key 
to selling this market in the face of 
catalog competition. 

Scrutinize credits 

Strict credit investigation by chain 
stores reduces credit losses on long- 
time contracts. But the chains lose 
prospects to independent dealers, who, 
because of higher down payments and 
short-term contracts, have less con- 
cern about credit references. And in 
addition, they can offer the advan- 
tage of lower carrying charges where 
a larger down payment is secured. 

Chain organizations use newspaper 
advertising more extensively than in- 
dependent dealers, who rarely take 
full advatage of their local news- 
papers for fear of boosting their sets 
which are also handled by other stores. 
Manufacturers can do little in news- 
papers without dealer cooperation. 
On the other hand, independents have 
access to better circulars and sales 
helps. The catalogs handed out by 
chain stores are well written, but are 
usually printed in cheap style on poor 
quality paper. Prices are rarely in- 
cluded because of variations from 
time to time in different stores of the 
same chain. Here the independents 
have the advantage of nationally ad- 
vertised prices. 



M 



Managers college men 



An advantage held by chain stores 
is the care with which they select 
their managers, nearly all of whom 
are college-trained men who have 



TUBE STOCKS LAG BEHIND MARKET. BLAME TRADE SITUATION 




worked themselves up through their 
merchandising ability in various de- 
partments of the stores. They are 
guided in their efforts by the men 
who have preceded them. Some of 
the keenest merchants in the country 
are at the head of large chain selling 
organizations. Independent dealers, 
who are not too proud to learn from 
chain store methods, can pick up 
many sales ideas and display ideas 
which will prove profitable. Distribu- 
tors can circulate these ideas to other 
dealers. 

The coming year will witness even 
greater competition between chain 
outlets and independents than did 
1936. Dealers can no longer afford 
to ignore the low-priced market which 
furnishes the chains with prospects 
who at times may be sold a higher- 
priced set. Trade-ins must be reduced 
or even eliminated. In the 1937 
battle with the chains, the indepen- 
dents have the advantage, if they will 
use it. 



PHONOGRAPH RECORDS 

BEST SELLERS AS 
WE GO TO PRESS 

BLUEBIRD 

It*s De - Lovely. Wintertime Dreams. 

Both with Shep Fields and his Ripplins 
Rhythm — B6639. 

In the Chapel in the Moonlight. Yon're 
Ev'rythinsr Sweet. Both with Shep 
Fields and his Rippling Rhythm — B6640. 
Easy to Love. I've Got You Under My 
Skin. Both with Shep Fields and his 
Rippling- Rhythm — B6592. 

BRUNSWICK 
That'.s Life I Gue.s.s. Pennies Prom 
Heaven. Both with VC by Blllie Holi- 
day, both with Teddy Wilson and his 
orchestra — 77S9. 

I Can't Give You Anything But Love. 
VC by Blllie Holiday. Sallin' — stomp. 
Both with Teddy Wilson and his or- 
chestra — 77S1. 

So Do I. VC by Skinny Ennis. Pennies 
Prom Heaven. VC by Maxine Grey. Both 
with Hal Kemp and his orchestra — 7749. 

COLUSIBIA 
Mr. Ghost Goes To Town. Algiers Stomp. 

— stomp. Both by Mills Blue Rhythm 

Band under direction of Lucky Millin- 

der — 3158D. 

Serenade in the Night — tango. Me and 

the Moon. Both with vocal refrain, 

both with Mantovani and his Tipica 

orchestra — 3159D. 

I Heard a Song in a Taxi. Supposing. 

Both by the British Broadcasting Co. 

orchestra with vocal retrain — 3160D. 

DECCA 

(By Titles) 
In the Chapel in the Moonlight. Ruth 
Etting — 1084. Mai Hallett and his or- 
chestra — 1033. Roy Smeck and his 
Serenaders — 1038. 

It's De-Lovely. Will Osborne and his 
orchestra — 1058. 

Pennies From Heaven. Bing Crosby — 
947. Jimmy Dorsey and his orchestra 
— 951, 

VICTOR 
AVhispering. Tiger Rag. Both with 
Benny Goodman Quartet — 25481. 
Pennies From Heaven. So Do I. Both 
with Eddy Duchin and his orchestra 
—25431. 

It's De-Lovely. You've Got Something. 
Both with Eddy Duchin and his orches- 
tra — 25432. 



12 



Radio Today 











^-^-^ '*..*. 




Reiilty Associates, Inc.. Stewart Manor, Fairchild Photo 

EACH KEY RADIO DEALER* 

MEANS A CONSUMER -MARKET 

OF 320 RADIO SETS 

At $55 per set, this is an average set business of $17,600 per dealer. 

This radio dealer also represents definite consumer markets for other radio 
products, too, — all within walking distance of his store. For example: 

He sells annually 3,000 replacement radio tubes 

He does annually $4000 worth of servicing and repairs 

He sells annually $3000 worth of parts and supplies 

He contacts continually 2000 homes. In these homes — 

He is "radio advisor extraordinary" to a population of 8000 

Of these 2000 homes, 500 homes still have no radio set,- the other 
1500 are "homes with radios" (200 of these radio-homes have 
two, three or more sets). 

Of the regular sets now in use in these 1500 radio homes, 250 are 
sets 3 years old; 250 are 4 years old; 250 are 5 years old, and 
500 are six years old or older. 

Of these 2000 homes, 1000 have autos (250 with auto-radios, the 
rest without). 

*There are 15,000 such radio dealers and 15,000 such radio "com- 
munities" in the United States. These 15,000 dealers do 85% of the 
radio business. 



RADIO TODAY, JANUARY, 1937 



13 



STATISTICS OF THE RADIO BUSINESS 

THE FLOW OF DOLLARS THROUGH THE RADIO INDUSTRY— 851 MILLIONS YEARLY 




DNCLE SAM'S ANNUAL BILL FOR RADIO 

Sale of time by broadcasters, 1936 $11 4,000,000 

Talent costs, 1936 36,000,000 

Electricity, batteries, etc., to operate 

33,000,000 receivers 1 50,000,000 

8,000,000 radio sets sold in "36 440,000,000 

46,000,000 replacement tubes 31 ,000,000 

Radio parts, supplies, etc 45,000,000 

Servicing radio sets 75,000,000 

U.S. Public paid for radios in 1936 $891,000,000 



RADIO SETS IN USE 

Jan. 1,1936 Jan. 1,1937 

U.S. homes with radios . . . 22,869,000 24,500,000 
Extra and "second" sets in 

above homes 3,000,000 4,000,000 

Automobile radios in use 3,000,000 4,500,000 

Total radio sets in use, U.S. . 28,869,000 33,000,000 



Total homes with autos . . 1 7,650,000 
Total residence telephones . 1 1 ,000,000 
Total homes with electricity 21,030,000 

Total homes in U.S 31,000,000 

Population U.S 1 28,000,000 



1 8,000,000 
11,500,000 
21,800,000 
31,471,000 
128,853,000 



RADIO-SET AND TUBE SALES 

Number Retail Value 
Total radio sets sold during 

1 936 8,000,000 $440,000,000 

Radio sets exported 650,000 

Automobile radios 1,700,000 85,000,000 

Home radios sold in U.S... 5,650,000 310,000,000 
Home sets sold as replace- 
ments 3,900,000 21 5,000,000 

Home sets sold to homes 

previously without radios 1,750,000 96,000,000 
Home radios sold as extra 

sets 1 ,000,000 55,000,000 

Battery sets 800,000 40,000,000 

Tube replacements 46,000,000 31,000,000 

Tubes, initial equipment . 50,000,000 

Total tubes sold 1 936 96,000,000 70,000,000 

Parts, supplies, etc 45,000,000 

ROLL-CALL OF RADIO INDUSTRY 

Manufacturers of radio receivers 144 

Manufacturers of radio tubes 13 

Manufacturers of radio parts 620 

Manufacturers of test equipment 55 

Manufacturers of broadcast and amateur equip. 110 

N/anufacturers of sound equipment 95 



14 



RADIO TODAY, JANUARY, 1937 



-PRODUCTION, SALES, USE -193? 



Radio-set and parts distributors 1 ,760 

Manufacturers agents 240 

Retail outlets selling radios 50,300 

Dealers doing 85% oF radio business 1 5,000 

Servicemen, including dealers' servicemen .... 40,000 

Radio amateurs and experimenters 80,000 

Broadcasting stations, Jan. 1, 1937 656 

ANNUAL EXPORTS OF RADIO SETS 

1935 1936 

Jan 43,898 46,951 

Feb 46,470 45,383 

Mar 47,693 58,595 

Apr 47,890 46,046 

May 41,302 45,071 

June 35,912 39,460 



U. S. HOMES WITH RADIOS, JAN. 1, 1937 



July. 
Aug. 
Sept. 
Oct.. 
Nov. 
Dec. 



.38,102 35,877 

44,896 48,963 

.50,275 60,949 

63,552 74,905 

74,982 82,900 Est. 

54,147 59,900 Est. 



Total . 



588,105 645,000 



Total in 1934 was 612,084 sets. 



Ala 276,000 

Ariz 66,900 

Ark 200,500 

Calif 1,503,000 

Colo 221,700 

Conn 399,300 

Dela 50,500 

D. C 134,000 

Fla 250,000 

Ga 358,000 

Idaho 81,200 

III 1,792,000 

Ind 660,000 

la 538,000 

Kans 372,500 

Ky 335,800 

La 278,000 

Maine 175,000 

Md 342,200 

Mass 1,015,000 

Mich 1,004,000 

Minn 574,000 

Miss 1 78,000 

Mo 758,000 

Mont 98,200 



Neb 

Nev 

N. H..... 

N.J 

N. Mex.. 

N. y 

N. C 

N. Dak... 
Ohio. . . . 

Okia 

Ore 

Pa 

R. I 

S. C 

S. Dak.. . . 

Tenn 

Texas. . . . 

Utah 

Vt 

Va 

Wash 

W. Va. . . 

Wis 

Wyo 

Total U.S. 



285,700 

23,200 

1 06,900 

960,000 

51,700 

. 3,213,000 
365,500 
107,500 

. 1,493,000 
358,400 
232,000 

. 2,083,000 
160,700 
1 86,800 
114,500 
352,000 
922,000 
91 ,000 
77,500 
361 ,000 
371,700 
257,000 
61 7,000 

. 47,800 

.24,500,000 



RETAIL SALES QUOTAS OF STATES AND CITIES, BASED ON SURVEYS OF MET. SUNDAY NEWSPAPERS AND U. S. RETAIL CENSUS 






P,RE■.■^|poRT-WYOJMC■n 
|-;90%--. LAND 22%|Ntb. 

' ■ '^^^"'1.10% IOWA 

CALIF 6.7 eViDA. r^T-rT-: 1.92% 

.,,,,...^ ...|.35% ^MAHA !p^;TI 

'.oakrand: I LiiiJ, IMoiNes 



leT-i 2.49% I, 



•^'WFe{5^ 





scra.ntonI 



N.Y. 14.94% 

SyRfAiB 



Nj i:^;^ii RxTi @i! 

4.06% L— ^- i;;:-.;^yiftS0SE^ 



MASS. jre 

CAlwBmBUi;:;:'.:;-.'"-'-' 



2.28%5.76%;..V.-.:.V.- 
tTf.-rt:oiZ£DO.: ■-':■.■.; I 
:BENb> ;■■. -iClJEVELAND 



PA.7.50% IgOTgRSON 

t-":'-:-ij I _ 



^'W^i™. 


... 


OKLA.r- 


i^a 


"-7- 1.37% Pi^.=>«.72% 

37^ ■'■ \sm \ 






jf^^^VVSRPiSTERRIVER 
NEW BEDpflRg' 



\^?!m m 



6ftm0.m7i 



TEX. 3.8 g% 



M SS..56% ALA. 



t-:-.-.-.:iNEW.| . 

?-l::-J ORLEANS/ 



i.54.%-..v..v;.;"'~ 

.BAUrilMOREI :| 



N.C. 1.45:^ 



GA.L4i% iat^^n:^-^ 



"HOW TO MAKE MORE PROFITS 

Seller s market points need oF return to business Fundamentals 




Look up your lists of past customers. A lot of them are ready for new radio 
sets, better sets. Then reach for the telephone — or your hat! 



* Above all else, 1937 will be 
radio's great merchandising year. 
Radio manufacturers, jobbers and 
dealers will during the next twelve 
months need to go back to fundamen- 
tal principles in distributing goods — 
to find and to apply the lessons which 
merchants in older lines have used 
with success over many years. 

Already there is evidence that 1937 
will be a "seller's market," with a 
definite trend away from the disas- 
trous "buyer's market" that has dom- 
inated the dolorous 1930's. Advent 
of a "seller's market" should bring 
price stabilization, and closer trade 
relationships between manufacturer, 
distributor and dealer. 

Commenting on this seller's market 



in radio, E. T. Cunningham, presi- 
dent of ECA Manufacturing Com- 
pany, observes that "the sale of 
higher-priced units is again larger 
and the trend is definitely up. With 
the cost of raw materials and labor 
steadily mounting, the necessity for 
marking-up radio-set prices becomes 
increasingly urgent and inevitable if 
radio is to be a profitable business 
for all. 

Watch customers 

"In the coming year, much can be 
done by the dealer, the wholesaler and 
the manufacturer in a cooperative ef- 
fort to eliminate some of the destruc- 
tive trade practices which have been 
carried over from the darkest days 



out of which the radio industry seems 
now to have emerged. I am hopeful 
that much more will be accomplished 
in the new year." 

Asked to counsel radio dealers 
about 1937 plans, Ralph J. Cordiner, 
General Electric Company, Bridge- 
port, Conn., advises : 

"Radio, which has brought so much 
happiness to practically every home 
in the land, can also bring happiness 
and profit to radio retailers, if all re- 
tailers, as a body, resolve to conduct 
their businesses along those lines they 
know to be sound. As a step in that 
direction let us all keep our eyes 
focused more on our customers and 
less on our competitors." 

Better business 

Virtually every business indicator 
points to 1937 as a year of "enormous 
possibilities," says Sayre M. Ramsdell, 
vice-president of Philco Radio and 
Television Corporation. Continued 
business improvement generally and 
for the radio industry especially, is 
"definitely assured," he says. 

"Many of the largest advertising 
budgets adopted for 1937 show sizable 
increases over the amounts spent last 
year. A greater volume of advertis- 
ing means a larger volume of busi- 
ness ; more business means less unem- 
ployment; and all this sums up into 
more money." 

Mr. Ramsdell sees "unlimited pos- 
sibilities" in the radio field, pointing 
out that surveys have shown that 25 
per cent of radios now in use are more 
than six years old and lack short- 
wave range and automatic or mag- 
netic tuning. 

Higher prices and large volumes 
are seen by Powel Crosley, Jr., presi- 
dent of Crosley Radio Corporation. 



Remind Your Customers 

"If your radio is 1 year old" — 

it lacks automatic frequency control & dial tuning 

"If your radio is 2 years old" — 
if lacks high fidelity 

"If your radio is 3 years old" — 
it lacks an airplane-type dial 



"If your radio is 4 years old" — 
it lacks all-wave reception 

"If your radio is 5 years old" — 

it lacks linear diode detection 

"If your radio is 6 years old" — 
it is not a superheterodyne 



16 



Radio Today 




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n 



OUT OF RADIO IN 1937"-! 

Basic business policies essential to put dealer s liouse in order 



"The average price of sets sold has 
increased materially to about $65 for 
consoles and $42 for table models. It 
is estimated that the sales of auto 
radio sets for 1936 will reach 1,600,- 
000 to 1,750,000 units, compared with 
1,200,000 auto radios sold in 1935. 
The figure for 1937 unquestionably 
will be still greater. Radio, itself, 
has been one of the most important 
factors in business recovery. Being 
a $400,000,000-a-year industry, it is 
itself a great factor in business ad- 
vancement." 

Accelerated vigor 

Looking ahead, David Sarnoff, pres- 
ident. Radio Corporation of America, 
sees finer programs on the air and 
increased size and responsiveness of 
the national radio audience. 

"The new art of television has 
moved out of the research laboratory 
into the field of engineering experi- 
ments under actual service conditions. 
There is every reason to believe that 
during the year 1937 the progress of 
radio, so significantly demonstrated 
during the twelve months just passed, 
will continue with accelerated vigor.'' 

Retail check' up 

With a new tempo thus introduced 
into the radio selling situation, the 
retail radio dealer needs to check 
over his own business plans. 

To take advantage of the new op- 
portunity, it will be necessary, in 
most eases, to overhaul his own mer- 
chandising set-up, all along the line. 

Item by item, the functions of sell- 
ing must be scrutinized, to see if, 
good as they were in the past, they 
measure up to the new conditions. 

Store Location. Is this right to 
get the 1937 buying traffic? Is the 
store-front attractive and modern ? 
Would a move be justified by better 
business ? 

Window Displays. Are these 
changed frequently and kept at a high 
standard of merchandising appeal? 
Are manufacturers' displays regularly 
used? Is advantage taken of motion 
displays? Special lighting effects? 

Store Interior. Does this need 
overhauling? Have fixtures gotten 
shabby? Should floor layout be 
changed? What about demonstration 
rooms? 



Salespeople. Does the sales per- 
sonnel measure up to 1937 require- 
ments? Can better salesmen be 
found? Would commission payments 
help? Can home demonstrations be 
handled better? 

Advertising. Is enough attention 
given to this all-important builder of 
sales? Shall we use more newspaper 
space in 1937? More pictures? Di- 
rect-mail ? 

Installment Selling. People have 
confidence today, even if they haven't 
cash, and so are once more receptive 
to time-payment selling. Are dealer's 
selling policies tuned into this re- 
stored opportunity for time sales? 

Bookkeeping. Does accounting sys- 
tem give a prompt and complete pic- 
ture of operating costs and results? 
Does it give effective control? Is 
present system too expensive and 
bothersome ? 

Prospect Lists. Are former cus- 
tomers being followed up? Do new 
prospects get announcements of spe- 
cial interest? Is telephone selling 
being used ? 

Stock-control. Is right merchan- 
dise on hand? More lines or less? 
Right price brackets ? 

Tax Problems. Taxes loom larger 
than ever in the business picture — 
local taxes, state taxes, Federal taxes. 



Is dealer's business arranged to meet 
this tax burden most economically? 
Is he watching all possible short-cuts 
to tax savings? 

Profit Yardstick. How does deal- 
er's showing compare with other simi- 
lar businesses? Are yardsticks avail- 
able for measuring "good operation" 
under present conditions? (Radio 
Today will have more on this in Feb- 
ruary, just before you fill out your 
income-tax report, due March 15.) 

Foregoing is a check-list which 
every radio dealer should apply to his 
own business during the opening 
months of 1937. It will pay every 
retailer to shake himself out of his rut 
and ask himself these questions. 

In large measure each radio busi- 
ness man can answer these queries to 
his own immediate benefit. Merely 
turning his attention to these situ- 
ations, one by one, will often suggest 
the best solution under the conditions. 

But there are also problems on 
which the radio dealer needs outside 
help and counsel. To provide this 
expert assistance in "making more 
profits out of radio" Radio Today will 
during 1937 present a series of 
articles, based on the practical ex- 
perience of leading merchandising 
authorities in radio, taking up the 
main functions of profitable selling of 
radio for the retailer. 




Mrs. Ruth Christensen. proprietor of the Music Shop, leading radio dealer of 
Niles, Mich., makes a specialty of upper-bracket radios. (P.S. She got the order.) 



January, 1937 



17 






H. D. Hatfield & Son, Hollywood. Cal. Weill's, Bakersfield, Cal. Levitz Furniture Co., Lebanon, Pa. Wurlitzer Co., New York City 

PROMOTION CALENDAR FOR RADIO DEALERS 

Eisht experts crowd the days with seasonal tips From their experience 



January 25-37 

25 — Investigate your phonograpli- 
radio customers. Cheek on whether 
Aey're bu.ying records and regard 
them as "extra set" prospects later on. 
26 — Pick an important sport event 
out of the headlines and plug it as a 
date before which listeners must cer- 
tainly buy new radio tubes. 
27 — Feature the words, "Where Do 
You Spend Your Time?" in ads and 
window displays in an effort to re- 
mind prospects that they need good 
sets in their cars, bedrooms, kitchens, 
etc. 

28 — Plan now for Lincoln's and 
Washington's birthdays. Prepare their 
pictures for your window and say 
that their characters mean a lot to 
radio dealing. 

29 — Check up on the persons who 
buy rec rds from you but have never 
bought a combination or a phono- 
graph. Ask them, "Can it be that 
fine up-to-date recordings are being 
played on an old-fashioned spring 
operated "jollopy" of pre-war vin- 
tage?" 

30 — Announce that your new sets 
"have a new engineering feature that 
you can understand." Display the 
backs of a receiver or two. 
31 — Sunday. 



February 1-20 

1 — Feature a lively "Eepeat New 
Year's Resolution." 
2 — Build your Valentine window. Get 
some comic Valentines, the more 
crude the better, and enlarge them 
for backgrounds. Accent the party 
atmosphere with hearts and cupids; 
plug broadcast dance music. 
3 — Get the phrase, "Let's Trade 
Radios," set up in unusual type and 
use it in newspaper copy and on win- 
dow placards. 

4 — Sell the idea that each home 
should have a radio den. Use the 
details on how to create one and list 
all articles necessary along with list 
of advantages. 

5 — Connect with the art instructors in 
your local high schools and arrange to 
have the best student-drawn Valen- 
tines displayed in your window. 
6 — Talk up the broadcast this p.m. 
from the Metropolitan Opera in New 
York, just as you might have done 
last Saturday and may do next. 
7 — Sunday. 

8 — Publish a Valentine edition of 
"Radio Store News." Use free hand 
comic art work and conceal your ad- 
vertising in the running comment. 
9 — Cheek your filing system for all 



names and addresses of prospects 
picked up from different sources. 
Think of them in terms of the three 
holiday appeals that can be made at 
this time. 

10 — Collect the names of all persons 
in your area interested in voice cul- 
ture. Arrange to demonstrate fre- 
quency control on new sets. 
1 1 — Mail Valentine postcards to your 
prospect list. 
12 — Lincoln's Birthda,y. 
13 — Display a huge batch of short 
wave lists and logs. 
14 — Sunday. St. Valentine's Day. 
15 — Start spot announcements on the 
air three times a week at 12 noon to 
12 :15. Besides replacement market, 
you can hit auto radio, second set and 
tube market. 

16 — Stir up interest in war news 
from Europe. Blow up lists of all 
news broadcasts. 

17 — Group all the display cards you 
got recently from manufacturers into 
a flashy background for new models. 
18 — Collect a group of "stills" from 
recent movies showing stars operating 
radios in action scenes. 
19 — Build a campaign on the dozens 
of new receivers that now are avail- 
able in assorted colors. "Rainbow" 
theme to be used in window display. 




Spear's New York City Greene's Radio Service, Lynn, Mass. Albert's Dept. Store, Napa, Cal. Snavely-Kelvinator, Lebanon, Pa. 

18 Radio Today 



1937 AUTOMOBILE RADIOS 

— automatic frequency control for easy, accurate tuning 

— acoustic compensation for better tone quality 

— sales features give radio stores edge on car dealers 



* PEEVIEW of the new auto 
sets indicates that radio dealers will 
have many new features with which 
to sell the new sets. And the set 
manufacturers will bring them to the 
attention of the motoring public. On 
the basis of circuit developments, 
descriptive phrases, and other sales 
advantages the radio dealer has been 
given greater opportunity than the 
auto dealer who must sell one type 
of set. 

One of the outstanding develop- 
ments has been the introduction of 
automatic frequency control for auto 
radios. So far only General Electric 
has announced AFC sets. With AFC 
the driver can tune in a station ap- 
proximately and then the set does 
the rest, automatically tuning in the 
signal perfectly. This means that the 
driver need pay but little attention 
to tuning. G-E also uses class "B" 
audio amplification. 

Lighting of dial 

Again in 1937 Zenith is featuring 
"America's Safest Auto Eadio." The 
safety lies in the big black no-glare 
dial which is easy to read and has a 
novel lighting arrangement which can 
be turned off after tuning has been 
completed. A single-figure beam is 
used which lights up only the figure 
to which the tuning indicator is 
pointing. On the steering-post model, 
the tone and volume controls take the 
form of knurled wheels at the left of 
the dial. 

Arvin advertising stresses the 
"Phantom Filter'' which brings in 
more stations and insures low noise 
level. This filter is a device which 
is inserted in the antenna lead and 
increases the efiicieney of the trans- 
mission line. A "Geographical Com- 
pensator" or sensitivity control per- 
mits an adjustment of the sensitivity 
of the set to meet individual require- 
ments. 

ECA's Magic Voice has been in- 
corporated in the deluxe auto sets. 
This acoustic equalizing gives a tone 
quality that is equivalent of home 
performance. Other ECA features 
are : synchronous vibrator-rectifier 
eliminating the need for a separate 
rectifier tube and 9-watt output in 
larger models. 



A die-cast housing is utilized in 
Emerson's deluxe model. This de- 
velopment in structural sturdiness 
provides freedom from rattles and 
microphonism. 

One of the DeWald Motortone re- 
ceivers is of the self-contained type 
and mounts behind the instrument 
panel, the controls being below and 
flush with the panel. This type of 
construction results in a substantial 
saving in cost. 

Simpler mounting 

Single or two-hole mounting is 
found in new auto sets, a feature sim- 
plifying the installation problem. 
Custom controls for all car models 
permit the radio dealer to compete 
with car automotive dealers selling 
"specially designed" auto sets. 

One big advantage the radio dealer 
enjoys is that his radios have nu- 
merous features that cannot be found 
in any of the sets merchandised by 
automotive manufacturers. Dual 
speakers can be purchased for almost 
any type set — dealer can install any 
kind of antenna that car owner wants 
and still be sure that set will work. 

Filters 

Various types of noise filters in the 
leading auto sets have done away 
with the need for ignition suppressors. 
At least one manufacturer (Zenith) 
is making use of the new permo- 
dynamic speakers in higher-priced 
models. 

Iron-core I.F. transformers using 
inductance tuning are used by ECA. 
Permatune permanently adjusted 
transformers are exclusive with Ar- 
vin. Tone controls are found in all 
the better sets, some of the contirm- 
ously variable type; usually the con- 
trol is mounted on the set itself. 

"Factory installation " 
fallacy 

In view of the fact that most peo- 
ple wrongly suppose that sets sold by 
auto dealers are installed at the fac- 
tory, the radio dealer can correct that 
impression and use it to his advan- 
tage. Very few of the cars are ac- 




Sturdy die-cast housiriLi — Emerson. 




Zenitij's safety no-glare dial. 



January, 1937 



19 



tually factory-equipped except on ex- 
plicit order — and in that case the 
buyer must usually wait a few weeks. 
Ordinary procedure is to equip the 
car not at the factory but locally — 
work being handled by either the 
distributor or dealer. Sometimes work 
is done by auto mechanics, or it may 
be done by a radio serviceman. 

Kadio dealer who has an expert 
serviceman can point out that his in- 
stallation is at least as good as that 
done by a mechanic and may even 



be better. So having the radio dealer 
sell and install his own brand of set 
is equal to or better than buying the 
radio with the car. 

With an expected passenger-car 
production for 1937 in excess of SY2 
million, there is big opportunity for 
the radio dealer. Deducting from the 
total those cars sold with radios still 
leaves 2V2 to 3 million prospects for 
auto radio. And in addition, the 
owners of 1934, 1935, and 1936 cars 
should not be overlooked. 



RADIOS FOR YACHTS & BOATS 



• RADIO DEALERS in shore 
and lake regions have a rapidly grow- 
ing radio-set market in owners of 
motorboats, cruisers, and yachts. In- 
terest in boats is at a peak this year 
as evidenced by the attendance at the 
New York Motorboat Show this 
month. And radios are being de- 
manded by the purchasers of these 
craft. 

A few of the larger cabin cruisers 
seen at the Show were equipped with 
auto radios — suitably installed — as 
standard equipment. On others the 
Zenith boat models were in view. 

Rich market 

While the boat market is not large 
in numbers, it represents quite a 
rich market. People who buy motor- 
boats and yachts are accustomed to 
paying three, five, and fifteen thou- 
sand dollars for their craft. Conse- 
quently a fifty to one hundred dollar 



radio is a very small percentage of 
the total cost. 

And the need for radio when on 
the water is great. After a boat leaves 
the dock it is out of communication 
with the world — there are no news- 
papers or theaters to go to. But with 
a radio the party can get the news 
reports and the wonderful programs. 
Weather reports are valuable to any 
skipper and purchases can be in- 
fluenced on that basis alone. 



Installing 



Installation of the set aboard boat 
is simple and is easily done by any 
serviceman. Antennas may take the 
form of copper screening placed in 
roof or may consist of a wire stretched 
between two elevated points. Ordi- 
nary auto sets can be huilt into the 
boat and they will provide satisfac- 
tory reception. Usually no attempt 
is made to eliminate motor ignition 




noise since the sets are not often used 
while under way. 

There are also specially designed 
radios for use on boats — these are for 
6-volt operation and consume as little 
as 1.8 amperes. 



arm-power 



plants 



OwTiers of small craft form an elite list of radio prospects. There are many 
small boats on American lakes, rivers and coasts, most of which need a radio set. 



The small portable 6-volt and 110- 
volt AC gas engine farm-power plants 
also find their use among boating en- 
thusiasts. For about 100 dollars 
it is possible to have 110 AC (300 
watts) on board any boat. The gen- 
erators are compact and easily oper- 
ated. The convenience of AC on 
board should appeal to persons who 
are appliance minded — curling irons, 
fans, electric shavers, small pumps, 
and home radio sets are only a few 
of the devices that can be operated 
with "city power." 

Even the smallest of water craft 
are radio prospects. And for those 
not having electric power there are 
the portable dry battery receivers. 
These sets have the added advantage 
that they can be carried ashore and 
used on the beach or at the camp. 

GAS STATION FRACAS 

* Dramatic pause is all that's no- 
ticed in New York City's outlet battle 
about what home sets shall be sold 
by gas stations. Sobol Bros., whose 
chain of 125 stations is primed to 
enter the business, were disturbed in 
their buying because local radio stores 
were inclined to rib their jobbers for 
selling to Sobol. These distributors 
were timid about burning bridges 
among established radio accounts. 

George Solomon, director of Sobol's 
radio division, says that makes of 
home sets have not been selected, and 
that his firm awaits legal rulings. It 
is known, however, that Sobol's have 
played with the idea of private 
brands. In fact, a representative of 
the chain flew to Chicago, contacted 
leading private-brand manufacturers, 
secured a line of receivers built to 
the standards of leading Chicago mail 
order firms which operate I'etail stores. 
Early in February, report was, these 
sets would appear in 125 gas and oil 
stations in New York at price levels 
considerably below that of current 
nationally advertised brands. But 
now plans are still up in the air! 

Short-sighted dealers may thus find 
themselves competing on a price basis 
rather than the equal basis of similar 
merchandise at list price. The gas- 
station organization has a good repu- 
tation for integrity and service. It is 
not likely that a private brand will 
reduce their volume, as they figure it. 



20 



Radio Today 




EUROPE'S RADIO FLAIR 

New designs that speak another lansuage 



RAnin FAR speaker atop this set 

nnuiu Lnii ^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^ dragged 

elsewhere in the room. 





FUN IN BED ^'"^^P* *3t listening in London is taxed "per valve." Hence 
fans use multiple (Stentorian) speakers with remote - control. 




PFRMANFNT WAVFR >s the nickname Fl ATTF^T FVFR mechanism for rec- TFA^FR IIIAI tilts to your conve- 
rtnmHntHI nHltn for a German hit rLHIIWI t»Cn ^^^ pj^yi^g j^g^^I^g ILHdUl UIHL nience and has become 

built of fancy woods plus bakelite. in a new table "combination." a popular gadget on the continent. 





DRinNR ^TYIF kept the Europeans happy some three years RFnRRAPHY I F^^RN on a "Radiobell" dial showing 
UDLUnU 01 ILL ^jgf^^g ^j^g Americans went to work on it. ULUUnHmi LLOOUII locations rather than kc. 



January, 1937 



21 



NEW THINGS FROM THE MANUFACTURERS 



Phiico receivers 



core I.F. transformers, 
models are: 



Other table 



Pilot AC-DC radio 




*■ Six new sets added to Phiico 
line. Model 62T (illustrated) is a 5- 
tube dual band superhet. Cabinet of 
walnut — size 10 x 15% x 8% inches. 
List $29.95. Other table models: 

61B 5 tube 2-band ?39.95 

89B 6 tube 2-band 39.50 

610B 5 tube 3-band 44.95 

Console models: 

61F 5 tube 2-band $49.95 
620K 6 tube 3-band 69.95 

Phiico Radio & Television Corp., 
Tioga & C Sts., Philadelphia, Pa.— 
Radio Today — See also advt. p. 6 



Westinghouse Serenader radio 




* Personal model 5 iiilie si i Avail- 
able in colors — walnut with 3-stripe 
ivory inlay; Chinese red or antique 
ivory with harmonizing strips. Model 
WR-217— list $24.85. Merchandising 
Headquarters, Westinghouse Radio, 150 
Varick St., New York, N. Y. — Radio 
Today 



RCA-Victor receivers 




* Twelve new models have been 
added to current RCA line. Model 
5T-8 (illustrated) — 5-tube dual-band 
superhet extending up to 6600 KC. 
4% watt output — tone control — 6-inch 
speaker. New type dial with 10-1 ver- 
nier. Antenna wavetrap — magnetite 



5T-1 5-tube 2-band vertical 

5T-6 5-tube 2-band horizontal 

5T-7 5-tube 2-band horizontal 

6T-5 6-tube 2-band vertical 

7T-1 7-tube 3-band vertical 



Console models: 




6K-1 


6-tube 


2-band 


6K-3 


6-tube 


3-band 


7K-1 


7-tube 


3-band 


8K-1 


8-tube 


3-band 


9K-1 


9-tube 


3-band 


9K-3 


9-tube 


3-band 


lOK-1 


lO-tube 


5-bahd 



RCA Mfg. Co., Front & Cooper Sts., 
Camden, N. J. — Radio Today — See also 
advt. p. 2 



Short-wave converters for autos 




•*■ Converters to permit short-wave 
reception on any standard auto radio. 
Model 500 covers 1600 to 6000 KC — 
especially adapted for use by law en- 
forcing agencies for reception of police 
calls. Model 600 covers 6000 to 18,000 
KC. Regular broadcast reception not 
affected when converter is not used. 
Model 500 list $21.95— model 600 $24.95. 
ABC Radio Labs., 3334 N. New Jersey 
Ave., Indianapolis, Ind. — Radio Today 



Stromberg-Carlson receivers 




* Nine tube all-wave superhet with 
acoustical labyrinth (illustrated). 
High-fidelity — tri-focal tuning — selec- 
torlite dial. Adjustable sensitivity 
control on rear of chassis. Class A 
output of 5 watts. Model 140-M. Sec- 
ond model is the 145-SP ten-tube auto- 
matic phonograph radio combination. 
130-J is an 8-tube all-wave horizontal 
table model. Stromberg-Carlson Tele- 
phone Mfg. Co., 100 Carlson Ave., 
Rochester, N. Y. — Radio Today 




• 11-tube 4-band AC-DC superhet 
with 4 watts power output. Tunes 
525-23,600 kc— cathode ray tuning In- 
dicator — selective lighting of dial. 
Dual ratio dial — RF preselector on all 
bands. Tone control — 10-inch speaker. 
Series 300. Pilot Radio Corp., 37-06 
36th St., Long Island City, N. Y.— 
Radio Today 

Troy phonograph combination 




* 5-tube AC table type radio-phon- 
ograph — tunes broadcast band. Has 
AVC and tone control. RCA pick-up 
— Webster self-starting motor. Plays 
12-inch records. Available in walnut, 
satinwood, and antique white finishes. 
Model 75PC— list $44.50. Other Troy 
sets from $14.95 to $69.95. Troy 
Radio Mfg. Co., 1142 S. Olive St., Los 
Angeles, Calif. — Radio Today 

Waterproof "B" batteries 

* Burgess "B" batteries are now 
effectively protected from cell leakage 
and outside moisture. Each cell indi- 
vidually wrapped in 3 layers of mois- 
ture-resistant paper — cells separated by 
paraffined inner layer. Prevents stray 
current losses which cause noisy recep- 
tion. Double wax seal on top and 
paraffined outside cartons. Burgess 
Battery Co., Freeport, 111. — R.\Dio To- 
day 

Electric razor filterette 

* Noise filter to use with electric 
razors — effectively squelches interfer- 
ence produced by razors. Contained in 

{Continued on page 26) 



22 



Radio Today 




This is the 

DICTOGRAPH 




/ 



...an Outstanding Sales Opportunity! 
WITH THE ACOUSTICON MYSTIC EAR 



• When you feature the Dictograph Silent Radio, you start 
from scratch. Everyone is a prospect, radio-owners as well as 
non-owners — for this radio is absolutely non-competitive com- 
pared with all the conventional loudspeaking sets on the market. 
The Dictograph Silent Radio puts into your hands a brand new 
sales argument, growing out of its ability to make listening either 
a personal experience or a group experience at the turn of a 
switch. Dealers who have appreciated this fact are reaping a 
harvest of sales; you should be one of them. 

Realize, please, that the Acousticon Mystic Ear is not an ear- 
phone or a miniature speaker. It is a newly patented device 
that employs the tonal fork principle in which 60': o of all sound 
is heard through bone conduction. No other set can achieve the 
same result — because no other set can include the Mystic Ear. 

Get the facts about this astonishing set that is revolutionizing 
the radio industry. Learn how it can build your income. 

Return the coupon today. 

DICTOGRAPH PRODUCTS COMPANY, INC. 
Executive Offices: 580 Fifth Avenue, New York. N 



The Acousticon Mystic 
Ear functions on the 
tonal fork principle. 
Hold it in your hand- 
hardly a sound. 



But put the Mystic Ear be- 
hind a pillow, lean your head 
against the pillow — and you 
hear! Remember — 60% of 
that sound is heard through 
bolt c-conduction, inaudible 
to others even a few feet 




The Tuning Fork. 
. . . Strike it! Hold 
it in the ear 1 Little 
or no sound is 
emitted. 





January, 1937 



23 



PHBHO^^I^^^ 



nW,, 



^sr^^phic^'' 




PRESTO RECORDER 

, . . reveal widespread demand foi 
a good low priced iiistniment. 
Offered to dealers only three 
months ago . . . the Presto Model D 
Recorder now rates center position 
in dealers' window and floor display 
. . . the spot reserved exclusively for 
profitable, fast moving merchandise. 

SALES RECORDS SHOW 

. . . that every school, college, radio 
station, orchestra leader, church 
and civic organization is a live 
prospect (or the recorder. 
. . . that there is good money in 
making records (or musicians, radio 
artists, public speakers, stores, hotels 
and industrial organizations. 

Gef fhe best of fhis business in your 
section! 

WRITE KOW for dealer proposition 
and tested sales promotion data. 

KJQJC. The model shotcn makes phono- 
graph records equal to any com- 
mercial record in brilliant, life- 
like reproduction of voice and 
music. It plays any record, up 
to 12". and also operates as a 
public address system. 

WORLD'S LARGEST MANUFAC- 
TURERS OF INSTANTANEOUS 
RECORDING EQUIPMENT 

PBECID 



RECORDING CORPORATION 



137 West 19th Street, New York, N. Y. 



FINER SOUND COVERAGE 



- seasonal samples of p. a. profit 
-additional installation tricks 



SOUND FOR THE THIRTY 
MILLIONS 

* Education is tlie largest indus- 
try in the United States, and it offers 
correspondingly large markets for 
radio and allied products. 

According to the Office of Educa- 
tion, Washington, D. C, the schools 
of the nation number as follows : 

5,886 junior high schools 
20,000 senior high schools 
438 junior colleges 
1,268 colleges and universities 
236,236 elementary schools 
9,992 private schools 

273,820 total instructional units 

Officials of the EGA educational 
division estimate the present total 
expenditure for education at two bil- 
lion dollars annually. They place the 
number of school buildings in use at 
180,000, housing 24,000,000 elementary 
and high-school students. Sound- 
reproducing equipment in use in 
American schools is estimated as : 

1,200 public-address systems 
60,000 phonographs 
1.000 16-ram movie projectors with 
sound 
500 35-nim movie projectors with 
sound 
16,000 radio sets 

Total student and instructor pop- 
ulation of the educational institu- 
tions of all classes is placed at a grand 
total of .30.000,000. 



SOUND PROSPECTS AFLOAT 

* Engineers at Wholesale Radio 
Service Co., Inc., JSTevy York, have 
stirred up considerable P.A. activity 
in the marine business. Technicians 
at the company have made a series of 
important shipboard installations re- 
cently and the sea-going adaptations 
of sound equipment seem on the up- 
grade. 

Among recent jobs vpas the installa- 
tion of a 20-v5'att de luxe portable sys- 
tem on a private yacht. This system 
is to be used for crew calls, re-broad- 
casting radio programs to all points 
on the ship, and paging. Included 
was a speaker horn designed for hail- 
ing passing vessels or for giving 
docking directions from the bridge. 



NEW BULLETINS 



* Available to servicemen, sound 
men and engineers is a new "Micro- 
phone Applications and Specifications 
Chart" presented as an innovation in 
technical data by Shure Bros., 225 W. 
Huron St., Chicago. Request Form 
227TK on letterhead or mention regu- 
lar distributor's name. 

■*• Electrical Amplifier Corp., 135 
West 25th St., New York City, has pre- 
pared a new catalog on its sound 
equipment. 




This plug-in office communicating system by Webster Electric, Racine, Wis., 
provides for selecting any of a number of interconnected stations. 



24 



Radio Today 



NOW "Step Up" Your Business with these New 1937 Models 



fm erson 



'RE-CREATES THE ARTIST 




Radio 



IN YOUR HOME" 




With this Dynamic Store and 

Window '"SiUnt Salesman'' 



EMKRSOX Model Z-159 
AiiiericJin~~Foreigrn— Police 
«-Tube AC Superheterodyne 

Automatic Volume Control, 
Tone Control. 3 Watts Output, 
6v^ - inch Dynamic Speaker. 
Hand-rubbed walnut cabinet 
with slanting- front panel. All 
new features. 

$44.95 

Sligluly Higher in West and South 






\irtu;illy a "sIuil' within a 
store" . . . handsome solid 
wood coiistmctloii in blue, 
gold and red ... 7 feet 
high, 8 feet wide ... an 
in-esistible background and 
demonstration display for 
the new EJIERSOX styles. 
Ask foi' details of how you 
lan get this modem mer- 
chandising- unit. 



EMERSOX Model R-13(! 

"Jliracie 5" 
American Broadcast, AH Police 
Bauds, Amateur and Aeroplane 
Stations 

.l-Tube AC Superheterodyne 
Automatic Volume Control 
Tone Control, 3 Watts Output, 
6-inch Dynamic Speaker. Hand 
rubbed walnut cabinet. 

$19.95 

Slightly Higher in West and South 




EMERSOX Model Z-160 
American— Foreign^Polioe 
G-Tube AC Superheterodyne 

Automatic Volume Control, 
Tone Control. 3 Watts Output. 
6%-inch Dynamic Speaker. 
Hand rubbed walnut cabinet. 

$39.95 

Slightly Higher in West and South 



EMERSON 1937 Plans 
Ready for Dealers — 
Get the Details Now. 




EMERSON MODEL 
R-133 

Same technical features 
as Model R - loS (at 
right). Hand rubbed 
walnut cabinet. 



$26.95 

SUshtly Uiglier ill We.st ami .Suiilli 



EMERSOX Model R-l.-.S 
American Broadcast. All Police 
Bands, Amateur and Aeroplane 
Stations. 

S-Tube AC SuperheterodTne 
-Automatic Volume Control. 
Tone Control, 3 Watts Output, 
e-inch Dynamic Speaker. Hand 
rubbed walnut cabinet. 

$29.95 

Slightly Higher in West and South 



Write or Wire Your 

Nearest Distributor — or 

Direct to Factory. 



EMERSON RADIO AND PHONOGRAPH CORPORATION 

World's Largest MaXer of Small Radios 

January, 1937 



NEW YORK, N. Y. 



25 



NEW THINGS 



(^Continued from page 22) 

a seamless aluminum housing 2% 
inches long — inserted between power 
outlet and appliance plug. For AC-DC 
lines up to 125 volts. 

Featured in the Tobe line are other 
filterettes for all types of noise reduc- 
tion. Model OB-110 is designed espe- 
cially for oil burners. Contained in 
standard cut-out cabinet — conforms to 
wiring regulations. Tobe Deutschmann 
Corp., Canton, Mass. — Radio Today 

Operadio portable sound system 



P.A. amplifier-phonograph 




* Portable 12-watt Class A sound 
system. Dual input channel for crys- 
tal mike and phonograph input. Sep- 
arate tone controls for bass and treble. 
12-inch speaker with cable and plug — 
crystal mike with 25-foot cord. Model 
115 — complete in leatherette covered 
carrying case. Operadio Mfg. Co., St. 
Charles, 111. — Radio Today — See also 
advt. p. 60 

AC-DC colored table sets 

* New color addition to Emerson 
line is the model A-130 — 6-tube super- 
het. Available in white, red, green — 
with contrasting trim. List ?24.95. 
Emerson Radio & Phonograph Corp., 
Ill Eighth Ave., New York, N. V.— 
Radio Today — See also advt. p. 25 

Portable sound system 




* 25-watt high-fidelity sound sys- 
tem using beam power output stage. 
SuflBcient gain to operate with all types 
of mikes. Mixer and tone controls. 
Model C55— list ?169 with mike. 2 12- 
inch speakers — housed in 2 black leath- 
erette carrying cases. Transformer 
Corp. of America, 29 Wooster St., New 
York, N. Y. — R.\dio Today 

Refrigerator capacitors 

*■ Complete line of exact duplicate 
replacement units for refrigerators 
and other motor driven appliances. 
Catalog with specifications on request. 
Aerovox Corp., 70 Washington St., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. — Radio Today — See 
also advt. p. 60 




* Combination 20-watt amplifier, 
phonograph turntable, 6-volt DC and 
110 AC power supply contained in port- 
able case. High-gain amplifier operates 
from all mikes. Dual channel input. 
Detachable remote control head for 
operating a distance from amplifier. 
Radolek Co., 601 W. Randolph St., Chi- 
cago, 111.- — Radio Today — See also advt. 
p. 56 

Amperex Class "B" tube 




* Hi-mu triode tube for amateur 
transmitters. Designed for Class "B" 
audio systems and for R.F. amplifiers. 
Zero bias operation up to 1250 volts — 
output 300 watts per pair. Plate dis- 
sipation of 75 watts. Requires excep- 
tionally low driving power. Type ZB 
120 — price |10. Amperex Electronic 
Products Corp., 79 Washington St., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. — Radio Today 

Recording amplifier 

* Eight-watt metal tube amplifier 
for recording. Gain of 120 DB. Uses 
phase inverter — has low and high pass 
filter arrangement operated by single 
control knob. Neon volume indicator. 
Small in size and portable — weight 12 
pounds. Universal Microphone Co., 
Inglewood, Calif. — Radio Today 

Ballast resistor replacements 

* Line of metal tube ballast re- 
sistors for replacements. A repre- 
sentative stock kit of 12 different 
types takes care of most calls with 
minimum inventory investment. Claro- 
stat Mfg. Co., Inc., 285 N. Sixth St., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. — Radio Today — See 
also advt. p. 58 

Miles sound equipment 




left is metal tube pre-amplifier for low 
level mikes. A "socket mike" is shown 
on right — this device will operate in 
conjunction with any radio set over 
the power lines within a building. 
Miles Reproducer Co., Inc., 114 W. 14th 
St., New York, N. Y. — Radio Today 

Fada colored sets 

* Complete line of colored sets — 
5, 6, 7-tube models — AC and AC-DC 
operatiom Moulded cabinets in fol- 
lowing colors — walnut, ivory, black, 
Chinese red. Gold or chromium trim 
on some sets. Model 250 in black with 
gold trim— list ?39.95— has 5-tube AC 
chassis. Fada Radio & Electric Co., 
30-20 Thomson Ave., Long Island City, 
L. I., N. Y. — Radio Today — See also 
advt. p. 5 



Tru-Tan crystal pick-up 




*• Quality crystal pick-up with off- 
set head which holds the needle when 
playing a 12-inch record practically 
true to tangent of the circle at all 
points — maximum error never exceed- 
ing 1%°. Gives better reproduction 
and longer record life. Double row 
ball bearing base swivel. Finished in 
black with chrome trimmings. Astatic 
Tru-Tan model B— list ?17.50. Astatic 
Microphone Laboratory, Inc., Youngs- 
town, Ohio — R.\Dio Today 

Magnavox auditorium speaker 




■*■ New line of Miles equipment in- 
cludes pre-amplifiers, intercommunicat- 
ing systems, P.A. systems, microphones 
and other sound items. Illustrated on 



* Heavy-duty 15-inch electro-dy- 
namic speaker — handles 25 watts aver- 
age power. Curvilinear cone with 2- 
inch voice coil. Field excitation from 
10 to 25 watts. 3 models: standard — 
response up to 5000 cycles; high fre- 
quency covering up to 8000 cycles; low 
frequency covering 30 to 2500 cycles. 
Available with output transformer. 
Model 505 DC list ?42.50. AC excited- 
model 525 AC. Magnavox Co., Fort 
Wayne, Ind. — R.adio Today 

Arcadia receivers 

* Eleven-tube AC console — 3-band 
coverage from 528-18,300 kc. Phantom 
light dial using beams of light instead 
of pointers to indicate tuning and po- 
sition of volume and tone controls. 
Metal tube — dual speed tuning — hi-fi 
switch. Model 30EL674. Other Ar- 
cadia models from 5 to 13 tubes. 
Wells-Gardner & Co., 2701 N. Kildare 
Ave., Chicago, 111. — Radio Today 



26 



Radio Today 




ISOUiNTITE 



CERAMIC INSULATORS 



January, 1937 



27 



ifctfl 



' i|tj^^ g^r 



Iff*.' 



^ 



^: d^^ 



tmsStSSm 






ill / 

■ill : 






-4 in 



CHECK LIST FOR 
THE UP-TO-DATE 



RADIO SERVICE SHOP 




MUSTS 



All-wave antenna system & line filter 

Multi-range volt-ohm-mil meter AC-DC 

Calibrated all-wave R.F. signal generator 

Output meter or visual indicator 

Tube checker 

Vacuum tube voltmeter 

Cathode ray oscillograph with wobbler 

Assortment of meters 

Condenser tester 

Loudspeaker with universal trans. & field 

Service manuals or bulletins 

Subscription to RADIO TODAY 

Speaker shims 

Set neutralizing tools 

Tuning wand 

Polish kit 

Test leads & probers — clips 

Adapters 

75 watt soldering iron with offset tips 

Flashlight 

Rubber mallet 



DESIRABLE 

■ Audio frequency oscillator 

■ Auto transformer for low voltage tests 

■ Shielded test room 

■ Impedance bridge (R, L, C tests) 

■ Spare power supply 

■ Spare audio system or P. A. amp. 

■ Turntable & pick-up 

■ Standard frequency records 

■ Condenser box 

■ Headphones 

■ Crystal calibrator (oscillator) 

■ Wattmeter 

m Resistance indicator or decade 
I Vibrator tester & storage battery 
Reference books 



Color coding outfit 
Auto cable repair unit 
Tube pullers 
Eyelet riveter & anvil 
200 watt soldering iron 
Parts cabinets 



Long nose pliers ■ Thin nose pliers 

Gas pipe pliers ■ Oblique pliers 

Diagonal cutting pliers 

End cutlinj nippers ■ Wire stripper 

Set of Flat wrenches Vi to % 

Set of socket wrenches with offset 

Set of screw drivers 

Screw holding screw driver 

Offset screw drivers 

Assortment of drills and hand drill 

Bench vise ■ Hack saw 

Cold chisels ■ File assortment 

Hammers 



■ Tap wrench & taps 4 36, 6 32, 8 32, 

■ Drills for above taps 

■ Dies and holder — same sites as above 

■ Circle cutter 

■ Electric drill 

■ Grinding wheel & motor 



Tin snips 
Wire gauge 
Box wrenches 
Extension cord and light 
for auto radio servicing 



COPYRIGHT 1936 

RADIO 
TODAY 



OrMajLCentralal) 

btocjdcasts- ^ 




^ I ^ HAT genial chap . . . 
the friend of service- 
men and experimenters 
takes time out to remind 
you that every control 
problem can be met (bet- 
ter and easier) with 
CENTRALAB CON- 
TROLS. Smoother — be- 
cause of the long, no- 
rubbing contact, they give 
"profitable" service for a 
long time. 

Change to 
Centralab 



A mere handful 
will service 
praefically any 
set — old or new 




pL'ery RaJio Str-c'ite lilan 



Centsalab 



Milifvaukee, Wis. 

BRITISH CENTRALAB. Ltd. 

Canterbury Road, Kilburn 

London. N.W. 6, England 

FRENCH CENTRALAB CO. 

118 Avenue Ledru-Rollin 

Paris XI. France 

Fixed Resistors 

Volume Controls 

Wave Change Switches 

Sound Projection Controls 



UP-TO-DATE SERVICE BENCH 

Sussestions For a well-equipped shop 



* Pictured on the preceding page 
is a suggested layout for a modern 
radio service bench designed first with 
the idea of having all instruments 
and tools in a handy location, and 
at the same time having as much 
equipment as possible on display in 
order to impress the customers. The 
second thought in the design is to 
have a minimum amount of instru- 
ments on the work bench and, yet, 
keeping all of them within easy reach. 
Hence oscillators, multi-meters and 
the like are fitted into recesses in 
the panel, while tools are mounted 
on the surface. Even when the Job 
requires equipment of the portable 
type, this construction is very satis- 
factor,y for when the instruments are 
needed away from the service bench 
they can be easily lifted out. 

Much drawer space has been pro- 
vided in the design for tools that 
are used infrequentl.y, spare parts, 
and other items that are not suited 
for mounting on the panel. A solder- 
ing iron holder constructed from a 
piece of iron pipe and wrapped in 
asbestos paper is mounted below the 
horizontal cross-piece. An ample 
supply of electric outlets is included 
in the design for both sets and test 
equipment. The power line connec- 
tion for the set should pass through 
a line filter to remove electrical inter- 
ference. 

On the page also is a check-list for 
the serviceman — this list is separated 
into two columns, musis and de- 
sirables. After much research and 
interviews with many servicemen, a 
collection of mxists was evolved. It 
is not our idea to state that a service 
shop should have every instrument 
listed — in many cases combinations 
or. "service labs" are used which in- 
corporate many of the items on the 
check-list. 

Servicemen naturally have prefer- 
ences as to types of equipment, and 
methods of working. While we show 
both the oscillograph and the vacuum 
tube voltmeter on our "must" list, it 
is obvious that both are not required. 
One man who favors visual study 
of wave form and alignment will re- 
gard the oscillograph as a "must," 
whereas the vacuum tube voltmeter 
would be the "must" for another man 
— both preferences being based on 
the actual experience. 

At the bottom of the page is a 



compilation of tools that the service- 
man should have. Particularly im- 
portant is a set of flat and socket 
wrenches. A-1 service practice dic- 
tates that wrenches be used for all 
nuts instead of pliers — in addition 
the use of wrenches actually saves 
time. The use of pliers should be re- 
served for holding parts and cutting 
wires. Chisels are extremely handy 
for cutting off rivets, and their use is 
preferable to drilling out the rivets. 
And if you don't want to chew up 
the screw heads — there should be a 
screw driver to fit every size screw. 

In the desirable column are listed 
a large number of test instruments 
that will save time and enable the 
serviceman to make tests that would 
otherwise be impossible. An audio 
oscillator or an electric phonograph 
outfit with frequency records will 
make it possible to test the audio fre- 
quency response of receivers and 
sound systems. The shielded test 
room (illustrated on page 36) when 
properly constructed will etlectively 
keep out all static and electrical noise, 
thereby permitting checks on noise 
and sensitivity. 

The crystal controlled oscillator is 
very helpful in accurately determining 
frequencies — it provides a means of 
checking the calibration on the sig- 
nal generator. A wattmeter test on 
power transformers is of value in de- 
termining short circuits and other 
power suppl.y troubles. 

Reference books if read and studied 
are the backbone of the serviceman's 
knowledge. There are books written 
especially for the service trade and 
others used as text books in radio. 
Both are to be highly recommended. 

MICROPHONICS, NOISE 

* Service note from Emerson 
points out that trimmer condenser 
screws should always be tight. "Never 
leave a trimmer with the outside plate 
so loose that there is no tension on 
the screw. Either bend up the plate 
or remove the screw. Loose screws 
are a source of noise, frequency drift 
and microphonism." 

* Please turn to page 49 and reg- 
ister your vote on what items you 
feel should be included in manufac- 
turers' service manuals. All you have 
to do is check the questions on a form 
and mail to Radio Today. 



30 



Radio Today 



AGAIN IN 1937 -it's CROSLEY! 

THE COMPLETE RADIO LINE ... THE PROFITABLE RADIO LINE 




MODEL C-516-5 TUBES 
AC- DC Superiieterodyne Radio 

Two Diial-Purpose Tubes . . . Airplane-Type Dial, 
calibrated in both meters and kilocycles . . . Tuning 
Range, 540-1725 Kc. ... 5" Dynamic Speaker. 
No Ground Required . . . Solid Ma- 
hogany Cabinet . . . Litz-wound 
tenna coils and other exclusive features. 



$1695 




FIVER-5 TUBES 

2 Bands . . . 540-4000 Ko. 
C o n t i n u o 11 s . . . 5" 
Speaker... CIOQQ 
3H Watts dl H1I9 
Output. ^ ■ W 



MODEL 525-5 TUBES 

2 Bands . . . 540-tOOO Kc. 
Continuous. ..5" 

3 ?r Watts $9500 

Output. ^""W 





MODEL 529-5 TUBES 

2 Bands . . . .'510-4000 Kc. 
C o n t i n u o u s . . . 5" 
Speaker... C4A0C 
3K Watts i>/S993 
Output. ^"W 



MODEL 629-8 TUBES 

American-Foreign . . .540- 
1710 Kc. 2350-7000 Kc... 
6" Speaker 
... 4 Watts 
Output. 




The new 1937 Crosley Radio Line has everything ... a complete 
group of models covering every price range . . . beautiful designs 
. . .superlative performance. . .new, advanced features that in- 
clude the exclusive Crosley Auto-E.xpressionator, the Mystic 
Hand, and a dozen other equally sensational featiu-es . . . and 
greater doUar-for-doUar value. That explains the pronounced 
swing to Crosley by the radio-buying public. . . that's why experi- 
enced dealers everywhere are clamoring for the Crosley Fran- 
chise. Swing in behind the leader and sell Crosley, the radio that 
has everything. See your Crosley Distributor for complete details. 

TUBE FOR TUBE... FEATURE FOR FEATURE... COMPARE THESE 
1937 CROSLEY VALUES WITH ANYTHING ON THE MARKET! 





Model B49 Cansole-{ Tubes Model 759 Console— 7 Tubes Model 789 Console— 7 Tubes Model 989 Console— 9 Tubes 



American-Foreipn ... 540- Continuous Coverage . . . Continuous Coverage . . 
1710Kc.,6000-l«.000Kc... 540-18.000 Kc. . . . 12" 540-18,000 Kc. . . . 12 



5' 2 Watts $59'^ 



12"Speaker 



Output. 



Speaker . . 
6 Watts 
Output. 



$6750 



Speaker 
6 Watts 
Output. 



$7995 



Conlinuous Coverage . . . 
540-18.000 Kc. . . . 12" 

fpii'rtts $9950 

Output. '"' 




Model 1199 Consale-11 Tubes Model1211 Console-12Tubes 

Continuous Coverage . . . 

540-18,000 Kc. . . . ir" 

Speaker. 

25 Watts 

Output. 



Continuous Coverage . . . 
540-18,000 Kc. . . . 12" 

ln^i.Vt410950 

Output. ■ '»*' 



$12950 



Model 1313 Console-13 Tubes 



Continuous Coverage . 

540-18.000 Kc. . . - 15" 

Speaker... 

25 Watts » 

Output. 



$14950 



Model 1518 Console-15 Tubes 

Continuous Coverage . . . 
540-18,000 Kc. . . . 15" 

fn^aVts $17450 

Output. ^ ■ ■ T^ 



^^•lUHnTEUERHRPPEllS 
VOU'RE THERE WITH R 



[ROSLEV 




THE CROSLEY RADIO CORPORATION - 



CINCINNATI 



POWEL CROSLEY, .Tr., President 
Home of WLW — "the Nation ■*» Station" — 70 on your dial. 

(Prices slightly higher in Florida, Texas, Rocky Mountain Stales and west.) 



January, 1937 



31 





FOR 





RADIO CORPORATION OF A:P(I 

EVERYTHING IN RADIO FOR SERVICE IN GOMMfc 



\DIO AT 
ITS BEST! 



Radio Corporation of America sponsors matinee 
broadcasts of Metropolitan Opera every Saturday 

IN the realm of music, opera is royalty. And king of music's 
royal family is the Metropolitan Opera Company. To sing on 
its stage in New York is the ambition of every operatic per- 
former. To hear the musical masterpieces produced there is the 
desire of every music lover. 

The Radio Corporation of America now makes it possible for 
all America to enjoy the Metropolitan Opera during the current 
season. Saturday matinee performances are broadcast direct from 
the Metropolitan Opera House stage, over NBC's nationwide 
Blue network. These broadcasts bring to every American family 
the world's most magnificent music. 

RCA's service is universal 

RCA, the only organization which actively participates in every 
branch of radio, contributes largely to the comfort and well-being 
of thousands the world over each day. It provides the most rapid 
means of communication. It links the sky and the sea and the land. 
Its broadcasting facilities bring entertainment, news and education. 

These RCA services signify public confidence in the RCA 
name — the sort of confidence that creates good-wiil for every 
merchant handling RCA products. And this latest service — broad- 
cast of the opera — is another good-will measure that will benefit 
all associated with the name of RCA. 

RCA stands for radio — soundly engineered. Its past achieve- 
ments prove this. And RCA sound engineering is some day going 
to bring radio sight to the world's millions! 



RCA MANUFACTURING CO., Inc. • RCA COMMUNICATIONS, Inc. 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING CO., Inc. • RCA INSTITUTES, Inc. 

RADIOMARINE CORPORATION OF AMERICA 



6 Ways the Metropolitan 

Broadcast can Increase 

Sales for You 

1 It will send people into your 
store for their free copies 

ot the "Story of the Opera." 

O There will be strong com- 
mercials on Magic Voice, 
Magic Brain, Magic Eye, Metal 
Tube radios, phonograph 
radios and Victor Records. 

2 No other radio manufac- 
^ turer h^ a coast-to-coast 
program — RCA has two for 
you. . . the Metropolitan Opera 
and the Magic Key. 

/ The Opera broadcast 
^ maintains the traditional 
association between the Met- 
ropolitan Opera and RCA 
Victor — making you the mu- 
sical leader of the community. 

C It stimulates interest in 
■^ good music, good instru- 
ments and Red Seal Victor 
Records. 

6 Finally, RCA has a splen- 
did MERCHANDISING 
PLAN that will draw 500,000 
listeners to radio and music 
shops. Get the details from 
your RCA Victor distributor. 



Listen also to ""The Magic Key 
of RCA" every Sunday, 2 to 
3 P. M., E. S. T., on the NBC 
Blue Network. 



ERICA • Radio City • NEW YORK 



IGATIONS . . . BROADCASTING . . . RECEPTION 



V: 



■ 




FOR Radio at 



ITS BEST! 



Radio Corporation of America sponsors matinee 
broadcasts of Metropolitan Opera every Saturday 

IN the realm of music, opera is royalty. And king of music's 
royal family is the Metropolitan Opera Company. To sing on 
its stage in New York is the ambition of every operatic per- 
former. To hear the musical masterpieces produced there is the 
desire of every music lover. 

The Radio Corporation of America now makes it possible for 
all America to enjoy the Metropolitan Opera during the current 
season. Saturday matinee performances are broadcast direct from 
the Metropolitan Opera House stage, over NBC's nationwide 
Blue network. These broadcasts bring to every American family 
the world's most magnificent music. 

RCA's service is universal 

RCA, the only organization which actively participates in every 
branch of radio, contributes largely to the comfort and well-being 
of thousands the world over each day. It provides the most rapid 
means of communication. It links the sky and the sea and the land. 
Its broadcasting facilities bring entertainment, news and education. 

These RCA services signify public confidence in the RCA 
name — the sort of confidence that creates good-will for every 
merchant handling RCA products. And this latest service — broad- 
cast of the opera — is another good-will measure that will benefit 
all associated with the name of RCA. 

RCA stands for radio — soundly engineered. Its past achieve- 
ments prove this. And RCA sound engineering is some day going 
to bring radio sight to the world's millions! 

RCA MANUFACTURING CO., Inc. . RCA COMMUNICATIONS, Inc. 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING CO., Inc. . RCA INSTITUTES, Inc. 

RADIOMARINE CORPORATION OF AMERICA 



6 Ways the Metropolitan 

Broadcast can Increase 

Sales for You 

1 ItwUl send people into your 
store for their free copies 

of the "Story of the Opera." 

2 There will be strong com- 
mercials on Magic Voice, 

Magic Brain, Magic Eye, Metal 
Tube radios, phonograph 
radios and Victor Records. 

2 No other radio manufac- 
-^ turer h^f a coast-to-coast 
program — RCA has two for 
you. . . the Metropolitan Opera 
and the Magic Key. 

/ The Opera broadcast 
^ maintains the traditional 
association between the Met- 
ropolitan Opera and RCA 
Victor — making you the mu- 
sical leader of the community. 

C It stimulates interest in 
-^ good music, good instru- 
ments and Red Seal Victor 
Records. 

6 Finally, RCA has a splen- 
did MERCHANDISING 
PLAN that will draw 500,000 
listeners to radio and music 
shops. Get the details from 
your RCA Victor distributor. 



Listen also to "The Magic Key 
of RCA ' every Sunday, 2 to 
3 P. M., E. S. T., on the NBC 
Blue Network. 



RADIO 



CORPORATION OF AMERICA • Radio City • NEW YORK 

EVERYTHING IN RADIO FOR SERVICE IN COMM ICATIqns . . . BROADCASTING . . . RECEPTION 



UNDERSTANDING NEW RADIO CIRCUITS 

Novel cathode ray tuning eye circuit — direct-coupled phase inverter 



STROMBERG-CARLSON TRIFOCAL 
TUtJING EYE CIRCUIT 

* An improvement over the ordi- 
nary cathode ray tuning indicator 
circuit has been made by Stromberg- 
Carlson in their tri-focal tuning sys- 
tem. Eye is sensitive to weak signals, 
yet does not overlap on extremely 
strong stations. Circuit used is rela- 
tively simple and does not require 
use of extra amplifiers or controls. 

Fig. 1 shows the wiring of the 6E5 
circuit in skeleton form for simplic- 
ity. While a 6H6 tube is shown in 
the diagram, a 6Q7 is used in some 
of the sets with slight modification. 

The cathode of the 6E5 is connected 
to the cathode terminal (Point D) 
of an uncontrolled I.E. amplifier tube. 
In this way the 6E6 always has its 
cathode at plus 7 volts. The grid of 
the tuning eye tube is connected to the 
cathode (Point A) of an AVC con- 
trolled tube. 

When the set is oil tune, the I.E. 
amplifier is working at full gain — the 
negative grid bias is minimum and 
the cathodes of Hie controlled ampli- 
fiers are at 7 volts. Note that thp 
control grids of the tubes are returned 
to the cathode resistor at plus 4 volts 
(Point B) through the AVC circuit, 
giving an effective grid bias of — 3 
volts. 

When a signal is tuned in, the AVC 
diode develops a negative bias which 




6E5 tuning eye circuit with a high sen- 
sitivity on small signals — non-overload 
on large signals. 



is applied to the amplifier tubes. 
With the increased bias, the plate cur- 
rent of the controlled amplifier tubes 
decreases — consequently the voltage 
Point A falls; this creates a potential 
difference between A and D. As re- 
sult, the eye closes as the voltage of 
A decreases — A goes negative with 
respect to D. The minimum to which 
A can fall is zero volts — the case 
where the AVC bias has caused com- 
plete cut-off of plate current. This 
means that the maximum negative 
grid potential that can be applied to 
the 6E5 is 7 volts which is just 
enough to close the eye. 

The cathode of the AVC diode is 
connected to Point D so that a "de- 
lay" bias is provided for the AVC 
circuit. 

In brief, we have the 6E5 tube 
connected across two points. D and A, 
the potential of which can vary from 
at no signal to — 7 at maximum 
signal. Point D is fixed while A is 
variable. 

DIRECT COUPLED AMPLIFIER 
WITH PHASE INVERTER 

* New type of circuit is used in 
an amplifier developed by the Ampli- 
fier Co. of America. Amplifier is 
entirely direct coupled with the ex- 
ception of the input and output trans- 
formers. 

Illustrated is the phase inverter cir- 
cuit which is direct-coupled, utilizing 
no coupling condensers. A 6C5 phase 
inverter tube is used — the load resist- 
ance being divided into two equal re- 
sistances, Ep and Ek. This inverter 
acts similar to any of the 6C5 in- 
verters used in receivers (described on 
page 42 of August Eadio Today) — 
the unusual feature is the method of 
coupling, which is non-reactive. 

Direct coupling is theoretically 
nothing more than cascading one am- 
plifier stage after another without any 
blocking condensers. The grid of 
each successive stage goes to the plate 
of the preceding tube. Since there 
are no direct current blocking con- 
densers or transformers to isolate the 
direct current voltages, the voltages 
used in each stage become higher and 
higher with respect to ground. 

The voltages to ground on the vari- 
ous stages are not according to Hoyle ; 
but if each tube is considered by it- 




Non-reactive phase inverter for direct 
coupled amplifiers. 



self, taking the cathode as the start- 
ing point, it will be seen that the grid, 
plate and screen voltages for each 
particular tube with reference to its 
cathode are correct. 

Because of the fact that no con- 
densers or transformers are used for 
coupling the layout design of an direct 
coupled amplifier becomes somewhat 
involved, particularly when phase in- 
version is necessary for push-pull oper- 
tion. The voltage on any one element of 
a tube is dependent upon the voltages 
of all the other tube elements in the 
amplifier. The following is a brief 
explanation of the voltage relation- 
ships in the amplifier. 

The grid of the 6C5 driver is at 65 
volts while the cathode is at 75 — 
thusly the grid is the required 10 volts 
negative. The grids of the 6L6 out- 
put tubes are connected to the cathode 
and plate of the 6C5. Since the plate 
of the 6C5 is 100 volts more positive 
than the cathode, the grid of the up- 
per 6L6 is 100 volts more positive 
than the grid of the lower 6L6. In 
order to preserve the proper voltage 
relationships, then all the voltages on 
the upper 6L6 must be 100 volts 
higher than those of the other 6L6. 

Note how an output transformer 
with two windings is used. This is 
done so that 600 volts can be put on 
one tube and 500 on the other. By 
making the cathodes 200 and 400 volts 
respectively, the operating plate volt- 
age of each tube is only 400, which 
is the rated potential. And the 6L6 
grids are each 25 volts less than the 
cathode — in this way the grids are 
operated at the 25 volt negative bias 
called for. An 8 mfd. condenser is 
connected between the 6L6 cathodes 
so that they will be at the same audio 
frequency potential. 



34 



Radio Today 



i?-3> 






►.*"!> 



iB 









0^ 



%«»r..vVO. 



>■'.,s-^o^• 



January, 1937 



35 



p^. 



YOU PAY 
FOR THEM 




Even If You Don t 
Have Them! 



If you're trying to service today's 
complicated radios without com- 
plete service information — if you're 
wasting time running to your jobber 
to use his manuals — you are paying 
a high price in time and money for 
"getting along" without a complete 
set of Rider Manuals. It's actually 
costing you money NOT to have them'. 

Be sure you have all necessary 
circuit information WHEN YOU 
NEED IT. Be sure your set of Rider 
Manuals is complete. Order any miss- 
ing volumes from your jobber today. 

VOLUME VII— JUST OUT 
1600 PAGES, $10.00 - COVERING 1936-1937 



Volume A'l 
A'oliiiiie V 
A'oliime IV 
Volume III 
A'oliime II 
Volume I 



¥7.50 eoverinjjT 
7.."50 " 

7..'>0 " 

7.50 " 

6.50 
7..'50 



lOSS-.tC 
1934-3.-. 
1933-34 
1932-33 
1931-32 
1920-31 



. that goes for these Rider Books, too! 



THE CATHODE-RAY 
TUBE AT WORK 
Complete, practical in- 
formation on oscillo- 
graphs, etc 
pps., 450 illus. 



Hour a Day With Rider 
ON RESONANCE 
& ALIGNMENT 
You need this! 96 pps. 
4S illus.: hard Cnn 

cover; on'y *'"'' 



Hour a Day With Rider 
ON DC DISTRIBUTION 
in Radio Receivers. 
How DC voltages are 
led to tube elements, 
etc. 96 pps. 69 Cfln 
illus.; hard cov. ""'' 



SERVICING 
SUPERHETERODYNES 
Make repairs on con- 
stantly changing super- 
hets at profitable t1 nfj 
speed. 2SS pps. *'•"" 



Hour a Day With Rider 
ON AUTOMATIC 
VOLUME CONTROL 
will speed up your 
AVC work. 96 pps., CHp 
65 illus.; hard cover "'"' 



SERVICING RECEIV- 
ERS BY MEANS 
OF RESISTANCE 
MEASUREMENT 
Tells how to use Ohm- 
eter. 203 pps., CI (1(1 
93 illus. f'-"" 



Sold by a// good radio jobbers 

JOHN F. RIDER, Publisher 



1440 Broadway 



New York City 



RID 

ShSliCllillOOiil 

NOW IM Xfl'iT.W VOLUMES 



SERVICE NOTES 



CORRECTING OVERLOADS 

* Many of the smaller sets not 
having AVC have a tendency to over- 
load when operated in the vicinity ol 
powerful broadcast stations. It is 
evidenced b,y blocking out of the sig- 
nal as the volume control is advanced. 

An automatic overload control can 
be incorporated in most of these sets 
by making the simple changes illus- 
trated in the accompanying diagram. 
Originally the grid returns of the I.F. 
and 2nd detector tubes go direct to 
ground. These should be removed 
from ground, tied together and re- 
turned to ground through a 1 meg- 
ohm resistor, which is shunted with 
a .01 mfd. or larger capacitor. 

This information suggested by In- 
ternational Radio Corp. for their 
models 53 and 553 is applicable to 
other sets employing a similar cir- 
cuit. In making this change on the 
Kadette receivers be sure that the 
cathode of the 6J7 tube is connected 
as shown and not left connected to 
the low end of the second I.F. trans- 
former grid winding. 

SHIELDED TEST ROOM 

* With the increase of short-wave 
and highly-sensitive receivers and the 
tendency to move broadcasting sta- 
tions into more populous areas, there 




Suggested circuit changes for incor- 
porating automatic overload control in 
small sets. 

is a great need for properly shielded 
test rooms. These test booths effec- 
tively remove all outside electrical 
noises, prevent pick-up of strong local 
stations. When all external pick-up 
has been eliminated, it is obvious that 
any noise in the set is then caused by 
internal defects — only with a shielded 
room is it possible to effectively find 
and cure such difficulties. 

The construction of a suitable 
shielded test room is a comparatively 
simple job for the serviceman who is 
the least bit handy with carpenters' 
tools. Pictured herewith is a room 
having a wooden frame. 

In order to keep out external pick- 
(To page 40) 




The shielded test room is rapidly becoming one of the "must" items for the service 
shop. This one is easily constructed, using a wooden frame. 



36 



Radio Today 



I \ It's goin§ to be a 




NIEB 



But not for the Dealers 
Who Sell Sylvanias! 

• There'll be more radios played in 
the U.S. this winter than ever before. 
That means more sets to service . . . 
more tubes to sell! 

You can build a better all-around 
year-round, steady business with 
the right kind of tube. It pays to 
sell Sylvania ! 

Here's why: No kick -backs. 
You're protected and your custom- 



ers are kept satisfied because 
Sylvania stands in back of every 
tube it makes. They're guaranteed, 
and tested eighty separate times 
before they leave the factory! 

Fair list prices, also for your pro- 
tection. Sales and technical aids 



man who sells Sylvania .. .twelve 
months a year. They'll tell you that 
Sylvania is playing ball with the 
dealer! 

Get to know Sylvania NOW! You 
can get FREE . . . full technical and 
sales information by writing to the 



from topnotch engineering and pro- Hygrade Sylvania Corporation, 

motional departments. And ask any Emporium, Pa. 

SYLVANIA 



THE SET-TESTED RADIO TUBE 



January, 193' 



37 



Model 
Chassis 



I. F. I Model 
Peak Chassis 



I. F. 
Peak 



BELMONT* 

Continued from 

December 

RADIO TODAY 

746A 465— RC 

750 175— RC 

755 465— RC 

770 465— RC 

775 370— RC 

777A 465— RC 

777B 465— RC 

777C 465— RC 

778A 465— RC 

786A 465— RC 

787 465— RC 

845 465— RC 

856 465— RC 

878 465— RC 

879 465— RC 
880D 465— RC 
880A 175— RC 
880B 175— RC 
880C 465— RC 
880D 465— RC 
822 465— RC 
1050 175— RC 
1070A 465— RC 
1070B 465— RC 
1077 465— RC 
1170 465— RC 
1172 465— RC 

BOSCH 

See Amer. Bosch 

BROWNING- 
DRAKE 

40 175 

80 175 

BRUNSWICK 

3 NC 8 180 

3 NW 8 180 

5 NC 8 180 

11 175 

12 175 

16 175 

17 175 

24 175 

25 175 
33, 33AC 175 
AVC-D 175 

BUICK 

See United Motors 

BULOVA 

600 175 

601 175 
605 175 
610 175 
C 751 175 
G 781 175 
M 701 175 

CADILLAC* 
LA SALLE 

06-W 262 

55-X 175 

56-KB 175 

56-R 175 

56-Q 175 

56-S2 175 

56-T2 262.5 

56-U2 262.5 

56-Vl 262.5 

072 262 

2029 175 

2030 175 
2772 262 

CANADIAN 

sets will be listed 

after completion 

of Americail. 

CAPE HART* 

50-E 465 

51-E 465 

60-E 465 

61-E 465 

99 465 

200 175 

202 465 

204-E 465 

205-E 465 

300 175 

301-C 465 

301-CAW 465 

302-D 465 

304-E 465 

305-E 465 

400-B 180 

400-BAW 465 

400-C 465 

400-CAW 465 

402-B 180 

402-BAW 465 

402-C 465 

402-CAW 465 

404-B 180 

404-BAW 465 

404-C 465 



CAPE HART* 
(Continued) 



404-CAW 

404-D 

404-E 

405-D 

405-E 

406-D 

406-E 

407-E 

500-E 

B 

BAW 

C 

CAW 

CK 

D 

E 

E-1 



465 
465 
465 
465 
465 
465 
465 
465 
465 
180 
465 
465 
465 
175 
465 
465 
465 



Remote control sets 
have "R" added to 
model number. 

CAR-LECTRIC 

110 AC-6 volt 175 



16, 16A 

17 

19 

27. 27 A 

110 

llOA 

610 

610R 

710 

710A 

710AR 

713 

713A 

713AR 

714 

714A 

714AR 

715 

715A 

715AR 

716 

716A 

716AR 

718 

718A 

718AR 

719 

719A 

719AR 

915 

916 

917 

918 

1015 

1015R 

1016 

1017 

1017R 

1931C 

1941 

1981 

7113 

7113R 

7170 

7170A 

LI 9 

L27 



262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 
262- 



-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 
-RC 



CENTRAL 
RADIO CORP. 

261 175 

560 256 

561 256 

CHAMPION* 

52 456 — R 

52-DWG 456— R 

500 456— R 

501 456— R 
523-G 465— R 

557 175— R 

558 175— R 

600 175— R 

601 175— R 
633-G 465— R 
811 465— R 
1471-E 465 — R 
4169-H 465— R 
6320 465— R 

CHEVROLET* 

364441 262— R 

600566 262— R 

601038 175— R 

601574 175— R 

600565 262— R 

600249 262— R 

601176 262— R 

601177 622— R 
601662 262— R 
601814 262— R 
985100 262— R 
985200 262— R 

985300 262— R 

985301 260— R 
985400 262— R 



I. F. PEAKS 



and 



COLOR CODING 



INSTALLMENT 111— RADIO TODAY, JANUARY, 1937 



Model 
Chassis 



I. F. Model 
Peak Chassis 



CLARION* 

25-85 175— RC 

25-90 175— RC 

25-91 175— RC 

25-94 175— RC 

25-100 175— RC 

25-140 175— RC 

25-160 175— RC 

25-220 175— RC 

25-240 175— RC 

25-260 175— RC 

25-280 175— RC 

80 175— RC 

81 175— RC 

83 175— RC 

84 175— RC 

85 175— RC 
90. 90A 175 — RC 

91 175— RC 

92 175— RC 

94 175— RC 

95 175— RC 

96 175— RC 

100 175— RC 
lOOAR 465— RC 

101 175— RC 

110 175— RC 

111 175— RC 

120 175— RC 

121 175— RC 

130 175— RC 

131 175— RC 

139 175 — RC 

140 175— RC 
150 175— RC 
160 175— RC 

170 175— RC 

171 175— RC 
200 1.000— RC 
220 175 — RC 
230 175— RC 

240 490— RC 

241 175— RC 
260 175— RC 
270 175— RC 
280 175— RC 
290 175— RC 
300 175— RC 

320 175— RC 

321 175— RC 

322 175— RC 
340 175— RC 
360 175— RC 
420 175— RC 

422 465— RC 

423 465— RC 
425 465— RC 
440 465 — RC 

450 465— RC 

451 465— RC 

470 465— RC 

471 465— RC 

472 465— RC 

490 175— RC 

500 175— RC 

AC 80 175 — RC 

AC 81 175— RC 

AC 84 175— RC 

AC 85 175— RC 

AC 90 175— RC 

AC 91 175— RC 

AC 94 175— RC 

AC 100 175— RC 

AC 140 175— RC 

AC 160 175 — RC 

AC 220 175— RC 

AC 240 175— RC 

AC 260 175— RC 

AC 280 175— RC 

TC 1 262— RC 

TC 2 262— RC 



I. F. 
Peak 



CLARION* 

(Continued) 

TC 15 175— RC 
TC 20 456— RC 
TC 21 465— RC 
TC 31 456— RC 
TC 50 175— RC 

T*!" CIO J 115 — RC 

TC 60 456— RC 

CLIMAX* 

110 456— RC 

115 465— RC 

D8 456— RC 

G4 456— RC 

H5 456— RC 

J6 456— RC 

JE7 456— RC 

K6 456 — RC 

L91 456— RC 

M8 456 — RC 

ME9 456 — RC 

ME17 456— RC 



COLONIAL* 
(GRAYBAR) 

90 175— R 

94 175— R 

100 175— R 

106 175— R 

106B 175— R 

119 175— R 

128A 175— R 

128B 175— R 

129 175— R 

147 175— R 

150 480— R 

164 175— R 

164B 175— R 

173 175— R 

178 175 — R 

182 175 — R 

182B 175- R 

222 445— R 

227 480— R 

231 480— R 

232 480— R 
235 480— R 

237 480— R 

238 480— R 

239 480— R 
240AC 490— R 
242 480— R 
250 175— R 
250 AC 175— R 
250AC-DC 175— R 
252 480— R 
265 175— R 
279 175— R 
279 AC 175— R 
300 175— R 
300AC 175— R 

300 AC- DC 175— R 

301 175— R 
301AC 175— R 
400 175 — R 

500 175— R 
500AC 175— R 

501 175— R 
501AC 175— R 

600 175— R 
600A 175— R 

601 175— R 

602 175— R 

603 480— R 

604 445— R 

605 175— R 

650 175— R 

651 480— R 



•Indicates that the listings have been checked by the manufacturer. 



Model 
Chassis 



I. F. 
Peak 



COLONIAL* 
(Continued) 

652 480— R 

653 480— R 

654 480— R 

655 480— R 

656 175— R 

657 480— R 

658 480— R 
ccQ (480 — R 
S59 {l75-R 
662 480— R 
700 175— R 

700 AC 175— R 

701 175— R 
701AC 175— R 

702 175— R 
702AC 175— R 
C90A 175— R 
C90B 175— R 
C399 175— R 
C595 175— R 
C695 175— R 
C495 175— R 
C695 175— R 
C995 175— R 
CI 495 175— R 
T345 175— R 
T397 175— R 
T399 175— R 



COLUMBIA 


32 


175 


34 


175 


C25B 


175 


C 53 


175 


C54 


175 


C55 


175 


C59 


175 


C 80, C 80A 


175 


C80B 


175 


C81 


175 


C83 


175 


C84 


175 


C85 


175 


C 90. C 90A 


175 


C90B 


175 


C93 


175 


C94 


175 


C 120, C 120B 175 


C 123 


175 


C220 


175 


C223 


175 


C256 


175 


C550 


175 


C5,S9 


175 


C800 


175 


CROSLEY* 


4AI 


456 


431 


456 


4C1 


456 


5A1 


181.5 


5A2 


181.5 


5A3 


181.5 


5B2 


456 


5B3 


456 


5C2 


181.5 


5H1 


456 


5M3 


456 


5M4 


456 


.5M5 


456 


5V1 


181.5 


5V2 


181.5 


6B1 


456 


6H2 


456 


6H3 


456 


6V2 


181.5 


7H2 


456 


7H3 


456 


7V2 


181.5 



Model 
Chassis 



I. F 
Peak 



CROSLEY* 
(Continued) 

8B1 181.5 

8B3 456 

8H1 456 

8H3 456 

10P3 181.5 

46 450 

50, 50LB 456 

51 181.5 

Dual 60 456 

61, 61LB 456 

Dual 70 181.5 

72 456 

72, 72LB 456 
80AW, 80AWLB 

456 

95 181 5 

96 181.5 

98 181.5 

99 181.5 

102 181.5 

103 181.5 

119 181.5 

120 175 
121, 121-1 175 

122 175 

123 175 
124, 124-1 175 
125 175 

126, 126-1 175 

127, 127-1 175 
128 175 

129. 129-1 181.5 

130, 130-1 181.5 
131 175 
132-1, 132J 181.5 
133 181.5 
134, 134-1 181.5 
135 181.5 
136-1 456 
137 181.5 
141 181.5 
143 181.5 
146, 146-1 181.5 
148 456 
150 181.5 

154 456 

155 456 

156 456 

157 181.5 

158 181.5 

159 456 

160 181.5 
163 456 

166 456 

167 456 

168 181.5 

169 456 

170 181.5 

171 181.5 

172 456 
173, 173-5 456 

174 456 

175 181.5 

176 456 

178 456 

179 181.5 

180 181.5 

181 456 

182 456 
184 456 

250 450 

251 450 
295 450 
299 450 
349 450 
395 450 
415 450 
425 450 
435, 435AF 450 
435MF 450 
499 450 
495 450 
505, 505MK 450 



Model 
Chassis 



I. F. Model 
Peak Chassis 



CROSLEY* 
(Continued) 

515 450 

516 450 
525, 525B 450 
526 450 
529 450 
534 456 
535, 535AF 450 
535BH, 535MF 450 

536 450 

537 450 

545 450 

546 450 

555 450 

556 450 
605 450 
605BG 450 
605CC 450 
605MG 450 

614 456 

615 450 

616 450 

625 450 

626 450 
629 450 

634 450 

635 450 

636 450 

644 450 

645 450 
645CB 450 
645MB 450 

646 450 
649 450 
655 450 
699 450 

714 456 

715 450 
725 450 

744 450 

745 450 
759 450 
769 450 

814 456 

815 450 
815EC 450 
815NC 450 

816 450 
855 450 
865 450 
899 450 

914 456 

915 450 

916 450 
955 450 
989 450 
1014 456 
1016 450 
1055 450 
1155 450 
1199 450 
1211 450 
1313 450 
1316 450 
1516 450 

5515 450 

5516 450 
5526 450 
5.536 450 
5555 450 
6516 450 
6615 450 
6615FC 450 
6615FF 450 
6625 450 
A156 262.5 
A166 262.5 
A255 262.5 
A266 262.5 
A355 262.5 
A366 262.5 
A455 262.5 
A555 262.5 
B250 450 
B345 450 
B375 450 
B425 450 
B445 450 
B495 4.50 
B499 450 
B599 450 
B675 450 
B695 4,50 
B699 450 
B899 450 
C526 450 
C629 450 
Batt. 5 450 
Batt. 8 450 
Batt. 46 450 
Fiver LB 181.5 

DELCO 

See United Motors 

DETROLA* 

5B 370 



I. F. 
Peak 



5D 

5D1 
5W 
5WG 
5X 



455 
455 
370 
370 
370 



DETROLA* 
(Continued) 

5XG1 370 

5XM1 370 

5XM4 370 

5XM9 370 

5XW2 370 

5XW4 370 

6A 262 

6M 262 

6R 262 

6W 370 

6WG1 370 

6WM1 370 

6WM3 370 

6WM9 370 

6X 370 

6XM1 370 

6XM5 370 

6XM9 370 

6Z1 370 

6Z3 370 

6ZM1 370 

6ZM3 370 

7A 262 
7A3 262 

7X1 262 

7X3 262 
7ZM1 370 

7ZM3 370 

lOZl 456 

10Z3 456 

lOZMl 456 

10ZM3 456 

100, lOOA 456 
lOOC 456 

101, lOlA 456 

102, 102A 456 
102B, 102C 456 
103 480 
105A, 105C 456 
106 456 
108 456 
109A 456 
llOA 456 

111 262 

112 262 
114 456 

116 456 

117 480 
122 385 
125 456 

127 456 

128 456 

129 455 

131 456 

132 456 

133 456 

134 456 

135 456 

136 456 

137 456 

138 456 

139 456 

140 456 
142 456 

144 456 

145 456 

146 456 

147 456 

148 456 

149 456 

151 456 

152 456 

154 456 

155 385 
503 456 
1200 175 
5 Tube Midget 456 
Roadchief 
Roadmaster 175 
Warwick 175 

DE WALD* 

50 175 

51 175 

52 175 
55, 55-R 456 
55-X 456 
56 456 
58, 58-EX 456 
58-L 456 
58-R 455 
59 456 

60, 60-EX 175 
60-R 456 

61, 61-X 456 
61X 456 
62 175 

456 

81, 81-R 456 

90 262 

100 456 

440 456 

500-A 130 

501, 501-A 456 

501-B 456 

503 456 

504 4S& 

To be continued 

in February 
RADIO TODAY 



While every effort has been made to have this listing 100 per cent accurate, 
in a compilation of this magnitude, some errors are possible. The editors will 
appreciate hearing of these mistakes.^Copynght 1937 by Caldwell-Clements, 
Inc. Not to be reprinted without written permission. 

38 



Acknowledgment is given to the following additional sources of information: 
Bernsley's Ofhcial Radio Service Handibook, Gernsback's Official Radio Service 
Manuals, Ghirardi's Radio Field Service Data, Hygrade Sylvania's Auto Radio 
Servicing and Installation, National Union's Official Chart of Peak Frequen- 
cies, Rider's Perpetual Trouble Shooters Manual. 



RECTIFIED RF SIGNAL CURRENT 
HIGH-MU TRIODE PLATE VOLTAGE 

AFC(WTOMftTlCFREQUWCYCONTROl) 

DIODE BALANCING CIRCUITS 



/ 



^H0 vov^^^ 



o^oji^l™ tm^'' 






WITH THE 

Super-Sensitive 

WESTON 

Model 772 

(20,000 OHMS PER VOLT / 

50 Microamperes Full Scale) / 



V^ 




and remember . . . 



you can buy this famous 20,000 ohms per 
volt analyzer, and other WESTON radio 
instruments, through the convenient 
WESTON INVESTMENT PLAN. 



No instrument yet offered the serviceman has met with 
such overwhelming response as Model 772. The reasons 
are obvious. With its sensitivity of 20,000 ohms per volt, 
Model 772 is not only ideal for all usual testing routine 
. . . but it also enables you to get into and thoroughly 
check circuits which cannot be tested with former ser- 
vicing instruments. And being built to high weston 

Weston 

IXadio Insfrumenfs 



standards, servicemen know that Model 772 will serve 
dependably for years. Before you consider the purchase 
of test equipment be sure to get all the facts on Model 
772 and other WESTON instruments for radio servicing. 
Ask your jobber for full particulars or return the coupon 
today ... Weston Electrical Instrument Corporation, 
597 Frelinghuysen Avenue, Newark, New Jersey. 



Weston Electrical Instrumeut Corporation 

597 Frelin^hny^en Avenue. Newark, IV. J. 

Send full data on Model 772 and other WESTON Instn 



January, 1937 



39 



!} 



WHEN YOU 

REPLACE 

RADIO SHAFTS 

VSE ONLY 



ip^ 




FLEXIBLE SHAFTS 
and CASINGS 



Specially designed for radio application 
they are standard original equipment 
on practically all makes of auto radios. 

When properly applied, S.S. WHITE 
Shafts provide a quality of tuning that 
for ease of turning, smoothness and sen- 
sitiveness can scarcely be distinguished 
from a direct connection. 

Be sure to ask your jobber for the genu- 
ine S.S. WHITE Shafts and Casings— 
and accept no others. They assure satis- 
fied customers. 

The S. S. WHITE 

DENTAL MFG. CO. 
\ INDUSTRIAL DIVISION 

10 East 40th Street, Room 2310T 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 




MASTERTONE DE-LUXE 

Portable Recording Unit 



'^'■OfilN& 



A precision-built portable reproduction 
of a professional studio installation — 
Everything complete — Recommended 
where studio quality results and porta- 
bility are required — Write for Bul- 
letin RT-1. 

RECORDING EQUIPMENT 
MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

6611 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, Calif. 




SERVICE NOTES 

{From, page 36) 

up the booth must be shielded on six 
sides, and all power connections com- 
ing into the room must be filtered. 
For this purpose special line filters 
can be purchased. 

The cage is constructed of wooden 
strips bolted together, each side being 
made up of two separate sections for 
ease in handling. The screen can be 
either copper or galvanized iron. In 

SCRIBHIMQ 




WOOD fffAM6S 

TMIS MtTHOD OF CON STftUCJlOf/ 
USeo ON ALL dO/MTS 

WH£^J £ACH SECTION IS BOLTS D 

7Hf scrteeNiNo must m/iks contact 

ON ALL SIDES Of £fiZH seCT/'Oiv 
/^LSO ON TH£ DOOW 



(irder to provide good contact between 
the sections, the screen is overlapped 
1% inches as shown by the sketch on 
this page, and no soldering is re- 
quired. 

Screening of top, sides and door 
is on the inside of the cage. Screen- 
ing on the bottom is on the under- 
neath side. The size of the booth 
should be sufficiently great to allow 
freedom of movements. If needed, 
specific drawings and dimensions can 
be obtained without charge from the 
Tobe Deutschmann Corp., Canton, 
^[ass., manufacturers of power line 
filters and condensers. 

ANTENNA WIRING FOR 
NEW BOILDINGS 

* Specific recommendations for 
radio antenna installations are made 
in a new Interior Wiring Design 
Handbook that is being published for 
the architectural, building and elec- 
trical contracting trades. 

Idea is that every home, apartment 
house and other buildings should have 
several radio outlets for each tenant. 
Recommendations urge the use of an 
outlet with connections for twisted 
pair from antenna and a ground con- 
nection. Twisted pairs from the vari- 
ous outlets are to be terminated in the 
attic in one set of coimections. 

This wiring should be of benefit to 



40 



Radio Today 






f^ 




%-j 



,:\^^£W^^" 




VOLUME CONTROL 



INTERNATIONAL RESISTANCE COMPANY 

401 NORTH BROAD STREET, PHILADELPHIA. PA. 

Factories or Licensees in Canada, England, France, Germany, Italy, Denmark and Australia 

"makers of resistance units of more types, in more shapes, for" 

ra» MORE applications THAN ANY OTHER MANUFACTURER IN THE WORLD 



January. 1937 



41 





Just the 
thing to cure 

R.F. 

WM, • / " 

~^s interierence-, 
mijs JjllL ^LxLl 

"Many's the time I've wished for 
a unit like this to keep interference 
from a near-by transmitter out of 
a customer's receiver." 

Z-20, 5 ampere chokes may be in- 
stalled at the receiver with the usual 
by-pass condensers to serve as a 
filter for high frequency circuits. 
Z-21 and Z-22, 10 and 20 ampere 
chokes are suitable for installation 
at transmitters or other high fre- 
quency apparatus to prevent R. F. 
currents from going out over the 
power line. Ask your jobber or 
write for Bulletin 105. 

another useful unit 




OHMITE DIVIDOHM 

A semi-variable resistor, handy for 
replacing bleeders, voltage divid- 
ers or resistors of odd values. 
Patented percentage-of-resistance 
scale makes it easy to find approxi- 
mate value wanted. Ask your 
jobber or write for Catalog 15 list- 
ing over 200 values in six sizes. 

© IMI M D T i 

MANUFACTURING CO. 
4847 Flournoy St., Chicago, III. 
-Manufacturers of- 



Resistors, Rheostats and Tapswitches 



SERVICE NOTES 



the owner and serviceman alike. 
Owner has benefit of concealed wiring 
— serviceman still has revenue from 
outside all-wave antenna installation, 
which is connected to terminal strip 
in the attic. Radio set can be moved 
around house — antenna and ground 
connections can be quickly made by 
utilizing outlets in the various rooms. 
The RMA is urging set manufac- 
turers to become acquainted with the 
specifications so that their sets can 
be designed to operate satisfactorily 
with the recommended facilities. 

A-K COLOfi CODINGS 

* Color coding employed in the 
Atwater-Kent receivers previous to 
1935 was their own system — and not 
the standard E.M.A. After 1934 
most of the resistors employed in the 
A-K sets used E.M.A. coloring — but 
even in these later receivers a few 
resistors using their own private cod- 
ing will be found. R.M.A. color 
coded mica condensers are used in 
the 1935 and 1936 receivers. 

Fortunately most of the A-K color 
codings used only one or two colors 
and little diificulty will be had in 
distinguishing them from the E.M.A. 
coding. Below is Atwater-Kent's 
own color code for composition re- 
sistors. 



150- 

300- 

425- 

3,300- 

4,000- 

5,000- 

6,000- 

7,500- 

10,000- 

12,500- 



20,000- 
30,000- 

40,000- 

50,000- 

65,000- 

100,000- 

250,000- 
500,000- 
800,000- 

1 MEG- 

2 MEG- 



- Brown & green 

- Maroon & blue 

- Blue, yellow, green 

- Green & red 

- Green & blue 

- Blue & yellow 

- Purple 

- Yellow 

- Maroon 
[Purple & yellow 

-■^Purple & red 

IRed 

(Gray & yellow 
" (Gray & green 

- Black & red 

- Gray 
(White 

" (Black & yellow 

■ Black, yellow & red 
(Black 

(Black & green 

(Blue 

(Red & blue 

- Red & yellow 

■ Black & purple 

- Red & gray 

- Blue & gray 

- Green 



ELIMINATING BC IMAGES 

* In certain locations image in- 
terference on the broadcast band may 
be experienced with the 2-gang super- 
het receivers. Trouble is that there 
isn't suificient selectivity ahead of the 
I.F. amplifier. 

Usually the difliculty is most pro- 
nounced at the high frequency end 
of the band. Interference is produced 
{To page 47) 




THE common sense aerial foK steel top automobiles. 
Puts the aerial OVER THE TOP witere it belongs. 
Outstanding performance, plus keen streamlined appear- 
ance — highly polished aerial — semi-round — die formed 
like decorative body trim — MOUNTED ON TOP OF rub- 
ber vacuum posts — carries center trim line of hood, 
windshield, and rear window riqht over top of car. Ex- 
tremely efficient — not damaged by weather — works in rain, 
ice and snow anywhere, anytime. Steel ^ ^ ^ _ 
car top shields against interference from «P ^M D 9 
ignition and lighting. Easy to install w LIST 
— shipped straight, no kinks — no holes eni D BY 
to drill in top — easy on car finish. Smart , EAriiu/- 
appearance — greater volume — more distance LEADINo 
— and reduced noise. JOBBERS 

WEDGE MANUFACTURING CO. 
2338 S. Michigan Avenue, Chicago 



m>mm^ RADIOS 



p! 1937 Knight Radios oifer you 

' '• unbeatable profit-making oppor- 

' tunities! Sensational new featur»> 

- include giant 11-in. Magna-Span 

Dials and super-dynamic Vita-Tone 

Speakers. Unmatched performance, 

at amazingly low prices. 3S models, 

I 5-19 tubes, as low as $8,451 



M 000 Service Parts 



You can fill every service need 
from the ALLIED Catalog — at 
lowest prices. Lists over 10,000 
exact duplicate and replacement 
parts, complete test equipment, 
tools, books, etc. You save time, 
trouble and money on every pur- 
chase by ordering from ALLIED. 




Send For CAT/ILOG 



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log also sfiows newest 
sound systems, amateur 
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and Windchariers, etc. 
Whatever you need, you'll 
always And It in the 
ALLIED Catalog at 
the lowest prices. 



ALLIED RADIO 



ALLIED RADIO CORPORATION Dept. 15-A 

IS33 W. Jackson Blvd., Chicago, III. | 

Send us your new 1937 Catalog (Free). ' 

I Name I 

■ Address ■ 

' City 



42 



Radio Today 




SETS A FASTER PACE FOtl 1937 

• It's full speed ahead as Frigidaire — already traveling 
faster than ever — greets the new year and the oppor- 
tunities ahead with added power! 

With a new selling strategy ! With an enlarged sched- 
ule of packed- with-punch advertising — more dramatic 
and sales-compelling than ever! With a new product 
that incorporates many startling new features — includ- 
ing one that adds so much to the services of refrigeration 
that it will instantly capture the imagination of the buy- 
ing public and start dealers talking from coast to coast! 



Frigidaire Dealers in 1937 will have the most power- 
ful program they have ever had. And be prepared for 
another record-breaking year! 

Soon everyone will know the news. And Frigidaire men 
will be on their way to even greater success and profits! 

FRIGIDAIRE DIVISION 
General Motors Sales Corporation, Dayton, Ohio 




You'iLPo SniL BETTER wtrn Fiu&iDAinE /n^/ 



January, 1937 



43 



DEALERS WILL SELECT APPLIANCES 

New electrical lines register OK appeal on non-appliance stores 



* SILVEE AND' WHITE glisten 
of electric household appliances still 
is missing in a number of radio shops. 

In a preliminary report on its most 
recent Census of Business, the United 
States Dept. of Commerce indicates 
that at least 4,309 radio stores in the 
country are not selling the merchan- 
dise. 

To the radio dealer and to the 
radio-appliance merchant, this report 
will reveal the nature and extent of 
competition; to the appliance manu- 
facturer it means that a flock of radio 
outlets have not been seduced by the 
extra profit involved in selling his 
products. 

In the state of California, for in- 
stance, there are 457 known radio 
dealers of the non-appliance group, 
and the state of New York has a 
grand total of 604. 

Curious distribution 

Figures on these dealers, by states, 
refuse to follow any usual pattern of 
population, retail activity or sales 
importance. The states of California 
and Ohio are generally accepted as 
doing about the same volume of busi- 
ness in the industries concerned, and 
yet Ohio has 28-3 non-appliance radio 
stores as compared with California's 
457. 



On the other hand, the state of 
Iowa ranks about 14th on the 1935 
Census preliminary report in general 
retail sales volume, while it is sixth 
from the top in the number of non- 
appliance radio stores. And Massa- 
chusetts has 155 of these stores, while 
ranking sixth in general retail im- 
portance. 

It is to be remembered that these 
4,309 radio outlets are exclusively 
those which do not come under the 
head of stores classed as musical, fur- 
niture, department, automotive, hard- 
ware, sporting goods, jewelry, etc., 
many of which are selling radio to 
the extent that the total number of 
radio outlets in the country is esti- 
mated at 50,300. 

Considerable trade interest centers 
around the question of how many of 
the non-appliance radio men will be 
attracted by the new lines presented 
by the appliance manufacturers. The 
1937 products are streamlined, lower 
in price, multi-featured, touted to the 
skies, vigorously encouraged by util- 
ities and designed to attract fresh 
groups of prospects. 



■* New distributor-dealer set-up 
for merchandising Copeland refriger- 
ators has been announced by Dallas 
E. Winslow, president, Copeland Re- 
frigeration Corp., Detroit. Sales for 



tlie firm have formerly been handled 
by Truscon Steel Co. and many of the 
past outlets will be retained, but 
Copeland plans new accounts and 
has added a new factory staff to de- 
velop them. Directing the new sales 
organization are James D. McLeod, 
general sales manager, and "W. G. 
von Meyer, vice-pres. and sales man- 
ager. Ad experts at Baldwin & 
Strachan, Inc., Buffalo, will direct 
Copeland's vigorous new promotional 
drive. 



* Completely re-designed refrig- 
erator line of Spai'ton will be shown 
at Sparks-Wlthington's annual dis- 
tributor convention at the Hayes 
Hotel, Jackson, Mich., Jan. 22 and 
2 3. Jobbers from all parts of U. S. 
and Canada will be guests. 



* Howard E. Blood, outstanding 
national business exec who has been 
president of the Norge Division of 
the Borg-Warner Coip. since 1929, 
has been named executive president 
in charge of operations of all the 
various divisions of company. Firm 
has 16 plants in five states, and be- 
sides its Norge activities, is active in 
the automotive, marine, aviation and 
agricultural fields. 



* Capital City Distributing Corp., 

Albany, N. Y., jobbers for RCA, re- 
cently concluded a 3-day showing of 
Leonard refrigerators at Springfield, 
Mass. Max E. Hegleman, Capital 
City's sales manager, reports vigor- 
ous dealer-ordering. 



CURRENT APPLIANCE SALES PROPOSITION CLICKS ALIKE WITH BOSS AND SALESMEN 




TALE OF PROFIT about renewed work on electrical 
appliances comes from manufacturer's representative. 



SAME STORY told to the dealer's sales force stirs up 
genuine enthusiasm for a snappy drive on new lines. 



44 



Radio Today 



* Thirty-six convention presenta- 
tions in 3 3 of the major cities of the 
nation are currently giving the 
2 0,000 members of the Fiigldalre 
selling organization the new line of 
1937 household appliances along with 
additional sales and merchandising 
plans. Ellsworth Gilbert is conven- 
tion director and has arranged for 
three flying squadrons of a dozen 
men each to cover the 33 cities dur- 
ing February. 

More than 600 members of Frig- 
idaire's national sales executive staff 
met in Dayton. Ohio, Jan. 12 for 
a series o'' asse"ibl'>=; preli^iinary 
to the world-wide presentation of 
1937 products. Prominent at the 
opening sessions were Carl A. Copp, 
general sales manager; V. A. Hetzel, 
installation and service manager, and 
E. G. Biechler, general manager. 



■* Annual distributors' meeting 
of General Household Utilities Co., 

at the Hotel Stevens in Chicago, Jan. 
5 and 6, gave some 300 jobbers the 
low-down on Gnmow radio and re- 
frigeration plans for 1937. New 1937 
line of refrigerators was presented 
and included several surprise values; 
advertising, merchandising and sales 
plans were also explained. Grunow 
distributors also viewed several new 
attractive radio models. 

Grunow officials important at 
the affair were Wm. C. Grunow, 
president; Walter L. Eckhardt, di- 
rector of sales; Tod Reed, asst. sales 
manager; Dr. J. D. Jordan, develop- 
ment engineer; and M. W. Kenny, 
director of engineering. 

■*• New distributors for Crosley on 
Pacific Coast are the Associated 
Wholesale Electric Co., 1111 Santee 
St., Los Angeles, and the San Diego 
Auto Electric Co., 916 Union St., San 
Diego. Crosley district man in 
charge of the area is Paul W. Bial- 
kowsky. 



* Indianapolis convention for 
Fairbanks, Morse & Co. distributors 
in December was a lively debut for 
the 19 3 7 refrigerators. Annual affair 
was attended by 200 guests who or- 
dered 103 per cent more boxes than 
at the previous convention. W. Paul 
.Jones, general manager of the FM 
home appliance division, presented a 
list of new features; Parker H. 
Ericksen, radio sales manager, ex- 
plained dealer-getting plans; John S. 
Garceau, new advertising manager, 
outlined national advertising; and 
Paul Eckstein, assistant ad manager, 
presented new promotional litera- 
ture. 

■*• Time Appliance Co., New York 
City, were hosts Jan. 8 to 1500 deal- 
ers of the area at a Westinghouse 
refrigerator and range show at the 
Commodore Hotel. Complete 1937 
line was paraded for the guests and 
officials explained the new advertis- 
ing and promotion plans. Feature 
came when guests were given sledge 
hammers and invited to see whether 
the refrigerator cabinets would stand 
up under repeated blows. Hosts re- 
port that not a seam was broken. 

* Xorge Division of the Borg- 
Wamer Corp. reports that refrigera- 
tor sales for the year just closed 
were 41.3 per cent above totals for 
the previous year. General pick-up 
for all products of the firm was 5 6.5 
per cent over last year and all pre- 
vious records have been topped. 

* Kelley-How-Thonison Co., Du- 

luth, Minn., is now an exclusive dis- 
tributor for Stewart-Warner prod- 
ucts. Acquisition of the line was 
followed by a sales conference with 
SW officials, at which the distribu- 
tor's big sales organization heard 
about the new lines. Kelley-How- 
Thompson immediately scheduled a 
series of dealer meetings for Jan. 
11 to 2 at Duluth, St. Paul, Minn., 
Fargo. Bismarck and Minot. N. Dak., 
Great Falls and Billings, Mont. 




UPPED to position of ad manager 
for Stewart- Warner's radio and re- 
frigeration division, C. C. DeWees. 



• At the studios of WLW, Cros- 
ley Radio Corp., Cincinnati, early 
this month approximately 150 dis- 
tributors and their representatives 
assembled to view the new 1937 line 
of Crosley Shelvador refrigerators. 
Guests came from all parts of the 
U. S. to hear sales, merchandising 
and advertising plans outlined by 
Thomas W. Berger, Glenn H. Corbett 
and G. Earle Walker, respectively 
general sales manager, and manager 
and merchandising manager. 

Feature announcements included 
a refrigerator equipped with a radio, 
and the first phonograph-radio com- 
bination to be marketed domestically 
by Crosley. 



NAMES, ADDRESSES AND MOODS OF ALL HOUSEHOLDERS DESERVE AN INSTANT CHECK 




FILED DYNAMITE in the form of other-dept. purchasers 
is dragged out for careful, seasonal sales effort. 



"NO" WOMEN are apt to weaken when there's a new 
model, an appointment, a neat approach and a planned appeal. 



January, 1937 



45 




Frankly, aren't refrigerator 
prospects a little jaded from 
the repetition of refrigerators with small differences? 

Before deciding on your 1937 refrigerator sales activities, 
make your plans on the basis of whether or not you are 
going to sell refrigerators which, as far as prospects are 
concerned, look but little different from the one they will see 
down the street, across the street, and in thousands of stores 
everywhere. 

Fairbanks-Morse dealers will have something different to 
make their plans more productive — a refrigerator line with a 
big, sales-compelling difference. A refrigerator that has 
every feature offered by all other refrigerators, plus a big, 
easily seen, easily understood feature — the NEW CON- 
SERVADOR. 

THINK OF THESE: 

A refrigerator which out -economizes the most economical; 
which secures economy without sacrificing any ability to 
protect food during a heat wave. A refrigerator from which 
two-fifths of the food can be removed without opening the 



main food compartment. A refrigerator with a twin-sealed 
door — the first modern door in the industry — simplified 
temperature control — automatic overload protector that re- 
sets itself — and a host of other features. A refrigerator whose 
low cost of operation you can prove, not in kilowatts, not by 
comparison, but in pennies — and do it right on your sales- 
room floor! 

And think of the new Conservador! Only Fairbanks-Morse 
can give it to you to sell. Only behind the Fairbanks-Morse 
nameplate will you find the Conservador and such a host of 
worth-while features. 

Only behind the Fairbanks-Morse nameplate can you 
find a refrigerator that gives you the final, big difference 
that puts over a sale when small differences fail. 

Write, phone, or wire for name of your Fairbanks-Morse 
distributor. In justice to 1937 profits, do not close your line 
without first seeing Fairbanks-Morse Conservador Re- 
frigerator. Fairbanks, Morse & Co., Home Appliance Di- 
vision, 2060 Northwestern Avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana. 
Other Fairbanks-Morse Products: Washing Machines, 
Ironers, Radios, Automatic Coal Burners. 



FAIRBANKS AMORSE 





46 



Radio Today 







Of all the thou- 
sands of Sprague in- 
verted Aluminum Can 
Type Dry Electrolytics (Type 
SC's) sold last year, I'm con- 
vinced that MORE THAN HALF 
were used in Power Amplifier equipment 
where exceptionally good filtering and the 
ability to stand sudden surges are abso- 
lutely essential. Servicemen themselves will 
tell you they build up to 650 to 670 volts — 
and with extremely low leakages. We have 
done our best to give you the finest replace- 
ment condensers. We challenge competitors 
to equal their quality and electrical charac- 
teristics. Let me send the new Sprague 
Catalog today to help you on your next 
condenser order. 

SPRAGUE PRODUCTS CO. 
North Adams, Mass. 




SERVICE NOTES 

(From page 42) 

by stations higher in frequency than 
the desired one by twice the I.F. peak. 
Very often local police transmitters 
will cause whistles and other noises — 
they can be easily identified because 
of their intermittent nature. 

This kind of interference can often 
be remedied by altering the I.F. fre- 
quency of the set slightly so as to 
change the location of the image. 
For instance, if the desired signal is 
1550 KC (WQXR in N.T.C.) and 
image interference appears at 2450 
KC (I.F. = 450 KC), by increasing 
the I.F. to 475 KC the new image 
appears at 1550 + 950 or 2500 KG. 
If this new frequency is clear there 
will no longer be interference when 
the set is tuned to 1550 KC. 

Idea behind this change of I.F. fre- 
quency is to adjust the I.F. peak to 
such a value that when desired sta- 
tions are tuned in, the image frequen- 
cies are not the same as those of 
powerful nearby transmitters. 

When making such changes in the 
receiver intermediate frequency it 
will be necessary to readjust the oscil- 
lator series (low freq.) padding con- 
densers and check the set tracking. 



'^^<i''l^' 













Fellows, you'll find 
these small Cardboard 
dry Electrolyti 
ETCHED FOIL Condensers 
(Sprague Type PTM) are built 
to take everything the rectifier will 
give them. They mean more pep for the 
set plus better tonal quality. Both you and^ 
your customers will quickly note the im- 
provement. Conservatively rated at 525 volts, 
yet servicemen themselves say they'll take 
surges as high as 560 and even 580 volts! 
Won't break down because you can't reach 
^he sparking point. FAMOUS SPRAGUE 
HUMIDITY-PROOF SEALING and other 
features at no additional cost. 

Truthfully and sincerely, 



SPRAGUE PRODUCTS 
North Adams, Mass. 



CO. 



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TECHNIC Tube Testers, 
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Overall size of case, 5 " x 12 " x sensitive of all short cir- 
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through multiple readings, 

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January, 1937 



47 



IF 



IF 



you are a 

SERVICEMAN 



you are a 

DEALER 



Tou need radios latest and largest 
compilation of 

I. F. PEAKS 

and 

COLOR CODING DATA 

APPEARING IN THIS ISSUE, PAGE 38, 
CONTINUED IN SUCCEEDING ISSUES 



Tou need these vital facts, figures 
and methods: 

"HOW TO MAKE 
MORE PROFITS 
OUT OF RADIO" 

BEGINNING IN JANUARY AND. 
CONTINUED IN SUCCEEDING ISSUES 



AGAIN, Radio Today adds to its record of "firsts" — 
• first in rendering much-needed services to the reader. 
"I.F. Peaks & Color Coding Data" is not only first; it is 
the most complete and accurate compilation ever made in 
this field. It is so complete — so extensive — that it neces- 
sarily appears in serial form and extends over a period of 
many months. 

You will need this compilation; this new material in con- 
venient form. It will give you data on 8,000 sets, from 
the first superhet up to and including the current models; 
will give you the data on both private and standard brands. 

Each instalment in the series will be uptodate — up to the 
month when the instalment appears. 

The intermediate frequency material is more accurate than 
the manufacturers' own records! Yes, actually more accu- 
rate. For this reason: In double-checking and cross-check- 
ing the data from all available sources, many early errors 
and omissions were found and corrected. 

The color coding data, in conjunction with the I.F. data, 
will be extremely useful to servicemen. It is obtainable at 
no other source because no other compilation of this nature 
has ever been made. Both classes of material will make 
the service man's work quicker and more accurate. 

Unless you are a subscriber or unless you send in your sub- 
scription at once — you will miss out on this valuable com- 
pilation. Each edition of Radio Today is limited to the 
usual print order; hence single copies will not be available. 
Subscribe NOW! 



FOR every man who sells radio at retail. Radio Today 
begins a series of feature articles that will be money- 
makers — a series of the utmost importance, covering all of 
the profit-phases of retail selling and retail sales promotion. 

For example: 

How to reach more customers. 
How to "sell up" better sets. 
How to find prospects with cash. 
How to cut selling costs. 
How to pick go-getter salesmen. 
How to handle instalment sales. 
How to attract people to your store. 
How to select your radio stock. 
How to write radio ads that pull. 
How to control expenses against loss. 
How to insure profits. 

— and, as a part of the series, a new statistical study of 
selling costs entitled 

"YARDSTICKS for PROFIT MAKING" 

This eye-opening feature will be compiled with the coop- 
eration of Dr. Norris A. Brisco, Dean of the New York 
University School of Retailing. 

With an entirely new and uptodate series of studies, this 
feature will carry forward the systematic study of retail 
selling costs conducted since 1926 by the present staff of 
Radio Today. 

Make sure of getting this feature — all of it. Back orders 
cannot be filled. Enter your subscription today. 



SUBSCRIBE NOW! 

Enter your subscription at the present low rate of $1 for 1 year, or $2 for 3 years. Use the post card here- 
with. Mail it today. It will bring you information that is worth many times the cost of your subscription. 



48 



Radio Today 




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SERVICE NOTES 

MANUFACTURERS' SERVICE DATA 

* During visits with servicemen 
the subject of service bulletins in- 
variably comes up — it seems that only 
a few manufacturers supply the data 
that the industry wants and uses. 

Just what is needed in the way of 
service information varies from man 
to man — some want D'C resistances of 
RF coils in spite of the fact that they 
have no devices to accurately measure 
these values. Others request data 
ranging from the impedance of voice 
coils to microvolt inputs for standard 
outputs. Another group must have 
current data for all tubes since they 
depend upon that type of anlysis. 

In order to please everyone, the 
manufacturers would have to publish 
30 to 50 page bulletins for each model. 
Economically that is impossible. 

Because of the wide differences in 
opinion Radio Today is putting the 
subject up to servicemen everywhere. 
In this way it will perhaps be possible 
to find out what information is con- 
sidered most valuable — and the data 
will be passed on to the set manufac- 
turers. 

Below is a short questionnaire list- 
ing a few items. If the data is essen- 
tial place a number i next to these 
questions. If the data is desirable 
use number 2, and if seldom needed 
use number j. Please paste the ques- 
tion on the back of a postcard and 
mail to us — and please use the extra 
space for any desired comments re- 
garding service material. 



SERVICE DATA QUESTIONNAIRE 

See above article before answering. 
Would you like all mfrs. to use a 
standardized type of schematic dia- 
gram? Yes. . . . No 

Values of parts, voltages, currents 
on (1) schematic and chassis layout 
(2) in table form — (cross out one). 

D 

D 
D 



Microvolt inputs for sensitivity 
tests of sets on all bands. 

Cathode ray alignment data. 

Supplementary diagrams show- 
ing wiring details of coils, trans- 
formers, etc. 

Technical description of unusual 
circuit features. 



Detailed chassis layout showing 
location of parts, tubes, wires, 



D 
D 

etc. 

Please mail to RADIO TODAY, 
480 Lexington Ave., New York, N. Y. 

Name 

Street .' 

City, State 



GIVE ALL TUBES A COMPLETE TEST 







MODEL 
1502 

• Rndio Tubes have three different functions: to amplify, to deliver power, to 
rectify. 

• For Amplifiers (75% or more of all tubes) the Power Output Test is absolutely 
the final Tvord In determining the worth of the tube. The Poiver Output Test in 
Triplett P.O.E^. Tester simulates actual operating conditions In the rndio receiving: 
set. 

• For Power Tubes, the Power Output Test determines the amplification factor. 
The Emission Test determines the povrer handling; ability. Both tests are necessary 
to properly analyze these tubes, available only in the P.O.F. Tester. 

• The function of the Diode tube is to rectify. Here the Fmission Test only Is 
made to determine the condition of the tube. P.O.E. tests these under both voltagre 
and current load. The proper high voltages used in the P. O.K. Tester will detect 
any flash overs. 

Model 1502 has shadow graph line voltage indicator. Neon inter-element short test made while 

tube is hot. Complete in quartered oak case DEALER PRICE — $36.67 

Model 1503 same as above but also combines separate Universal Volt-Ohm-Milliammeter, Con- 
denser Tester and Decibel Meter DEALER PRICE— $46.67 

Model 1504 same as 1503 but also combines Free Point Tester DEALER PRICE— $56.67 



ELECTRICAL INSTRUMENTS 



TRIPLETT ELECTRICAL INSTRUMENT CO. 
191 Harmon Ave., Bluffton, Ohio 

_ Please send me more information on d Model 1502; 
; I Model 1503; d Model 1504. I am also interested in 



Name . 

A'iliress 



110 VOLTS AC ANYWHERE 

KATOLIGHT. JR.. AC PLANTS 

Sells itself! 55 pounds. Self-cranking 300 watts, 
and rope-cranking 350 watts. Also 6, 12, 32 and 
110 volts DC. 

300 TO 10.000 WATT AC PLANTS 

Specially designed for sound - truck, amplifier, 
P.A., radio and other work. Self-contained. Self- 
cranking by connecting to auto batteries. 

DIESEL PLANTS 

Full Diesel AC & DC plants. 2, 3, 5, 6 KW sizes. 

* * * 
AC. DC Generators, Rotary Converters; DC 
Plants; Windmill Lighting Plants. 

Dealers, Jobbers, write for details and discounts 

KATO ENGINEERING COMPANY 

MANKATO, MINNESOTA, U.S.A. 




January, 1937 



49 



TO HELP you 

SELL MORE 

SOUND EQUIPMENT 




Prubably you have felt like lots »f other Sound Dealers 
that you could do a bigrger job in Sound Elquipnient if 
you eould get a little bit of help and cooperation from 
the manufacturer. AAebster-Chicago now offers you a 
well balanced iirograin th:it atIII ilefinitely ^vork for 
you to get more business. 

Sho« n :ibove are: 

1. Sound Engineering Book. i6 pages 

packed with Engineering and 
Sales Data. Copy available to you 
free of charge. 

2. School Bulletin— A sales mailing 
piece for school principals, super- 
intendents and architects — also 
series of letters. 



3. Inter-Otfice Communicating Sys- 
tem Folder. Gotten up definitely 
to open doors . . . well worth 
a trial in any locality. 



4. Factory Call System. Mailing 

Piece. There is a big market for 
Call Systems. This mailing piece 
is unusual and will get attention. 

5. Personal Dealer Signs. Here are 

signs with your name. Inquiry 
getters and business pullers for 
you, to put in your window, to 
place with all jobs you rent, to 
put in prominent places like ho- 
tel lobbies, or other spots avail- 
able to aggressive dealers. Get 
more information. 



Other helps are in process. In addition, Webster- 
Chicago maintains a steady advertising campaign to 
actual consumers resulting in hundreds of direct in- 
quiries each month. Inquiries are forwarded to near- 
est \Vebster-Chicago dealer. 

Remember also that with W'ebster-Chicago vou will be 
handling a COMPLETE LI^E of Sound Equipment and 
rccssories of All Ivinds. 






WEBSTER-CHICAGO 

Fu//y Licensed 

Strict Deafer Policy 

Time Payment P/an 




ANOTHER MAJOR 

VIBRATOR IMPROVEMENT 

BY THE leader- 
No More Broken Leads 



Utah has always been the 
leader in the design and man- 
ufacture of vibrators for radio 
purposes. This organization 
has pioneered in vibrator 
design, and is the recognized 
and leading source of the 
radio industry for this port. 

^Every Utah Vibrator em- 

, bodies the same high 

k qualities of workmanship 

^and design found in 

other Utah products. 

k Speakers • Transformers 

^ Chokes • Volume Controls 

Tone Controls • Resistors 

^Plugs • Jocks • Push 

Button Switches 




Utah Vibrators are pro- 
tected by one or more of 
the following patents: 
1S240B2. 1935568. 
1935569, 1944487, 
1946563, 1951614, 
1961053, 2009425. 
Other patents pending 



VIBRATORS 



UTAH RADIO PRODUCTS CO. 



CHICAGO, U. S. A. 



TORONTO 
ONTARIO CANADA 



BUENOS AIRES 
(UCOA RADIO PRODUCTS CO.) 



"15 \\m OF lEHDEIiSHIP" 



50 



Radio Today 



SERVICE NOTES 

CLEVELAND BANS "FIFTY 
CENT" SERVICE 

* Servicemen in Cleveland, Ohio, 
have been conducting a drive against 
the former evil of advertisements for 
"oO-cent service calls." 

As a result, reports Max J. Bauer, 
head of the radio and sound division 
of a local organization of servicemen, 
persistent "50-cent" advertisers in 
the local newspapers have stopped this 
practice, and signs quoting 50-cent 
and 75-cent service calls, have been 
replaced by $1.50 minimums. This 
$1.50 price, Mr. Bauer feels, is a fair 
charge to the public and covers the 
serviceman's gasoline, depreciation, 
etc. 



SERVICE TIPS' 



Zenith Model 750 



Dead 



* If the grids of the I.F. tube be- 
come red hot look for a shorted I.F. 
transformer. This is caused very often 
by the leads of one winding touching 
those of the other winding. 



Sparton Model 120 



Oscillates 
When Warm 

* If the receiver functions cor- 
rectly until it becomes hot increase 
the value of the by-pass condenser 
across the cathode resistor. Sometimes 
it is necessary to employ a condenser 
as large as 1 microfarad to obtain 
stability. 



•Service tips are selected from the 
files of H. K. Bradford, President, Cap- 
itol Radio Research Labs., T\''ashington, 
D. C. 



Auto Radio Distributor Interference 

■*: In some cases wear of the dis- 
tributor shaft carrying the rotor will 
be responsible for considerable trouble 
in the way of interference. When this 
has been definitely established, the 
remedy, of course, is to replace the 
shaft. Undue wear of this shaft allows 
variation in the spark gap setting, 
thus causing trouble. 

Brunswick Model S-14 K'ushy, 

Whistle, Hum 

* Any of these troubles, either 
while the set is warming up or con- 
tinuously, indicates unbalanced, gassy 
or otherwise defective power tubes. 

RCA Victor R-1 1 Inoperative 

* If the .1 mfd. a-v-c filter conden- 
ser has a leakage resistance this will 
in effect over-bias the tubes which are 
a-v-c controlled making the set inoper- 
ative. If operation of the circuit is re- 
stored by removing the a-v-c tube, re- 
place the .1 mfd. unit. A common 
trouble in this model may also be 
traced to an open in one of the wind- 
ings of the second i-f transformer. 

Majestic Model 20 Sizzling and 

Frying 

* The tone control is usually re- 
sponsible for this trouble. Open the 
chassis at the rear left side where the 
tone control is located and simply clip 
the condenser. If the customer wants 
to have a tone control, replace the 
condenser with a .03 mfd. 600 volt 
tubular type. 

Phiico Model 10 Noisy When Set 

Is Jarred 

* Check the coil shields for solid 
contact with the chassis. Also check 
the coil bracket supports for the same 
condition. As this trouble may correct 
itself if you invert the chassis, be sure 
to keep it right side up when doing 
this work. 

Crosley Model 120 Inoperative 

* When the receiver is found to 
be dead over the lower end of the dial, 
it is quite possible that the dynatron 



oscillator used in this receiver is not 
functioning. This may usually be 
traced to an over-oxidized flathead 
screw and stationary plate of the pad- 
ding system used for the low frequency 
end of the tuning range. Such units 
must be carefully cleaned and replaced 
as before. Use sand-paper and alcohol 
in cleaning these units, and apply a 
thin coating of vaseline to each part 
when replacing to prevent further oxi- 
(lat'ou. 



FOR MEN WHO WANTi£, 
TO GET AHEAD ^M 

Kadio Service work is becoming more and 
more complicated. Technical training is a 
necessity if you expect to advance. Smart 
men are insuring their futures by training 
NOW. GOOD men always have GOOD 
jobs. Study at home and be ready to go 
ahead as a trained Service Technician. 

COMPLETE HOME STUDY TRAINING 
FOR PROFESSIONAL SERVICEMEN 

A complete, up-to-date course in Advanced 
Kadio Service and Public Address Work. 

with or Without Television. Terms as low 

as $5 monthly. Write for details now. 



RIfiHT NOW- WRITE NOW! 



A request on a penny post 
card will bring you your own 
copy of this interesting, illus- 
trated booklet. Explains courses, 
school, faculty, terms and your 
in the Service field. 

RADIO SERVICE INSTITUTE 

SUBSIDIARY OF CREI 

Dept. RT-1, 3308 14tli St., N. W., Washington, D. 0. 





N E W - a low cost C-B Oscillograph 

MODEL 105 



You Need Every One 
of These Exclusive Features 

Uses the new Type 91 3 one-inch Cathode- 
ray tube and provides every feature of the 
most expensive oscillosraphs, such as: 
Linear Sweep with synchronizing circuit 
using the Type 885 Thyratron; separate 
High Cain Amplifiers for horizontal and 
vertical plates,- Beam Centering Controls; 
and adjustable light shield for Cathode- 
ray tube screen. 

Compact, easily portable — yet the most 
complete instrument ever offered using the 
Type 91 3 tube. Not one of these features 
can be omitted without so limiting the 
utility of the oscillograph that any saving is 
wasted by limited performance. Write for 
bulletin describing this instrument in detail. 



with Linear Sweep, Dual Amplifiers, etc. ^ 

Complete with five lubes, net cash «^ M O g Q 
Pay-As-You-Earn. $5.50 down "tO 

Oscillators for Use with MODEL 105 



See Your Jobber Today — Or Use This Coupon 



This instrument now makes it possible for you to secure 
complete Cathode-ray Receiver Servicing equipment 
for only $9.50 down (MODELS 81 -A and 105). 
Designed for use with either the MODEL OM-A 
Frequency Modulated Oscillator or the MODEL 
81 -A Frequency Modulator, to produce calibrated se- 
lectivity curve images by single or double trace method. 



The CLOUGH-BRENGLE CO. 



2827 W. 19th St., Chicago, U.S.A. 

Send at once full description of the new MODEL 
105 Cathode-ray oscillograph and time payment 
order blank. 

Name _ 

Address _ 



January, 1937 



51 




DOPE ON DISTRIBUTORS 



THE NEW STANDARD 
IN AMPLIFIERS 

INTRODUCING a new type of amplifier — ultra modern 
in design and having the professional appearance 
50 necessary for fine installations. 

ELAMCO Series "B" amplifiers (illustrated) are 
built to the most exactinu standards and developed 
around an original and unique type of construction, 
skillfully incorporated into moderately priced units. 

Electrically, these amplifiers rank among the finest. 
Mechanically, they are vastly different, creating dis- 
tinctive installations. 

Descriptive bulletins are available, giving detailed in- 
formation on these remarkable amplifiers. Series "C," 
chassis type amplifiers, will also prove mighty inter- 
esting to you. Send for your bulletins now. 



STRICT DEALER POLICY 




* Motorola's car radio line for 
1937 was presented to a coast-to- 
coast gathering of distributors Jan. 
14 in Chicago. Paul V. Galvin, pres- 
ident, Galvin Mfg. Co., directed the 
presentation, assisted by Joseph Gal- 
vin, vice-president of the firm, and 
Elmer Wavering, sales manager of 
Motorola auto set division. Extensive 
sales promotion plans were revealed, 
accenting cooperation with jobbers 
and dealers. 

■* New service manager at the 
Fuller Specialty Co., Parkersburg, W. 
Va., is Keith Monroe. Fuller's man- 
ufacture and sell all types of sound 
equipment and maintain a laboratory 
in which to do wholesale service 
work for 10 dealers in Parkersburg 
and 30 in the area. 

* Bloch Bros., jobbers of Selma, 
Ala., have recently released to ser- 
vicemen a new 1937 catalog, one of 
the most complete in the history of 
the house. 

* The Shield Co., Inc., Crosley 

distributor, Ft. Worth, Tex., has 
moved to a new home at 1010 Macon 
St. New outlay includes 18,000 sq. 
ft. of floor space, enlarged service 
and accessory departments, a big 
parking lot and a sound room spe- 
cially built for demonstrating electric 
organs. 



CANDOHMS 

ZIPOHMS 

SWITCHES 

SPIRASHIELDS 

BRIDGES 

DECADE BOXES 



MUTER fU5H 



JACK SCANLAN FLOYD CHURCHILL 

PETE DAILEY LES MUTER FRED STEVENS 



DEPENDABLE 
QUALITY 

AND 
RELIABLE 
SERVICE 
ALWAYS 



TWS - 11 - CHICAGO ILL 217 PM 

JOBBERS - DEALERS - SERVICEMEN 
NEW PUSH BUTTON SWITCHES WITH SPECIAL 
FEATURES IMMEDIATE DELIVERY STOP COM- 
PLETE CATALOG FREE STOP INSURE YOUR 
PROFITS SELL MUTER PARTS STOP ASK ABOUT 
ZIPOHMS AND SWITCHES 

THE MUTER COMPANY 



THE MUTER COMPANY 1255 S.MICHIGAN AVE., CHICAGO, ILL 




D. F. WELLS, new exec at the Hast- 
ings, Neb., jobber firm W. M. Dutton 
& Sons. Company recently annexed 
Emerson and Leonard. 



* Midwest - Timmermann Co., 
Davenport, la., one of the area's most 
important jobbers for Gmnow radio 
and refrigerators, has opened a large 
radio parts dept. under the manage- 
ment of >I. W. Berberet. Lines 
stocked are Tung-Sol, IKC, ComeU- 
DubiUer, Stancor, Webster-Chicago 
and Amphenol. 

* W. B. McCoy, formerly with 
an RCA-Victor distributor in New 
Orleans, has joined the staS of the 
Southern Equipment Co., San An- 
tonio, Tex., jobber for RCA and Kel- 
vinator. F. G. At^vater, official of 
the Southern firm, says that McCoy 
was "practically raised" promoting 
RCA and will now "ram rod" the 
line for the Texas company. 

•*• Supervised by Robert F. Wei- 
nig, Zenith's recently appointed au- 
tomotive radio head, meetings have 
been held in Chicago, New York, At- 
lanta, Kansas City, Los Angeles and 
San Francisco, at which jobbers saw 
the new 1937 line of car radio. 

* Jack Hennigh is the new branch 
manager of Spurrier's, Inc., Philco 

distributors of Wichita, Kan. Hen- 
nigh is a popular figure in Wichita's 
radio circles, and succeeds E. E. 
Branuner, who resigned as Spurrier's 
manager. 

* Home Modernizing Co., South 
Bend, Ind., have dolled up a trailer 
in green and ivory, the same colors 
as are featured at the firm's head- 
quarters. J. F. Donahue, company 
president, reports that success in con- 
tacting Emerson dealers with the 
outfit has been unusual. 

* To the sales force of the 
Cooper-Louisville Co., Crosley job- 
bers of Louisville, Ky., has been 
added the live-vrire appliance sales- 
man, Charles F. Lister. 



52 



Radio Today 




insure circuit stability. These accurate and conservatively rated 
units are the choice oF leading radio and instrument makers. 
Readins from left to right: H5, 5-watt, list, $.50; E2, 3-watt, 
list $.30; D2, 1-watt, list, $.20; G4, l/z-watt, list, $.17; M5, 
y2-walt, list, $.17; K7, Vi-watt, list, $.17. Ceramic insulation 
used on all except M5, which is insulated with molded bakelite. 
Specify CONTINENTAL Carbon insulated resistors]^on your 
next order. 

Just out — Handy Pocket Data on Radio Interference, an infor- 
mative up-to-date booklet which helps you sell radio inter- 
ference elimination service, price, 10c postpaid. 



Continental Carbon IncM 



13910 Lorain Ave., Cleveland, Ohio • Toronto, Canada 



(J/T^t^/^-CrU'f^.C^^f^ 



EW AERIALJ BY 



WARD 




MODEL S.T.R.-Tlie"Stratosphere"— List 
Price $5.00 — Maximum efficiency. En- 
hances beauty of any car. Also MODEL 
T.A.'Tui-rette" for windshields that open. 



MODEL A.L.T.- The "All-Range"- List Price $4.25 - For cars 
with windshields that open — Also MODEL A.L. for windshields 
that do not open. No drilling in top necessary. Fits all cars. 

MODEL F.L.-The "Flex-Rod"- List Price $3.50 - Sensational 
Hinge Aerial — Fits all cars — Flexible ~ Efficient — No drilling. 

IMPROVED MODEL H.P.R.- "Long-Range Twins" -List Price 
$4.00— America's Finest Running Board Aerial— simple installation. 



1937 
SEND 



CATALOG 
COUPON 



READY 
TODAY 



"Slie WARD PRODUCTS Cottu 



EBanBHiMi 



S«nd Wird'a 1937 A.* rul Catalog. 



SELL TUBES ON 




In the Tung-Sol consignment 
plan there's no such thing as 
tied-up capital. A stock of 
Tung-Sol radio tubes on your 
shelves means "velvet" sales. 
You pay only for tubes sold. 
Orders — not cash investment 
—keep your stock replenished. 
Desirable locations are still 
open for independent service 
organizations which can 
qualify. Write for the name of 
your nearest Tung-Sol tube 
wholesaler today. 

TUNG-SOL 

TUNG-SOL LAMP WORKS, INC. 

Radio Tube Division 

Sales Offices: Atlanta, Boston, Charlotte, Chicago, Dallas, Detroit, 

Kansas City, Los Angeles, New York. General Office: Newark, N.J. 



January, 1937 



53 



NEW THINGS FROM THE MANUFACTURERS 



Teletalk intercommunicating 

systems 

* Enlarged line of Webster tele- 
talk systems Include a master unit 
for use with several stations. Master 
station model has switch for selecting 
channel. Confidential models afford- 
ing privacy in conversation are also 
available. Separate volume control at 
each station and exceptional tone 
fidelity. Webster Electric Co., Racine, 
Wis. — Radio Todat 

Chassis cleaner 



inches. Black and silver panel. Model 
740— net .$18.60. Readrite Meter Works, 
Bluffton, Ohio — Radio Today 




* Premier electric blower for clean- 
ing dusty radio and amplifier chassis. 
Quickly removes all dust from the set. 
Electric Vacuum Cleaner Co., Inc., 
1734 Ivanhoe Rd., Cleveland, Ohio— 
Radio Today 



Skyscraper wind charger 

* DeLuxe Duncharger incorporat- 
ing the Dunn governing principle of 
automatically shifting propeller angle 
during high wind velocities. Sky- 
scraper model designed for 10-foot 
installation, giving increased power. 
Parris-Dunn Corp., Clarinda, Iowa — 
Radio Today— See also advt. p. 56. 

Ranger-Examiner multi-meter 




* AC-DC volt-ohm-milliameter. Volt- 
age range 0/10/50/250/1000 AC and 
DC at 1000 ohms per volt— 0/1/10/50/ 
250 mils. DC. Resistance scales 0/300/ 
250,000 with IVi volt battery. Housed 
In sturdy metal case with black 
enamel finish. Size 5% x 7% x 4% 



Offset screw drivers 



__J 




* Chrome-molybdenum offset screw 
drivers for reaching screws in difficult 
places. Servicemen will find many 
uses for this type of screw driver. 
Available in 4% inch (?.40), 6 and 8 
inch (1.50) sizes. Kraeuter & Co., 
Inc., 569 Eighteenth Ave., Newark, 
N. J. — Radio Today 



Sonotone hearing-aid radio 

* AC-DC radio with special attach- 
ment to permit reception by persons 
who are hard of hearing. One model 
has outlet for those persons already 
using a hearing aid for conversational 
purposes. Second model equipped 
with "oscillator" or bone conduction 
reproducer. Switch permits loud 
speaker to be on or off. Sonotone 
Corp., 19 W. 44th St., New York, N. Y. 
— Radio Today 



Clough-Brengle test equipment 




* R.F. signal generator for receiver 
alignment and testing. Dial scale 25 
inches per band — hand calibrated, ac- 
curacy V2 of 1 per cent. Modulated at 
400 cycles — separate attenuators for 
both audio and R.F. voltages. Avail- 
able for AC, AC-DC, battery operation. 
Model OC-A— list $29.95. 

Midget cathode ray oscillograph for 
visual alignment and receiver servic- 
ing. Uses new 913 cathode ray tube. 
Built-in sweep circuit, hori7ontal and 
vertical amplifiers. Housed in case 
8% x 814x9% inches. Model 105. 
Clough-Brengle Co., 2815 W. 19th St., 
Chicago, 111. — Radio Today — See also 
advt. p. 51. 

Crosley doublet antenna 

* All-wave doublet antenna which 
is practically equally efficient in re- 
ception of radio signals from all direc- 
tions. Designed for maximum signal 
strength and at the same time min- 
imizing static and noise. Crosley 
Radio Corp., 132 Arlington St., Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio — Radio Tod.\y 



Centralab switch kit 

* Assortment of wave-c h a n g e 
switch parts which make it possible 
to assemble any required type of 
switch — more than 150,000 combina- 
tions possible. Shorting and non- 
shorting types — sections for test equip- 
ment also available. Centralab, 900 
E. Keefe Ave., Milwaukee, Wis. — 
Radio Today* — See also advt. p. 30. 

Paper cased electrolytics 




■*■ New line of electrolytic conden- 
sers for service replacement and low 
power transmitters. Mounted in wax- 
sealed paper case with mounting 
flanges — constructed with Sprague 
moisture-proofing process. Available 
in 1 and 2 mfd. capacities — 400, 600, 
800, and 1,000-volt ratings. Sprague 
Products Co., North Adams, Mass. — 
Radio Today — See also advt. p. 47. 

Ecnerson antenna kit 

* All-\va^■e high-fidelity antenna 
kit. Provides maximum sensitivity on 
short wave, noise elimination on all 
bands including broadcast, and auto- 
matic tuning of antenna to desired 
station. Model W-78 — list ?5.00. Em- 
erson Radio & Phonograph Corp., Ill 
Eighth Ave., New York City^ — Radio 
Today 

Fairbanks-Morse refrigerators 




• 1937 line of "boxes" includes 8 
models, five in a D series with Con- 
servador, and three in a DX series 
without Conservador. Capacity ranges 
from 4.68 to 7.50 cu. ft. gross. Features 
are selective simplified temperature 
control, self-sealing crisper. three coats 



54 



Radio Today 



of Dulux, 2-way door opener, interior 
liglit, presto trays, motor protection 
and other items. Illustrated Is the D7 
Conservador— 7.50 cu. ft., 14.50 sq. ft. 
shelf area. Fairbanks, Morse & Co., 
Home Appliance Division, Indianapolis, 
Ind. — Radio Tod.\y — See also advt. p. 
46 

Sonora electric phonograph 



Oil burner interference 
supp;-e5:or 




* Concert grand electric phono- 
graph with amplifier using two 6L6 
output tubes. Individual volume and 
tone controls. Piezo astatic crystal 
pick — AC operated turntable — 13-lnch 
hi-fldelity speaker. Cabinet of matched 
walnut veneers. List $99.50. Table 
model list ?69.50. Sonora Electric 
Phonograph Co., Inc., 160 Varick St., 
New York City — R.\i)io Today 

Moisture-proofed 
paper condensers 

* Paper condenser impregnated 
with a new compound which insures 
the condenser from absorbing moisture. 
Made in accordance with RMA speci- 
fications. Unique shape eliminates r.f. 
pick-up. Coated with layer of alumi- 
num varnish. Dumont Electric Co., 
Inc., 514 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 
— Radio Today 

Grunow super-safe "boxes" 




■*■ New line of Grunow refrigerators 
includes 6 models, two standard, two 
de luxe and two super de luxe. Capac- 
ity varies from 5.52 cu. ft. gross to 
8.74. Special features include needle 
bar shelves, ice tray release, Carrene 
refrigerant, interior light, foot pedal 
door opener, rounded cabinet corners, 
deodorizer, water bottle (std. equip.), 
etc. Shown here is the 83WSD super 
de luxe — 8.74 cu. ft., 16.9 sq. ft. shelf 
area. General Household Utilities Co., 
Chicago, 111. — Radio Today 




* Ignition interference suppressor 
for use with oil burners. Resistance 
of 15,000 ohms — one inserted in each 
lead of the high tension circuit. 
Housed in Isolantite insulated tube. 
Has solderless cable terminal at one 
end and universal threaded stud at 
other — fits practically all standard 
transformers. Continental Carbon Co., 
13900 Lorain Ave., Cleveland, Ohio— 
Radio Today — See also advt. p. 53. 

Audio oscillator 

■*• Variable fixed frequency oscilla- 
tor for audio amplifier and speaker 
testing. Range 50 to 20,000 kc. in 10 
steps. Harmonic content less than 
6 per cent at 50 cycles and less at 
other frequencies. Output voltage of 
5 volts across high impedance load — 
0.5 volts at 500 ohms. Battery power 
supply. Net $23.95. Communication 
Instruments, Inc., 125 W. 40th St., 
New York City — Radio Today 



Ferranti hi-fi transformers 




* Two series of high-fidelity trans- 
formers for all audio circuits. Super 
models have frequency characteristic 
within 1 DB from 30-12,000 cycles. 
Ultra type within. V2 DB from 30- 
16,000 cycles. Available in all types 
for high-quality amplifier circuits. 
Ferranti Electric Co., 30 Rockefeller 
Plaza, New York City — Radio Today 

New receiving tubes 

* Past few weeks have witnessed 
introduction of several new tubes. 
1H4G 2-volt octal triode similar to 30; 
5U4G F.W. rectifier similar to 5Z3: 
6H5 tuning eye with current limiting 
grid similar to 6G5; Series of 150 mil 
octal 6 volt tubes — 6D8G converter 
fSASG), 6L5G triode (6C5G), 6S7G 
R.F. pentode (6D6), 6T7G duo-diode 
triode (6Q7G). 

25A7 metal output pentode; 25A7 
combined half wave rectifier (12Z3) 
and pentode (12A5). New beam power 
amplifiers: 6V6 and 6V6G similar to 
6L6 but less power; 25B6G and 25L6 
for AC-DC sets. 

These tubes have been announced by 
following manufacturers : 

Arcturus Radio Tube Co., 720 Frel- 



inghuysen Ave., Newark, N. J. — 1A4, 
1B4, 1C7G, 1F5G, 1H4G, 1H6G, 1J6G, 
5U4G, 5V4G, 5X4G, 5Y4G, 6B8G, 6E5, 
6G5. 

Hygrade Sylvania Corp., Emporium, 
Pa.— 5U4G, 6D8G, 6L5G, 6S7G, 6T7G, 
6V6, 6V6G, 25L6.— See a!so advt. p. 37. 

Hytron Corp., 23 New Derby St., 
Salem, Mass.— 25A7. 

Ken-Rad Corp., Owensboro, Ky. — 
1H4G, 5U4G, 6D8G, 6S7G, 6T7G, 25A6. 
— See also advt. p. 63. 

National Union Radio Corp., 570 
Lexington Ave., New York, N. Y. — 6H5. 
— See also advt. p. 59. 

Raytheon Production Corp., 420 Lex- 
ington Ave., New York, N. Y.— 6V6G, 
25B6G, 25L6G.— See also advt. p. 35. 

Triad Mfg. Co., Pawtucket, R. I.— 
25A7 — Radio Today — See also advt. 
p. 47. 

Grunow receivers 




* 5-tube AC-DC table receiver with 
dial mounted in center of speaker 
grille. Set tunes 550-1700 kc. Hori- 
zontal type cabinet with rounded col- 
umns at either side. List $29.95. An- 
other model is a 6-tube vertical table 
set with speaker mounted below the 
dial— tuning range 550-1700, 2000-7000 
kc— list $39.95. Third set a 7-tube 
console listing at $59.95 — tunes 550- 
1700, 2000-7000 kc. General Household 
Utilities Corp., 2638 N. Pulaski Rd., 
Chicago, 111. — Radio Today' 

Janette rotary converters 

* Complete line of rotary con- 
verters for changing DC to AC cur- 
rent — models for radio and sound 
apparatus. Radio models have filter 
effective from 10 to 547 meters. Stand- 
ard frequency is 60 cycles — input volt- 
age of 6, 12, 32, 115, 230 volts DC. 
Janette Mfg. Co., 556 W. Monroe St., 
Chicago, 111. — Radio Today 



Elamco amplifier 




* 14-watt power amplifier with 
high and low gain input channels. 
117 DB overall gain— 50-10,000-cycle 
response within 2 DB. Multiple out- 
put impedances. Provides field supply 
at 10,000 ohms, 16 watts. Field coils 
not necessary for operation. Model 
8-C with tubes— list $58.25. Electric 
Amplifier Corp., 135 W. 25th St., New 
Vork, N. Y. — Radio Today — see also 
advt. p. 52 



January, 1937 



55 



■ THE 

SKYSCRAPER 
DUNCHARGER 



«^^^^ 




Incorporating 
the Famous and 
Exclusive DUNN 
Governins Principlei 

The Higher the Tower, 
The Greater the Power! 

Dealer Price 
$1500 

(Including Tower) 




Far up above ordinary obstruction the sturdy 
SKYSCRAPER 10 FOOT Installation puts the 
Duncharger in ttie full unbroken wind stream 
where the slightest breeze can operate it with 
100% efficiency. 

DUNCHARGER ENGINEERING 

AGAIN IN THE LEAD! 

First to build a successful govern- 
ing device for a Tvind-charger» 
Parris-Dunn novF leads the field 
again nith a giant 10-foot unit, that 
^vill in practically every instance in- 
crease the power output by 25% or 
more, as compared to the old fash- 
ioned 6 foot unit. 

The New Skyscraper Duncharger, 
at no increase in price, represents 
the greatest wind-charger value 
ever offered the radio dealer. It's 
the finest battery radio ^^sales 
clincher" you*ve ever had. Feature 
the Duncharger and watch your 
radio sales grow ! 



MAIL THIS COUPON 



PARRIS-DUNN CORP. 

CLARINDA IOWA, U.S.A. 

20 Years of Successful Manufacturing Experience. 

Please send me full particulars of Skyscraper 
Duncharger and sensational Parris-Dunn Merclian- 
dising Prosram. 

Name 

Address 

City State 



DOPE ON DISTRIBUTORS 



* Philco jobbers, O'Brien Hard- 
ware Co., Devils Lake, N. D., have 
named two additional dealers: A. H. 
Dahl, Jalna, and James Fahey, War- 
wick, N. D. 

*• With the addition of the en- 
tire state of Maryland to its area, the 
Simon Distributing Corp., Washing- 
ton, D. C, now covers three major 
territories: Maryland, District of 
Columbia and Virginia. Simon's 
handle Motorola and have a branch 
in Richmond, Va. ; within the next 
few weeks another branch will be 
opened in Baltimore, Md. 

* I. H. Parks, official of the Auto 
Equipment Co., Denver, Colo., re- 
ports genuine success with a display 
booth at the recent Electrical Jubilee 
sponsored in Denver by the Electrical 
League of Colorado. Exhibit fea- 
tured Emerson sets and Norge refrig- 
erators. 

* At the Radio Maintenance Sup- 
ply Co., the jobbers of Worcester, 
Mass., who handle Admiral sets and 
National T7nion tubes, Everett Mer- 
riam has been added to the sales 
staff. 

* From John H. Ewinger & Son, 
the Philco jobbers of Burlington, la., 
comes the news that two new dealers 
have been appointed: Hatch Motor 
Co., Burlington, and Fairfield Elec. 
Co., Fairfield, la. 




* RCA jobbers are currently dis- 
tributing to dealers an elaborate 
"opera kit" plugging RCA's spon- 
sorship of Saturday afternoon broad- 
casts from the Metropolitan Opera 
House in New York, via NBC — Blue 
Network. Kit includes stories of the 
opera, banners and posters. Latter 
are issued to dealers weekly with 
names of current operas and artists. 
Special record albums are also being 
merchandised as a tie-in with the 
broadcasts. 

* Showroom and warehouse 
space at Wholesale Radio Service 
Co., Inc., New York City, has been 
increased to handle a new rush. Re- 
port from the company is that many 
of its patron service men have started 
selling Lafayette radios as holiday 
specials. 

* W. M. Button & Sons Co., Has- 
tings, Neb., have been appointed 
Emerson distributors. Dutton's big 
organization has been an important 
factor in the area for some 50 years. 
Company execs, H. A. Lainson and 
Don Wells, claim a record inventory 
in the Middle West during 7 years 
with Atwater Kent. 

* New sales manager at the 
Stanley Distributing Corp., Crosley 
jobbers of St. Louis, Mo., is WUllam 
Gaston. 



HculUr k^ 





STEVE KUGLER, head man at OK 
Appliance Corp., Denver jobbers, looks 
after Admiral sets in the Rockies. 



Jii 

DRESS UP! 

. . your profits with Radolek's Radio Supply Ser- 
vice! Radoiek Service is "tailored" to exactly fit 
your every radio requirement . . . and purse. Radoiek 
SPECIALIZES in Bi»i>iO the radio-man what he wants, 
when he wants it, and at the right prices. The 1937 
Radoiek Radio Profit Guide is just off the press. 
Completely new! Over 12,C00 values! Hundreds of 
new items. Merchandise 
you've never seen before. 
Repair Parts, Radio 

Sets, Amplifiers, Test 

iBlT'fe^ ^Hll Instruments, Tubes, 
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this complete "guide" 
to greater profits. Send 
for yours today. FREE! 

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601 W. RANDOLPH, CHICAGO, DEPT D3 

Send me the Radoiek Radio Profit Guide FREE. 

Name 

Address 

Serviceman? D Dealer? D Experimenter? □ 




56 



Radio Today 



ON THE TRADE TICKER 



* Advance showings of 17 new 
RCA radio models have been staged 
in various parts of the country for 
the firms' jobbers. New-year sales 
plans were announced b> Paul C. 
Richardson, RCA-Victor's radio and 
phonograph division manager, and 
Thomas F. Joyce, ad manager, has 
announced a vigorous ad and sales 
promotion campaign. 

■* Sixty members of Chicago radio 
gentry went to a bachelor dinner 
given to E. G. May, ad manager for 
Sentinel Radio Corp., at Harry's New 
York Bar, Jan. 8. George Russell, 
Sentinel's sales manager, was toast- 
master, seconded by E. A. Alschuler, 
the company's president. Mr. May 
was married on Jan. 16 to Miss Lil- 
lian Nape. 

* Radio and refrigeration divi- 
sion of the Stewart-Wamer Corp., 
Chicago, has a new advertising man- 
ager in the person of C. C. DeWees. 
For many years DeWees worked in 
SW sales promotion, then became as- 
sistant ad manager, and now reaches 
the dept. top. F. R. Cross continues 
as general advertising manager for 
the parent company. 

* Harrison J. Cowan, advertising 
manager for Dictograph Products Co., 
Inc., is leaving that organization to 
establish his own advertising agency 
in New York. Associated with him 
will be Arnold Van Leer, well known 
motion picture publicist. New agency 
will be known as Cowan & Van Leer, 
Inc., with offices at 521 Fifth Ave., 
and will operate as a general adver- 
tising agency, emphasizing merchan- 
dising, sales promotion and special 
exploitation. 




* Further progress has been re- 
ported by the Galvin Mfg. Co. on the 
construction of its new two-story fac- 
tory and office building at 454 5 W. 
Augusta Blvd., Chicago. Handsome 
terra cotta plant will add 85,000 sq. 
ft. to space for making Motorola 
auto and home sets, will cost $2 50,- 
000 and will be finished by April 1, 
1937. Firm's new line of car radios 
was announced this month, and its 
new line of home sets will be in pro- 
duction in early Spring. 



* Greatly increased volume in 
19 37 for Simplex Radio Co. is antici- 
pated by Sidney H. Gatty, metropoli- 
tan sales and export manager, 132 
Nassau St., New York. Mr. Gatty 
says 1936 was one of the most suc- 
cessful years in the history of the 
company. In addition to a complete 
line of sets, Simplex 1937 plans will 
emphasize a strict jobber policy and 
will include an extensive promotion 
program consisting of national space 
and radio time. 

* Belden Mfg. Co., Chicago, has 
found it necessary to increase its 
manufacturing facilities in both the 
Chicago and Richmond, Ind., plants. 
New building program will cost over 
$120,000. 




P. R. "TOD" REED, past year ad 

manager for Grunow, now assistant 

sales mgr. in charge of ads. 




Dispinv 

RflDIOBDR 

WITH 

PHILCO 

in yatzT WindoM^ • • • and 
Watch the Bttyers Come In! 



Radiobar has a tremendous 
pulling power, drawing people 
irresistibly into the store. 
The Radiobars that you sell to 
some of them, and the radios 
that you sell to the others, 
will quickly change yourwhole 
profit picture. 

RADIOBAR I 

CO. oF AMERICA I 

60 WARREN STREET I 
NEW YORK CITY, N. V. I 



7100 
LOS 



McKINLEY 
ANGELES, 



AVE. 
CAL. 



For extra profits — easy profits 
— sure profits, mail the coupon 
below for Radiobar's com- 
plete merchandising plan and 
dealer-helps. A great profit- 
opportunity, with powerful 
promotion and advertising 
back of it. 



Mail Today to Nearest Off/cc-Dept. RT137 | 

RADIOBAR CO. OF AMERICA | 

60 Warren Street, New York Cily or | 

7100 McKinley Ave., Los Angeles ■ 

Send your complete story to : ■ 

Name | 

Street | 

City & State I 



January, 1937 



57 



NOKOIL 

The recognized Standard 

of comparison for 

Permanent Magnet Speakers 




Nokoil 



Radio 
Public Address 

iNTERCOMViUNICATION SySTEMS 

"A NOKOIL Speaker 
for every purpose" 

Send for prices and catalog de- 
scribing the 10 different Nokoil 
models. 

Ask for the name of our nearest 
distributor. Wright - DeCoster 
distributors are always anxious 
to cooperate. 

WRIGHT-DeCOSTER, Inc. 

2265 University Avenue, St. Paul, Minnesota 

Export Dept.: M. Simons & Son Co., New York 

Cable Address: "Simontrice" 

Canadian Office: 

Associated Sales Co., Guelph, Ont. 




Na-Ald'S new adapter 

Tests Over 100 
Ocfal - Based Tubes! 

Simply use the adapter in 
ANY tube checker which can 
test a type 36 tube. Simple 
directions on base of adanter 
with chart for "good" readings. 
Toggle switch tests both plates. 
!>50 GEM Octal Testing 
Adapter. List Price SU.no 

Here Is the Last Word 
in an Analyzer P/ug.' 

For those who want the latest, 
most compact plug. The insertio' 
of the analyzer plug prongs in'o 
the socket contacts is ma-fe 
through special compact transfer 
units using very short moldings 
thus enabling any conceivable in- 
terconnection of circuits to allow 
testing any circuit whatsoever 
Generous molded insulation for 
each wire lead. No studs for ultra 
compactness. S-mooth working, bull- 
dog grip latch on plug relea<:es 
instantly at touch on latch. Ten 
prorg cable plug with socket to 
match. Special Na-Ald processei 
contacts as used in sockets mak- 
ing 2 million perfect contacts 
without failure. 

90S C\ KIT supplied with 4. 
5. 6. 7 sm., 7 Ig., and octal 
adapters complete as illus- 
trated. List Price.... $ll.r»0 

Here Is Socket Perfection! 

A socket designed especially for 
best quality instruments to g've 
permanently dependable contacts. 
AM types available. 
Any Single Tube Type 
liist Price 40c e:i. 
Any Composite Type 

List Price 50c ea. 
Write for literature describing 
above and latest in plugs and con- 
"TF" SOCKETS nectors, adapters, etc.. of all types 





(^ffl) 



ALDEN PRODUCTS CO. Dept. RTl 
715 Centre St., Brockton. Mass. 



TRADE FLASHES 



* Institute of Radio Engineers, 

Emporium, Pa., section, held their 
most recent meeting Jan. 14 with 
H. H. Beverage as speaker. Bever- 
age is chief research engineer for 
RCA Commxmications, Inc. Empo- 
rium is the Pennsylvania city famous 
as the home of Hygrade Sylvania 
Corp. 

* Webst«r Electric Co., Racine, 
Wis., has announced the appointment 
of the Kay Sales Co., Tulsa, Okla., 
as district sales representative for 
the states of Oklahoma, Arkansas 
and extreme western Tennessee. 
Plans are that J. P. Kay, manager of 
Kay Sales, will personally supervise 
the merchandising of Webster Elec- 
tric sound equipment, pickups and 
Teletalk. 

♦ Radio Technicians Guild of 
Massachusetts has elected officers: 
S. S. Malo, president; G. L. Chapman, 
vice-pres. ; G. \V. Feldman, secretary; 
F. L. Kennes, treasurer, and W. F. 
Staples, librarian. Feldman's secre- 
tarial headquarters are at 54 6 Wash- 
ington St., Boston. 

♦ Clarostat points to the selection 
of George D. Norris, Seattle, Wash., 
as sales representative for Washing- 
ton, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, North- 
ern Utah and Southern British Co- 
lumbia. Norris will connect with 
jobbers of these areas, as well as the 
few manufacturers. 

♦ Motorola announces the ap- 
pointment of Walter H. Stellner as 

assistant sales manager of its house- 
hold division in full charge of ad- 
vertising and sales promotion for 
home sets. Stellner was for the past 
5 j'ears advertising and promotion 
manager of RCA-Victor's radio and 
phonograph division; at an earlier 
date he was an ad exec at RCA's 
Chicago branch, and more recently 
he managed promotion for Radiola 
Distributing. 

♦ After a long airplane trip 
through Central and South America 
and Mexico, John F. Royal, NBC's 
vice-pres. in charge of programs, has 
returned to New York. Point of the 
trip was to arrange a regular ex- 
change of programs between NBC 
and the Latin-American countries. 

* Part of Fada's increased sales 
activity has been to assign sales pro- 
motion manager George A. Lyons to 
work directly with dealers and dis- 
tributors in the North Central states. 
Other Fada announcement is that 
after Jan. 1, Joseph Gerl, Midwest 
rep., will leave the company and 
shift his interest to refrigerators and 
associated lines. 

* Commander E. F. McDonald, 

Jr., president of Zenith Radio, is re- 
ceiving congratulations as the father 
of a baby girl who arrived at Hen- 
rotin Hospital, Chicago, Jan, 2. Com- 
mander McDonald is a member of the 
hospital's board of directors and has 
been one of its chief benefactors for 
many j'ears. 



Replacement 

"^^^ METAl-TUBE 



RESISTORS 



The original and perfected 
unit. Use it for satisfac- 
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• 
A precisely matched unit 
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• 

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of 



types 
type re- 
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big 80-page volume-control replacement manual. 



CLAROSTAT 

^WU. 3»IAXI;F.*CTi;ni.^« CO. 
f^ ^ % Incorpo 

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NEW! SENSATIONAL 
AUDITION EQUIPMENT 




The 3-A is a 32-watt amplifier which with its 18- 
itich Super Giant Speaker has an acoustic sound output 
equal to a 214-watt system. It will drive one to four 
Super Giant Speakers to completely cover the largest 
indoor enclosure, and will comfortably and easily cover 
50,000 to 100,000 people. An unequalled booster ampli- 
fier to raise the power of existing PA equipment, the 
3-A provides flexibility never before available. 
Send in the coupon today for complete details on this 
sensational NEW audition equipment. 

McMURDO SILVER 

MASTERPIECE AMPLIFIERS 

Full Details Free. Mail This Coupon. 

McMURDO SILVER CORP. 
2900-J So. Michigan Blvd. 
Chicago, III., U.S.A. 

Please rush me full details on new 3-A Masteriiiece 
Audition Equipment. 

Name 

Address 



58 



Radio Today 



* Electrical Appliance Dealers 
Ass'ii of Brooklyn, N. Y., at its meet- 
ing of Jan. 6 elected officers for 
19 37: Russell A. Atkinson, presi- 
dent; James J. Schneer, first vice- 
president; Ralph Ceriello, second 
vice-president; Albert H. Bemhard, 
secretary; A. H. Grafenstadt, treas- 
urer, and Sam Klein, sergeant-at- 
arms. 

* J. P. Kennedy, formerly ac- 
count executive for Tlie Fensholt Co., 
■svas named sales and advertising 
manager of the Triumph Mfg. Co. of 
Chicago, Jan. 1st. Mr. Kennedy 
■worked his way through the Univer- 
sity of Notre Dame repairing and sel- 
ing radios, finding time to be a mem- 
ber of the Fighting Irish boxing team 
and a radio instructor. Later he 
operated a radio sales and service 
store until becoming advertising and 
opr \rp na-iager of a wholesale radio 
parts firm in Chicago, from which he 
advanced to his position of account 
executive in the advertising agency. 
In this position he prepared the ad- 
vertising for the All Star Junior 
campaign for eleven manufacturers 
and for Thordarson, Burgess. Bel- 
mont, Aladdin and Continental Car- 
bon. Mr. Kennedy expects to develop 
the direct-to-dealer sales policy of 
the Triumph Mfg. Co. and to seek 
new markets for radio and electrical 
instruments. 

* The Radelma Company, 16 
Hudson Street. New York, has been 
established by Han-y Adelnian to 
operate in the export field. Com- 
pany will serve as American purchas- 
ing agents for foreign concerns and 
as exporting agents for American 
radio lines. Principals of Radelma 
have been intimately connected with 
the radio industry for 16 years. 

* Electronic liaboratoiies, Inc., 

Indianapolis, Ind., has announced the 
appointment of Harry Gerber, Bos- 
ton, Mass., as their representative in 
New England. Gerber is a vet in 
that area; four years ago he pre- 
sented to iobbers there the firs'- and 
original line of replacement con- 
denser.'--- thosi- of tli(> s;iiiii> roiiipany. 




* Sparton Old Timers, an inter- 
factory organization at the Sparks- 
Withington Co., Jackson, Mich., held 
their annual banquet early this 
month, with Capt. William Sparks on 
hand as usual. Club is active in 
welfare work and all members have 
been continuously employed by the 
company for at least five years. More 
than 1,000 employees now belong. 

■*• J. D. .Jordan, formerly service 
manager of Genei'al Household Util- 
ities Co., Chicago, has been trans- 
ferred to the research and develop- 
ment department in charge of tele- 
vision experiments. Glenn A. Pres- 
ton has been named service manager 
to fill Jordan's former post. T'restnn 
formerly was in charge of sales sta- 
tistical data and franchise depart- 
ment. 



* Ward Products Corp., makers 
of auto aerials and sound systems, 
have recently moved into their own 
new building on East 45th St., Cleve- 
land. Ohio. Manufacturing space has 
been doubled and sales offices en- 
larged. Ward has a branch in Can- 
ada and an export office in New 
York City. 

* Factory formerly occupied by 
the Audiola radio plant of Fairbrnks, 
Morse & Co., 430 S. Green St.. Chi- 
cago, has been rented by the Arlab 
Mfg. Co., manufacturers of magnetic 
and dynamic speakers. Arlab re- 
cently acquired the Baritone Radio 
Corp. and will continue to manufac- 
ture all the firm's products under the 
supervision of Baritone's former chief 
ensineer. Waiter •>. I'aredes. 



C. M. WILSON will now sales man- 
age the radio section of GE appliances. 



NATIONA 
A U T H 
BY JOHN F. 
OFFER MAN 




L UNION 

R I Z E 

RIDER TO 

UALS FREE 



1 „ nf\L\i\^^ 

I I 






Mr. John F. Uider, \otvii 
Author of Service Books 

% A necessity of modern service work is 
complete technical data on all makes of 
radio receivers. Mr. John F. Rider recognized 
this need years ago and compiled a great li- 
brary of radio set circuits and information. 
National Union also knew how important serv- 
ice manuals would be. National Union decided 
that every service specialist in the country 
must have the chance to own the manuals 
compiled by Mr. Rider. National Union there- 
fore makes it possible to get this library FREE. 
All seven volumes are given with the purchase 
of N.U. tubes . . . and N.U. is officially author- 
ized by Mr. Rider to offer his great service li- 
brary FREE. If you want any one or all of 
the Rider Service Manuals write now, ask how 
to get them or consult with your National 
Union distributor! 

FREE SHOP EQUIPMENT. TOO! 

No need for the alert and aggressive service 
expert to read about all the fine scientific in- 
struments which service equipment manufac- 
turers are making and wish that he might own 
them. Why? He can own them! How? By 
getting them Free with the purchase of Na- 
tional Union radio tubes. 

National Union has given servicemen through- 
out the United States more than 50,000 pieces 
of fine equipment. If you're not taking advan- 
tage of National Union's service dealer plan, 
you're missing the greatest opportunity in the 
radio industry today. 

All you do is contract to purchase a few tubes 
per week, place a small deposit, which refunded 



to you after the tube purchase is completed 
and the instrument you have selected is yours 
"for keeps," without any strings attached. 
Meanwhile, remember that you have the use 
of the instrument all during the time tube 
purchases are being made. 

ABOUT N. U. RADIO TUBES 

National Union manufactures a 
complete line of radio tubes in 
glass, metal and G-type. National 
Union's high quality has made 
them the outstanding favorites in 
the radio service profession. All 
sales policies have been formulated 
with the idea of making National 
Union radio tubes the Ideal re- 
placement tube for the radio dealer. 
This has been backed up with a 
selling program that means real 
support and help to the wide-awake 
dealer. Dealers and jobbers han- 
dling National Union radio tubes 
are the leaders in repair parts and service. 




RT137 I 
I 
I 



NATIONAL UNION RADIO CORP. 
570 Lexington Ave., New York City 

Tell me how to get Rider Senice Manuals and 
other free equipment. 

Xiiine 

Street 

City State 



January, 1937 



59 




Matched! 



ic Kxact - duplicate condenser replace- 
ments for any standard make of set. 

if Precisely matched electrically, me- 
chanically, visually. 

• FIT right, LOOK right, T\ ORK right — 
the only Tvay to do a real servicing job. 

ir Yet they cost no more than a make- 
shift collection of standard condensers, 
usually lots less for material and labor. 

Send for CATALOG : contains 

several 
pages of exact-duplicate condenser listings, 
as well as other condensers and resistors of 
AEROVOX line. 



EKOvm 



CORPORATION 



70 Washington St 



Brooklyn. N. Y. 



TRADE FLASHES 



* Radio Dealers' Association of 
Xew Orleans, one of the 12 organ- 
izations which make up the local 
Electrical Association, recently were 
entertainment hosts at a lively ban- 
quet at the swank Roosevelt Hotel. 
Affair was a record one in point of 
attendance; J. E. Muniot. Jr., presi- 
dent of the radio dealers' group, esti- 
mated that 4 50 persons were guests. 

* Following the announcement 
by Charles E. Wilson, vice-president 
in charge of the appliance and mer- 
chandise dept. of the General Electric 
Co., that Ralph J. Cordiner, formerly 
manager of the radio division, had 
been made assistant manager of the 
appliance and merchandise dept., 
Bridgeport, Conn., came the news 
that Ernest H. Vogel has been ap- 
pointed manager of the radio sales 
division, with C. M. Wilson succeed- 
ing him as radio sales manager. 

■* Glenn Browning, chief engi- 
neer, Tobe Deutschmarm Corp., re- 
cently gave a talk and demonstration 
on the Audi-O-Graph for the Elec- 
tronics Associates at the Harvard 
Institute of Geographical Explora- 
tions in Cambridge, Mass. 

* Samuel A. Gomez has been ap- 
pointed South American representa- 
tive for the Federal Sales Co., Chi- 
cago radio hardware center. 



OPERADIO QUALITY MEANS DOLLARS TO YOU 

The name OPERADIO has always meant good sound equipment . . . high- 
grade dependable merchandise, reasonably priced. That means dollars 
and cents to you ... a good profit, quick turnover and no costly 
calling back on the customer to fix equipment that has broken 
down. When you buy sound or P.A. equipment BUY 



UNIT- MATCHED EQUIPMENT 



All equipment is unit- 
matched" to insure a fine, 
well - rounded performance; 
and each piece is marked 
with the name *'OPERADIO" 
. . . your guarantee of the 
best sound equipment that 
money can buy at a price no 
more than the ordinary. 

The Operadio line is un- 
equalled for completeness 
... including public address 
systems, speakers, amplifiers, 
paging systems, microphones, 
all component parts and ac- 
cessories. Especially popular 
and profitable is the MODEL 
111 AMPLIFIER PAGIXG 
SYSTEM (illustrated). 

Send in your name to receive cata- 
logs and a free copy of 
THE SOUND ADVISOR. 
Address Dept. RT. 

OPERADIO 

MANUFACTURING CO. 

ST. CHARLES, ILLINOIS 




Model 111 Amplifier Paging System 

A complete paging system for factories, hotels, pub- 
lic buildings, theatre dressing rooms and similar 
places. This system is equipped to use up to 12 
speakers and comes complete with contact crystal 
microphone mounted on a beautiful stand, a special 
amplifier with its tubes which mounts on the wall 
at some convenient place near the microphone, a 
foot switch for use when talking, and a complement 
ot 4 permanent magnet dynamic speakers in attrac- 
tive steel wall cabinet. 




W. H. STELLNER, Motorola's as- 
sistant sales manager of Household 
Division. 

* Lee McCamie, secretary and 
radio sales manager of the Strom- 
berg-Carlson Telephone Mfg. Co., 
spoke before a joint meeting of the 
Rochester Section, American Insti- 
tute of Electrical Engineers and the 
Rochester Engineering Society, Jan. 
5. Stibject was "Voice Paging Sys- 
tems." 

* Announcement has been made 
of the formation of the new Bendlx 
Aviation Export Corp., through which 
will clear the world-wide trade of the 
Bendlx Aviation Corp. and its affili- 
ated companies. New corporation 
will have its main oflBces at 2 30 Park 
Afe., headed by Howard S. Welch, 
formerly president of the Studebaker 
Pierce-Arrow Export Corp. and since 
1935 chief of the Automotive Aero- 
nautics Division of the U.S. Dept. of 
Commerce. 

* Quam Nichol's chief engineer, 
"Ted"Trzyna, has returned to Chi- 
cago headquarters after a trip to the 
Pacific Coast. Trzyna was busy work- 
ing along with the engineer groups 
of the Pacific's set makers and re- 
ported general success. Quam Nich- 
ols has recently inaugurated a profit- 
sharing plan for its employees. 

* Henry Ii. Crowley & Co. have 
named LeRoy Schenck, 570 Lexing- 
ton Ave., New York City, as manu- 
facturers' representative for the met- 
ropolitan area and New Jersey. 
Schenck will handle manufacturers' 
and jobbers' sales on Crolite prod- 
ucts, condensers, resistors, ceramics 
and Magicores. 

* Frederick B. Gleason, general 
commercial manager for the Western 
Electric Co., has retired from his po- 
sition and is succeeded by Douglas 
F. G. Eliot, formerly personnel di- 
rector for the firm. 

* Solar Mfg. Corp., 599 Broad- 
way, N.Y.C., makers of radio and 
electric parts, has announced a 5 per 
cent wage increase to its 750 em- 
ployees. 



60 



Radio Today 




ADIO'S 
FAVORITE 
VOICE" 

5-inch Standard Dynamic 

A THOROUGHLY engineered and 
carefully designed Dynamic 
with excellent tonal qualities and 
the exclusive QUAM completely 
"weatherproofed Armored Field 
Coils. A husky speaker with a 
conservative output rating of 3.5 
watts, ideally built and priced 
for use in AC-DC sets and small 
table models. 

Licensed under QUAM Patents 

QUAM-NICHOLS CO. 



Chicago 

33rd Place & Cottage 

Grove Avenue 



New York, N. Y. 
1674 Broadway 





WARD LEONARD 

TRANSMITTER 
CONTROL PANEL 

1. Provides a time delay to allo^v poTver 
tubes and rectifiers to attain proper 
operating- temperatures. 2. Permits re- 
moving plate snpply for transmitter 
adjustments ivithout interrupting fila- 
ment supply. 3. Protects plate supply 
from overloads, 4. May be operated 
from several remote points. 5. Stand- 
ard relay rack mounting. 

warB~leonard 
electric company 

MOUNT AIIRNON, NEW YORK 

Please send me your new Bulletin 507C. 

Name 

Address 

City State 

Jobber's Xame RT 



* R. G. Karet, director of sales, 
wholesale radio division, Utah Radio 
Products Co.. Chicago, is currently 
contacting the trade in New York 
state. Pennsylvania and New England 
in connection with merchandising 
plans for 1937. 

* H. E. Capehart, vice-president 
and general manager of the Rudolph 
Wurlitzer Mfg. Co., North Tona- 
wanda, N. Y., manufacturer of "Sim- 
plex" coin-operated phonographs, 
was host to more than one thousand 
members of the coin-operated phono- 
graph industry at a banquet and 
show given Sunday night, December 
6th, at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel 
New York. 

* When E. G. Biechler, general 
manager, Frigidaire division. General 
Motors Sales Corp., recently con- 
gratulated his national sales organ- 
ization on its 193 6 sales record, he 
added: "Soon you will have new 
and more salable products, featuring 
a revolutionary improvement that 
will be the talk of the industry and 
instantly capture the imagination of 
the public." 

* Second expansion program 
undertaken by the Erie Resistor 
Corp. in the last 3 years has re- 
sulted in a recently completed addi- 
tion to its main factory at Erie, Pa. 
New annex houses the plastic mold- 
ing division and general offices of the 
company. Harold C. Sherk, vice- 
president and general manager of 
the firm, points out that to have the 
molding, finishing and enginering ac- 
tivities under one roof will greatly 
increase Erie's operating efficiency. 

* Harrj- J. Scheel. newly ap- 
pointed export sales manager for the 
Majestic Radio and Television Corp., 

announces the opening of the Majes- 
tic export sales division with offices 
at 3 30 South Wells St., Chicago. 

* Impressive advertising stunt 
in use at the Paramount Radio Shop, 
Omaha. Neb., gives manufacturers a 
chance to take some elaborate dis- 
playing off the dealer's hands. Para- 
mount has erected a giant neon sign, 
74 ft. long, which has interchange- 
able letters. Makers of the lines 
which the store carries are given 
monthly turns at advertising their 
products. Store has finished a big 
expansion program; handles Stewart- 
Warner, Leonard, Crosley, Kelvina- 
tor, and Fairbanks-Morse. 

* Jack Silver, pioneer distributor 
of auto radio and president of the 
Jackson Distributing Co., Chicago, 
passed away Dec. 24 after an illness 
of 5 months. Mr. Silver was one of 
the first territorial jobbers for Motor- 
ola and had been connected with the 
Galvin Mfg. Corp. for 13 years. 

* William C. Stoner is the new 

head of a department recently organ- 
ized by the Crosley Radio Corp. to 
assist jobbers to organize and to 
train their salesmen. Stoner has been 
district manager in Kansas, Missouri 
and Colorado; H. A. Armbright will 
now take that job. 



* New York dealers recently 
took on a new portable recorder, in- 
troduced by Presto Recording Corp. 
as a low-priced gadget to record 
parties and home entertainments, 
children's voices, favorite radio pro- 
grams or sound for home movies. 
One dealer started to make records 
for customers; grossed $64 the first 
day. Another had sold 2 of the in- 
struments within 45 minutes after he 
got the machines. 



* Wesley M. Angle, president of 
Stromberg-Carlson Telephone Mfg. 
Co., picked up some lively news on 
a recent trip through Texas and Mis- 
souri. Business in those states runs 
at an unusually high level. 




RADIO 

BUSINESS 

TM»tMitu>n Oftcl 

htAtUUtaHMf 

By A. A. Ghirardi and T. S. Ruggles 

YES — 2,199 money-meking ideas for building 
up your business. Ideas that have already been 
TESTED and PROVED SUCCESSFUL— 1 00% 
sound and practical. Ideas you can put to work 
TODAY and turn into profit. 

It's a WHALE OF A BOOK! Its got EVERY- 
THING you want to know about how to really run 
a radio business successfully — plans, methods, 
ideas For selling, advertising, merchandising, 
publicity, accounting, management, etc., etc. 
Applies to sale of sets, service. Auto Radio, P. A. 
work, home appliances. 

The First and Only Book of Its Kind! 



The mart 
ivho uses 
this boo\ is 
hound to 
mal{e more 
money in 
1937' 



CLIP<s^MAIL 





RADIO & 
TECHNICAL 
PUBL. CO. 

45 Astor PI,, New York 

Dept. RT0.17 



Please send me free circular BB. 






January, 1937 



61 



NEW 



Non-Reactive Dynamic Beam- 
Power Amplifier and Streamlined 
Bullet Electro-Dynamic Micro- 
phone. 



Available at an almost unbeliev- 
able Low Price'. 

Provides unrestricted frequency 
response, non-reuctive signal di- 
vision, two-phase bridge rectifi- 
cation, stabilized power supply, 
variable polar response, etc., etc. 

Write for Circular No. 3713 for 
complete details and prices of 
this omazing sound system devel- 
opment by A. C. Sftaney. 

AMPLIFIER CO. OF AMERICA 

43 West ZOth St., New York, N. Y. 




HOT BOOKLETS 



* Hammarlund Mfg. Co., 424 West 
33rd St., N. Y. C, will send on request 
its new "37" catalog, a special type 
of booklet which includes stock sizes 
and graphic detail. Author and orig- 
inator of the publication is Lewis 
Winner. 

■* Pamphlet on the operation and 
installation of modern short-wave sets, 
prepared by the Radio Manufacturers' 
Association for the U.S. Dept. of Com- 
merce, has been published by the U.S. 
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Com- 
merce. Latter bureau distributes 
it at 25 cents per copy; booklet pre- 
sents complete details on all important 
aspects of short-wave listening. 

* Boonton Radio Corp., Boonton, 
N. J., will send on request a new bul- 
letin titled "The Humidity Factor in 
Radio Work." Data includes graphs 
on the effect of moisture on wire in- 
sulation and on trimmer condensers. 

* New and complete description 
of over 20 Instruments will be found 
in a new 1937 test equipment catalog 
issued by Clough-Brengle, 2815 West 
19th St., Chicago, who send copies on 
request. 

* Universal Microphone Co., Ingle- 
wood, Cal., has issued two new and 
completely illustrated instruction 
sheets for its loose leaf catalog. 



* Hygrade Sylvania Corp., Empo- 
rium, Pa., is ready with its third and 
latest edition of its "Technical Man- 
ual," a 184-page booklet covering 193 

current types of receiving tubes. Man- 
ual is marked 15 cents. 

* Just off the press is a new cat- 
alog titled "Resistors and Volume 
Controls" presented by International 
Resistance Co., 401 N. Broad St., 
Philadelphia. 

* New bulletin, illustrated Avith 
photos and diagrams, will be sent on 
request by Radio Receptor Co., Inc., 
110 Seventh Ave., New York City; 
booklet features the "Series 7 dynamic 
mikes." 

* Furnished free of charge to job- 
bers, dealers and servicemen is a new 
revised characteristic chart offered by 
Champion Radio Works, Lynn, Mass. 
Complete line of Champion resistance 
tubes is covered in the chart. 

* As a supplement to Its 80-page 
Volume Control Replacement Guide 
issued several months ago, Clarostat 
Mfg. Co., Inc., 285 North 6th St., Brook- 
lyn, N. Y., now offers a handy refer- 
ence list of exact duplicate volume 
control replacements arranged by 
type numbers. 

+ Complimentary copies of a new 
"Manual A, Covering Tube and Radio 
Test Instrument Design," will be sent 
free to readers who request them. 
The 60-page illustrated booklet, 
marked 15 cents, is issued by Supreme 
Instruments Corp., Greenwood, Miss. 



€-D lifGIllllES 

^ DYKANOL 
IMPREGNATED 
AND FILLED 





The type XL series of high voltage filter 
condensers were designed for power sup- 
lies, high power amplifiers, television cir- 
cuits, transceivers, etc. Hermetically 
sealed in round aluminum containers, 
similar to those employed in the con- 
struction of electroyltic capacitors. One 
terminal is insulated, the other grounded. 
Can be conveniently mounted in either 
upright or inverted position. 

LISTING 



Cap. 


D.C. Work 


11 g 




I 


Mfd. 


Voltage 


Size 


Cat. No. 


List 


2 


600 


2% x l'/2 


TL- 6020 


$2.25 


3 


600 


41/2 X 11/2 


TL. 6030 


2.75 


4 


600 


41/2 X 11/2 


TL- 6040 


3.00 


i 


1000 


2% X 11/2 


TL-10010 


2.25 


2 


1000 


41/2 X 11/2 


TL-10020 


2.75 


..S 


1500 


2% X 11/2 


TL-15005 


3.00 


^ 


1500 


41/2 X 1/2 


TL-15010 


3.50 



A post-card will bring you Catalog 1 3SA 
or see your local jobber. 

CORNiLL-DUBILIER CORPORATION 
1022 Hamilton Blvd., So. Plainfield, N. J. 







DYNAMIC MICROPHONES 

Are Increasing in Popularity 




because they 



— have greater sensitivity 

— are free from inductive pickup 

— have no background noise 

— can work with long lines 

— are sturdiest ever produced 

— are weatherproof 

— are small in size 

— are reasonable in price 

Ws solicit requests for special sound and amplifying equipment. 
Send for our latest Bulletin 3013. 
We are pleased to send this to you. 

RADIO RECEPTOR CO., Inc. 

110 SEVENTH AVENUE, NEW YORK, N. Y. 



62 



Radio Today 




COMPLETE ELECTRIC PLANTS 

ONAX ALTERNATING CURRENT 
GENERATING PLANTS furnish the 
same electricity as city power lines. Made 
in sizes 3 50 to 10,000 watts to meet the 
requirements of those who must provide 
their own electricity for Farms, Summer 
Camps, Cottages, Boats, Commercial Pur- 
poses. 

OPERATE A. C. RADIO 
These A. C. Plants operate RADIO, 
HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES. WATER 
PUMP, MOTORS — anything that nor- 
mally would operate from city lines. Will 
run Public Address Systems, Demonstrat- 
ing Car Equipment, Talking Moving Pic- 
tures, X-Ray. 

MODERN CONSTRUCTION 

ONAN PLANT Engines are like the Motor 
Car, Truck or Tractor Engines. Operate 
on Gasoline, Gas or Distillate. Wiring and 
Installation is the same as for standard ap- 
plications. Also 32 volt, Direct Current 
Models. 

Write for details 

D. W. ONAN & SONS 



5 69 Royalston Ave. 



Minneapolis. Minn. 



ONfieiJSTOMlR 

TELLS ANOTHER 

The "good word" ^^- 

about ken-Rad Tubes 
spreads, and you ^ 



iiie.r.c iMuic iMuricy. 

Take the first step to 

building better busi- ;j 

ness by writing for ^\\ 

our sales plan. 1| 

Manufacturers of a complete line 
of Standard Glass Types, G Series, 
and Genuine All-Metal Radio Tubes. 

Ken-Rad 

Radio Tubes 

KEN-RAD TUBE « LAMP CORPORATION, In 




SALES PRIMERS 



ILLUMINATED ACTION 

• Flashy display to feature auto- 
matic tuning has been built by Pliilco 
and already ordered by 3,500 dealers. 
The dramatic display has a girl with 
one arm In constant motion, amid 
brilliant colors, operating a huge dial 
which also moves. Lights behind the 
words, "Click . . . there's your sta- 
tion!" flash on and off, and lights for 
the call letters on the dial are another 
feature. 

Philco also has a similar silent dis- 
play in the form of a full-colored lith- 
ographed window item featuring auto- 
matic tuning. Company's current 
promotional schedule includes other 
dealer helps such as novel price tags, 
transcriptions, billboard posters, fold- 
ers, wall charts, handbooks, rotograv- 
ure sheets, a puzzle, a Social Security 
Benefit Chart, talking movies, globes, 
postcards, movie slides, facsimile the- 
atre tickets, door-handle cards and 
logs. 



AUTO RADIO HELPS 

* Three display units have been 
built by RCA to assist dealers with 
effective merchandising of car receiv- 
ers. First is designed for a single 
unit, with a musical background, cast- 
ers and plug-in; second is an es- 
cutcheon kit with a storage space in- 
cluded; third is a 3-unit affair with 
likely lettering and a 3-way switch. 



TRIPLE APPEAL 

■*■ Fada has announced a colorful 
display, No. 200, designed to handle 
three sets and to be used in the win- 
dow, on the floor or as a demonstrator. 
About 50 inches high, it's tinted and 
lighted to set off the new colored re- 
ceivers and is suggested for use out- 
side the main radio dept. Company 
charges a nominal fee. 



NEW DECALOMANIA 

■*■ Neat decalcomania for the job- 
ber's door or window has been issued 
by Clarostat Mfg. Co., 285 N. 6th St., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. Attractive 3-colored 
seal is available to all distributors 
carrying a representative Clarostat 
stock. 



TUBE CARRYING CASE 

* Cardboard bag designed to make 
it easy for the serviceman's customers 
to carry complete sets of tubes to and 
from radio shops has been introduced 
by Arcturus Radio Tube Co., Newark, 
N. J. The case opens like a shopping 
bag, has protective compartments for 
10 tubes, and has an OK appearance. 
Dealer's imprint can be added and 
Arcturus suggests use as a business 
card or mailing piece; the item is 
available at a small fee from the firm's 
jobbers. 



• INDEX • 
TO ADVERTISEMENTS 



Aerovox Corp 60 

Alden Products Co. 5S 

Allied Radio Corp 42 

Amplifier Co. of -\merica 62 

Centralab 30 

Clarostat Mfg. Co., Inc 58 

Clough-Brengle Co 51 

Commercial Credit Co 4 

Continental Carbon, Inc 53 

Cornell-Dubilier Corp 62 

Crosley Radio Corp 31 

Dictograph Products Co.. Inc 23 

Electric Amplifier Corp 52 

Emerson Radio & Phono. Corp... 25 

Fada Radio & Electric Co 5 

Fairbanks, Morse & Co 46 

Frigidaire Div., General Motors.. 43 

Galvin Mfg. Corp Cover IV 

General Electric Co Cover III 

General Industries Co 64 

Hygrade Sylvania Corp 37 

International Resistance Co 41 

Isolantite, Inc 27 

Kato Engineering Co 49 

Ken-Rad Tube & Lamp Corp., Inc. 63 

Muter Co., The 52 

Xational Broadcasting Co. .Cover II 

Xational Union Radio Corp 59 

Ohmite Mfg. Co 42 

Onan & Sons, D. W 63 

Operadio Mtg. Co 60 

Parris-Dunn Corp 56 

Philco Radio & Television Corp. . 6 

Presto Recording Corp 24 

Quam-Nichols Co 61 

Radio & Technical Publishing Co. 61 

Radiobar Co. of America 57 

Radio Corp. ot America 32, 33 

Radio Receptor Co., Inc 62 

Radio Service Institute 51 

Radiotechnic Laboratory, The. ... 47 

Radolek Co 56 

Ra>'theon Production Corp 35 

RCA Mfg. Co., RCA-Victor Div... 2 
Recording Equipment Mtg. Co... 40 

Rider, John F 36 

Silver Corp., McMurdo 5S 

Simplex Radio Co 1 

Solar Mtg. Corp 64 

Sprague Products Co 47 

Supreme Instruments Corp 2S 

Triad Mfg. Co., Inc 47 

Triplett Elec. Instrument Co 49 

Tung-Sol Lamp Works, Inc 53 

Utah Radio Products Co 50 

Ward Leonard Elec. Co 61 

Ward Products Corp 53 

Webster-Chicago 50 

Wedge Mfg. Co 42 

Weston Elec. Instrument Corp... 39 

White Dental Mfg. S. S 40 

Wincharger Corp 3 

Wright-DeCoster, Inc 58 



While every precaution is taken to 
insure accuracy, we cannot guaran- 
tee against the possibility of an oc- 
casional change or omission in the 
preparation of this index. 



January, 1937 



63 




AUTOMATIC CHANGERS 

Will Sell More of Your 

RADIO-PHONOGRAPHS 



Moderate in cost, completely as- 
sembled units, easy and inexpensive 
to install. Silent, smooth - running, 
dependable two - speed motor with 
turntable; instantly adjustable for 
33 1/3 or 78 r.p.m. Newest flat-type, 
flexible, balanced pickup. Simple, ac- 
curate and reliable changer mech- 
anism. Precision-built throughout. 
Compact, efficient, and durable. 

ORDER TEST SAMPLES 

Model "L". shown above, plays and 
changes EIGHT 10-in. or SEVEN 
12-in. records. Model "K" plays and 
changes SEVEN 10-in. records; plays 
12-in. records changed by hand. Or- 
der samples TODAY . . . and be sure 
to specify whether AC or DC, also 
exact voltage and frequency of cur- 
rent you use. 

^^Genemal Industmes CO, 

3738 TAYLOR STREET, ELYRIA, OHIO 

Sample of TRUETONE needles niEE 



yAkf^acitc^ 



WET 

DRY 

PAPER 

MICA 

TRIMMER 






WHEN IN NEED OF 
GOOD CONDENSERS- 
SPECIFY THE BEST 

Literature on ret 

SOLAR MFG. CORP. 

599-601 Broadway 
New York City 



RADIO & TELEVISION 



How television will he introduced 
to American homes, much in the way 
radio hroadcctsting is now brought to 
American listeners, was outlined hy 
David Sarnoff, president RCA, in a 
recent address. He said: 

The benefits which have resulted 
from the industrial sponsorship of 
sound broadcasting indicate that ma- 
jor television programs will come 
from the same source. It requires 
little imagination to see the adver- 
tising opportunities of television. 
Broadcasting an actual likeness of a 
product, the visual demonstration of 
its uses, the added effectiveness of 
sight to sound in carrying messages 
to the human mind — these are only 
a few of the obvious applications of 
television to merchandising. Com- 
mercial announcement can be ex- 
panded through television to include 
demonstration and informational 
services that will be of value to the 
public as well as to the advertiser. 

Broadcasting has won its high 
place in the United States because — 
unlike European listeners — Ameri- 
can set owners receive their broad- 
casting services free. Despite the 
greater cost of television programs i 
believe that owners of television re- 
ceivers in the United States will not 
be required to pay a fee for televi- 
sion programs. That is an aspect of 
the television problem in which the 



advertising fraternity will doubtless 
cooperate in finding the commercial 
solution. 

Whoever the sponsor may be, or 
whatever his interests or purposes, he 
will be under the compulsion to pro- 
vide programs that will bring pleas- 
ure, enlightenment and service to 
the American public. That compul- 
sion operates today and must con- 
tinue to operate if we are to retain 
the American system of radio broad- 
casting. The public through its in- 
alienable right to shut off the receiver 
or to turn the dial to another pro- 
gram, will continue to make the rules. 
In television as in sound broadcast- 
ing the owner of a set will always be 
able to shut it off. In other words 
the ultimate censorship of television, 
as well as of sound broadcasting, 
will remain between the thumb and 
forefinger of the individual American. 

I know of no other great public 
service which enjoys such a wide 
measure of public confidence, even 
public affection. The importance of 
that trusteeship is enlarged with 
every extension of radio facilities. 
Television, facsimile, the vast poten- 
tialities of short-wave transmission 
and ultra-high frequencies — in brief, 
the whole fascinating future of radio 
— will ultimately be yours to use. 
They will represent a new challenge 
and a new responsibility. 




In Germany, television research has been directed toward brighter and brighter 
cathode-ray images, capable of optical re-projection. 



64 



Radio Today 




For the first time in radio history, you can sell auto radio with AUTOMATIC 
FREQUEISCY COISTROL. It's a sales- clinching feature. Your prospects 
will appreciate its safe-driving advantage — eyes concentrated on the road 
— while AFC permits instantaneous tuning for perfect Focused Tone recep- 
tion. This new. sensational G-E Auto Radio offers the most dramatic, demon- 
strahle, sales-getting combination of sales features ever incorporated in auto 
radio. Three proven profit leaders complete the G-E Auto Radio line. 
Ask your G-E Radio Distributor how you can shift your sales and profits 
into "high" with a G-E Auto Radio MERCHANDISING PACKAGE. 
DELIVERIES COMMENCE FEBRUARY 



MODEL FA-60 

6 G-E Metal Tubes, plus syn- 
chronous-type vibrator (8- 
tube performance). 

G 1/2 -inch Speaker, 

Antenna Circiiit-matching 
System. 

4 Watts Output. 



MODEL FA-SO 

AFC Control. 

8 G-E Metal Tubes, plus syn- 
chronous-type vibrator (12 
tube performance). 

6 1/2 -inch Speaker. 

Compensating AVC. 

Antenna Circuit-matching 
System. 

3-point Tone Control. 

7 Watts Output. 

Class "B" Amplification. 



MODEL FA-61 

G G-E Metal Tubes, plus syn- 
chronous-type vibrator (8- 
tube performance). 

6V2-inch Speaker. 

Antenna Circuit-matching 
System. 

Tone Control. 

4 Watts Output. 



GENERAL 

AVTO RADIO 



ELECTRIC 



APPLIANCE AMD MERCHANDISE DEPARTMENT 



GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY. BHIDGEPOHT, CONNECTICUT 




Mctofcia 

WILL BE liELEASiV soon 

VOHTdUy 

UNTIL WU'VEStEMani HEAW IT 




GALVIN MANUFACTURING CORPORATION • CHICAGO 



yearly 



'Auto-Radio 



lusiness 
to You! 



Belongs 



he 1937 Auto- 
Radio Sets 

low to Save on 
Income Tax 

he Right Location 
(or Your Store 

idling Inter- 
communication 

iers' Sales 
lendar 
e Recording 
Luxe 
ing Money 
ut of Parts 

and 
trvicing 



BRUARY 
19 3 7 • 



» 





▲ 



Caldwell-CIcments, Inc., 480 Lexinston Ave., New York, N. Y. 






■P^^Bv 



■■■■ •*^*p9^ ,_.* - 



W9^' .:.., 



J^^7 



»''"3!M*W: .,.-■?' ; 



:e3. 






• m 




1 5 Cents a Cop 



.ti<mi\ 



w-<-^ 



iL ^ 4k 



* T H R E iiSuT O F FO U R 



HAVE MtTAUTO-RADIO ! 




It's a proved fact 

that talking up the finer radio programs helps 

to sell the finer sets! ^^ 




National Broadcasting Company's fine 
programs are a great sales asset 

In the stiff competition for the better type of radio 
set business today, dealers are always searching for 
a new hook-up with the consumer's interest. And 
wise dealers are finding an extremely profitable one 
in NBC's splendid and ■widely-popular programs. 
In the course of every sales talk, there comes an 
interval when everything seems to have been 
covered. Tone, features, finish, price — that's all 
over. And with a sale hanging in the balance, that's 
the time to mention the really fine programs — pro- 
grams with which the prospect is already familiar. 



Programs which come over the famous NBC net- 
works are consistently good — customers know this 
as well as the dealers themselves. Mention of them 
strikes, in countless cases, a subtle yet powerful sales 
keynote which aids materially in the final decision. 

Tell your customers this: "The finest programs 
are no better than their reception — give them the 
best you can possibly afford!" 

The broadcasting system and the interests of the 
15,000 dealers who contact and sell four to five 
million listeners a year are closely bound together. 
Use National Broadcasting Company programs to 
demonstrate receivers, and swing your sales to a 
better type of instrument ! 



r 



RCA presents the Metropolitan Opera every Saturday afterixoon. And "Magic 
Key of RCA" every Sunday 2 to 3 P.M., E.S.T. Both on AJBC Bine y^etivork. 



NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, INC. 

A Radio Corporation of America Service 
NEW YORK • WASHINGTON • CHICAGO • SAN FRANCISCO 



This advertiseuient 

ifill appear in an 

April issue of 

The 

Saturday EvExiNG Post 




IT IS NO SECRET TO THE TRADE 



• For years SIMPLEX has been one 
of the world's largest producers of pri- 
vate brand receivers. Though the entire 
SIMPLEX policy has been changed to 
a protected Distributor plan augmented 
by powerful national advertising, the 
SIMPLEX manufacturing policy 
remains the same: THE MOST 
RADIO PER DOLLAR! 




• With the nationally advertised 
SIMPLEX line you are able to con- 
sistently undersell every other name 
brand on the market. That is the 
SIMPLEX pledge to its distributors 
and dealers. 

Use the telephone, call San- 
dusky 1000 right now for de- 
tails — and reverse the charges. 



SIMPLEX RADIO COMPANY, SANDUSKY, OHIO 

RADIO TODAY, February, 1937, Vol, III, No. 2, published monthly by Caldwell-Clements, Inc, 4S0 Lexington Ave., New Y'ork, N. Y. Subscription 
yearly $1.00 in U. S. and Latin American countries; $1.25 in Canada; $2.00 all other countries; single copy, 15c. Entered as second-class matter July 24, 
1936, at the post office at New Y'ork, N. Y„ under the Act of March 3, 1879, Printed in U. S. A. Copyright 1937 by Caldwell-Clements, Inc. 

Index to advertisements on page 67 




Number 1 

RCA VICTOR'S 
MAGIC VOICE 

The Magic Voice has proved to thousands 
that it has removed the last serious obstacle 
to complete naturalness of music and voice 
in radio. For the Magic Voice ends "boom", 
directs all sound forward through the loud 
speaker.Its completely closed chambercon- 
tains five organ-like pipes which eliminate 
all undesirable tone and which control back 
waves. This results in increase of lo^v fre- 
quency range. The size and position of 
the pipes in the sound chamber were deter- 
mined by mathematical calculation after 
hundreds of laboratory tests. The Magic 
Voice has given radio a completely new 
tonal quality. It extends musical range, 
gives brilliant expression to programs 
found by RCA Victor's Magic Brain, tuned 
by the Magic Eye, made more sensitive by 
RCA Metal Tubes. RCA Victor has spent 
huge sums of money promoting the Magic 
Voice. So remember its qualities, shown 
above. Talk about them — and profit ! 




THESE 24 EXCLUSIVE RCA VICTOR FEATURES ALSO MEAN 
FEWER "FIRST YEAR", NON-PROFIT SERVICINGS 



Magic Voice; Magic Brain; Magic 
Eye; MetalTubes; Worldwide Re- 
ception; Super-Fidelity Speakers; 
Higher Fidelity Tone System; 
Duo-plane Speaker Mountings; 
Tone Compensation; Dynamic 
Expansion; Micro-tone Control; 
Music-Speech Control; Beam 
Power Amplifiers; Antenna Wave 



RCA VICTOR believes the best way 
to sell more radios f aster... lo reap 
richer profit rewards ... is to offer extra 
quahty at moderate cost. 

For this reason, RCA Viaor urges 
dealers to become famihar with its 24 
great features for finer performance. 
Proofs of quality construction, they are 
convincing because they are actuaiy^f/j. 
If you will acquaint yourself with these 
extra RCA Victor qualities . . .show these 
features to your prospects . . . talk fea- 
tures to them— you'll move your RCA 
Victor radios faster, easier and with 
more profitable results. 

This is the first of a series of adver- 
tisements designed to bring you closer 
to RCA Victor's radio features. Each 



Traps; Built- in Antenna Coup- 
lers; Automatic Volume Control; 
Permanent Adjustment; Stabi- 
lized Oscillator Circuit; Rubber 
Floated Chassis and Condensers; 
Selector Dial; Band Spreaders; 
Edge Lighted Dial; Record 
Player Connections; Magnificent 
Cabinets. 



will "spot" a definite feature — tell you 
its advantages, so you may do the 
same when selling direa to a cus- 
tomer. Study this information... keep 
it handy. ..ajf it... to your advantage. 



RCA Victor Console Model 9K-3 . . .with Magic 
Voice, Magic Brain, Magic Eye, Metal Tubes. 
530 to 22,000 kcs. Beam Power Amplification. 
Selector Dial. 9 tubes. $129.95 f.o.b. Camden. 




RCA MANUFACTURING COMPANY, INC., CAMDEN, N.J. 

A Service of the Radio Corporation of America 



Radio Today 



ISTER JOBBER AND DEALER 
HERE'S YOUR OPPORTUNITY! 






^-1*' 



,.^-^v^ 



yv o' 



t 



i,^t«<*\ 



%>8».-» 



Ihe/leuf 

RIB TBP 

GAS-O-LECTRIC 
POWER PLANTS 






f*1lfGHtlNG 






Dealers! Jobbers! Send now for discounts and full details on the new 
RED TOP Sas-O-Lectric Power Plants. This is your own exclusive line . . . 
priced for quick sales and big profits. 



Millions of farms, trailers, industrials and 
others clamor for this economical means of 
charging batteries and producing electricity 
to operate radios, lights, electrical equip- 
ment and appliances, etc. The RED TOP Line 
fills the bill. Here are some of its outstanding 

COMBINATION A. C.-D.C. PLANTS 



features: Combination A. C. and D. C. or 
D. C. only, fuel tank base, light weight, 
portable, lotv-cost operation. Go RED TOP 
in 19371 Our complete merchandising plan, 
sales helps, literature, etc., will help you put 
it over. Mail the coupon immediately for full 
details. 



BAPI05 



In one plant— both llO-votts A. C. 300 watts; and 6. 12. or 32-volts D. C. up to 350 waits, for battery charging 
Generator mounted on engine. Prices from $89.95 up, F. O. B. Chicago. The coupon will bring complete detail 

PIONEER GEN-E-MOTOR CORPORATION 
CHICAGO, ILL 



EHB TOP / 

V IN MOST I 



THE COMPLETE EXCLUSIVE DEALER-JOBBER LINE 
PIONEER GEN-E-MOTOR CORPORATION 

Dept. Na.R.2B 466 West Superior Street, Chicego, Illinois. 

Please send at once information and discounts on RED TOP Gas-O-Lectric Power Plants, 

NAME 

ADDRESS 

CITY 



-STATE. 



TYPE OF BUSINESS- 



February, 1937 



What 1937 Refrigi^S^isi^ill carry an aufhorita- 
tive "Seal of Approval" to^^ure purchasers of 
faster freezing^ uniform shelf ^mperature^ food 
odor prevention and greater ic^-cube capacity? 



What 1937 Rffrigerator scientifically elimi- 
nates all food oHors from its cabinet interior 
and prevents cEntamination due to odor 




on? 



What i^^P^I^STgerator will 
ice-cube capacity of 16 pounds 
even in lowest-priced models? 



^ffer a doubled 
ice (168 cubes) 



What 1937 Refrigerator has the new 
Econo-Phase Vd^um Freezing Unit to increase 
its efficiency, economy and overload capacity? 

What 1937 Refrigerator will have handy shelves 
that can be lifted out for easy cleaning, and for 
use as trays? 

What 1937 Refrigerator will establish new 
style in deluxe cabinet design with one piece 
cabinet and Duo-Seal doors? 




(PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 49) 

Radio Today 



PARRIS-DUNN LAUNCHES 

SENSATIONAL 

^ DUN-CHARGER COOPERATIVE 

MERCHANDISING PLAN 



DEALERS-Buiid Your 
Battery Radio Sales 
With this Amazing New 
Merchandising Plan 

When you tie in witli the powerful 
new merchandising plan of the Sky- 
scraper Dun-Charger, you are assur- 
ing yourself of all the opportunities 
offered by the greatest sales plan ever 
conceived. A plan that actually cre- 
ates radio prospects and gives them a 
check for $2.50 to apply on the pur- 
chase of a farm radio. It then auto- 
matically makes each purchaser a 
salesman for you and Parris - Dunn 
pays their wages. 

REVOLUTIONARY IN DESIGN 

The new DeLuxe Skyscraper Dun- 
Charger with its 10-foot Installation 
in many cases puts the propeller 
above the eddy currents and broken 
wind stream increasing its efficiency 
as much as 30% over low mounted 
chargers. The exclusive Dunn gov- 
erning device controls propeller speed 
perfectly even in violent windstorms 
and the positive elimination of broken 
blades as the propellers tilt back and 
slip the wind. All governing devices 
are kept off the blades so that the 
propeller is light and free to operate 
in the lightest winds. 

HOW THE NEW MERCHANDISING 
PLAN WORKS 

Dealers may order any quantity of 
Dun-Chargers without special order 
blanks at ?15.00 net cash F.O.B. the 
factory. 

Radio Manufacturers cooperating 
with us will coupon their radios. The 
dealer, if he so desires, can use the 
coupon as a premium to give the buy- 



The Higher 
the Tower 
The Greater 
the Power 



DELUXE 

SKYSCRAPER 
DUN-CHARGER 



PHILCO 

APPROVES THE 
SKYSCRAPER 
DUN-CHARGER 




FEATURING UNMATCHED QUALITY IN 



1. Propeller — Dunn's 
stronger and more effi- 
cient. 

2. Speed Control — Dunn's 
positive automatic — pat- 
ented and exclusive. 

3. Generator — Extra 
Heavy Duty Wind-Elec- 
tric, with oi] sealed bear- 
ings. 

4. Collector ring — life- 



time, foolproof. 

5. Turntable — ball bear- 
ing. 

6. Propeller Shut-ofF-pull 
back type making brakes 
unnecessary and obsolete. 

7. Tower — Heavy rein- 
forced steel, double 
height. 

8. Instrument Panel — 
new, completely wired. 



er of his radio the opportunity to 
purchase a Dun-Charger direct from 
our factory for $15.00. 

If charger is delivered by the 
dealer with a 6-volt radio, we sug- 
gest a delivery price from ?17.50 to 
$19.50. An installation charge of 
$5.00 to $15.00 should be made. 

DUN-CHARGER PAYS FARMERS FROM 

$1.00 TO $25.00 FOR BUYING 

YOUR RADIO 

Packed with each Dun-Charger are 
25 special order blanks which the 
purchaser hands to friends and 
neighbors, these blanks entitling the 
holders to buy a Dun-Charger at 
?17.50 F.O.B. factory. For his work, 
Parris-Dunn will mail him a check 
of ?1.00 for every order received 
bearing his name. 

DUNCHARGER PAYS EVERY FARMER 

$2.50 TO APPLY ON PURCHASE'OF 

RADIO. AT YOUR STORE 

Every one who buys a Dun-Charger direct 
from our factory at $17.50 will be given a 
check for $2.50 to be applied on the purchase 
of a new 6-volt radio. This check will be re- 
deemed in cash by Parris-Dunn Corporation 
when accepted and certified by any store sell- 
ing a radio manufactured by a company cou- 
poning and recommending the Dun-Charger. 
A list of these manufacturers will be supplied 
to all holders of the $2.50 checks. 

PARRIS-DUNN MERCHANDISING PLAN 

BACKED BY NATIONAL AND STATE 
FARM PAPER ADVERTISINGn CAMPAIGN 

Every month Nine Million ads are appearing 
in National and State farm papers telling the 
farmer how he can receive a Dun-Charger 
FREE. Dealer helps — folders. letters, new 
leads to prospects in your community and 
local newspaper ads featuring your radio and 
Dun-Charger — are supplied all dealers sell- 
ing one of the radios whose manufacturers 
are cooperating with us on this plan. 

Here is an amazing opportunity to sky- 
rocket your 6-volt farm radio sales with the 
greatest cooperative merchandising plan ever 
devised. Get your display model today and 
take advantage of the peak of the farm radio 
selling season. 



Mail Coupon Today for Details! 



r 




Parris-Dunn Corporation, 

Clarinda. Iowa. 

I think this is a real merchandising plan and I would like to see the radio we are now 

handling packed at factory with Dun-Charger coupon. 

Make of radio handled 

Name City 

County State 

Please send further details on the PARRIS-DUNN Cooperative Merchandising qian. 

I am enclosing for which please send me 

Skyscraper Dun-Charger including high tower, according to your special money back 
guarantee test offer. 

Prices and Merchandising Plan good only in U.S.A. 



I 
I 

-I 



February, 1937 



No one who can afford a new 
radio can ntiss this news: 




The whole power of Philco 
magazine advertising is being concentrated 
on putting that message across! There 
won't be a man or woman in your town 
who has a ten dollar bill — or a couple of 
fives — who won't see it and become a 
red-hot Philco prospect. 

They have all been reading 
about Philco Automatic Tuning . . . hear- 
ing about it from Boake Carter on the air 
and from friends who are already enjoying 
its convenience. 



I Now ... in straight from the 
shoulder advertising with no punches 
pulled . . . Philco is telling them that $10 
down at your store puts Philco Automatic 
Tuning in their homes! 

Will anyone who reads that 
news . . . and no one can possibly miss it 
. . . give the slightest consideration to a 
radio that hasn't radio's greatest conve- 
nience . . . Philco Automatic Tuning? 
There's only one answer to that question 
. . . and vou know the answer! 



PHILCO RADIO & TELEVISION CORPORATION 



Radio Today 



iQZiimi^ 



\i^ClB 32:Sei2 



Darrell Babtee 
Randall R. Irwin 
M. H. Newton 
B. V. Spinetta 
Vinton K. Ulrich 



Lee Robinson 

Sales Manager 



RADIO 
TODAY 



Orestes H. Caldweli; 
Editor 

M. Clements 
Publisher 

Copyright 1937 

Caldwell-Clements, Inc. 

480 Lexinsrton Ave. 

New York. N. Y. 
TcL PLaza 3-1340 



Vol. III. No. 2 



STRIKES, FLOODS, 
SLOW UP RADIO SALES 

* Movement of radio for the first 
six weeks of the new year, fell off 
somewhat, dropping behind the cor- 
responding pace of 12 mouths ago. 
Chief causes were local and sectional, 
resulting from nation's recent major 
economic upsets of strikes and floods. 

Pacific Coast sales went badly off 
for two months pending settlement of 
the shipping strike. Ohio River floods 
put large distributing centers out of 
commission, but replacement stocks 
are now moving briskly. The General 
Motors strike laid a pall on radio in 
many Middle West industrial centers. 

With these emergencies out of the 
way, the background radio picture 
continues bright. 



DUTY WELL DISCHARGED 

* During the time that the Ohio 
river just Ticpt rollin', radio dived 
into the emergency with the greatest 
heroism ever. Described by President 
Roosevelt as "unselfish and praise- 
worthy," radio's rescue feat was also 
the subject of a long salute from 
Aiming S. Prall, FCC chairman. 
Latter bouquet was for consistent 
"reporting conditions, warning resi- 
dents of impending danger, collecting 
funds and serving as a clearing house 
for relief effort." 

With mobile units, radio offered 
priceless aid in directing rescue boats, 
doctors, police, guiding fleets and 
trucks with provisions, cars with 
medicine and serum. RCA instantly 
oft'ered its entire available stock of 
short wave battery sets; auto radios 
were also used in boats with 6-volt 
batteries to receive relief instructions 
from broadcast stations. 

Interesting indeed was the fact 
that in areas where homes were per- 
mitted to use only two electric sock- 
ets, one of these was designated for 
a light, the other for radio. Broad- 



casters ditched their regular sched- 
ules, worked overtime gratis, mouth- 
pieced for police and firemen, staged 
benefit shows. Amateurs were intel- 
ligently active. 

Radio plants in the path of the 
fury were Crosley in Cincinnati and 
Ken-Rad in Owensboro, Ky. Crosley 
lost a small assembly bu'ilding in a 
fire but main plants remained intact, 
will be back to normal when first 
floors are dry and repaired. Work at 
Ken-Rad was interrupted temporarily 
only by loss of railroad service. 



NEW PRICE-LEVEL 
ENCOURAGES TUBE PEOPLE 

* Radio-tube makers and sellers 
bubble with optimism at recent tube- 
price increases. They feel that the 
way is now open for profitable tube 
business all along the line. Dealers 
and servicemen are expected to give 
more attention to tubes as a profit 
item. 

While recent increases averaged 
only 11 per cent, it should be noted 
that on the eleven or so tube types 
wliieh make up 8.5 per cent of the 



business, the price increase has 
averaged 20 per cent. 

Meanwhile to encourage and pro- 
tect tube sales by radio servicemen, 
RCA is experimenting in the Balti- 
more and Washington territories with 
a special brand for servicemen, which 
will be distributed only through serv- 
ice outlets. The "Cunninghana" trade- 
mark, dropped two years ago as a sep- 
arate brand, has been revived for this 
serviceman experiment which, if suc- 
cessful, may be extended to a national 
scale. 



PARADE TO CHICAGO 

* Robust reports from the officials 
of the newljf formed Radio Parts 
Manufacturers National Trade Show, 
Inc., indicate certainly that affair at 
the Stevens Hotel, Chicago, June 10 
to 13, will be nearly twice as im- 
portant as previous events. 

S. N. Shure, big chief of the show 
corporation, speaks of contracts for 
100 booths secured in less than one 
month. Appears that the Exhibition 
Hall will bulge in places, from the 
wild cooperation currently received 
by the sponsors. 




February, 1937 




I 



H. C. Bonfig, who now heads up sales activities for RCA-Victor at Camden. 



ROBIN'S EGG? 



* Be sure that a good section of 
the 61,000,000 females in this country 
tuned in early this month on a big 
fashion broadcast direct from Paris. 
Here was the dramatic reason why 
every woman needs a personal re- 
ceiver constantly at her disposal, if 
she means to have a man. This broad- 
cast revealed advance data on Spring 
style trends within a few hours after 
the Paris openings came to a close, 
and before pictures could appear in 
newspapers. 

Gals knew right off whether blues 
would be robin's egg. ultramarine, 
and whatall. Sara Pennoyer, fashion 
director for Xew York's Bonwit 
Teller, covered the style shows, rushed 
to a mike and blabbed the whole 
thing to U.S. women via CBS. 



INTERFERENCE CAUSES 
SET RETURNS 

* The largest factor in the return 
of radio receivers purchased and then 
returned as "unsatisfactory in opera- 
tion," is caused by electrical inter- 
ference and "manmade static," ac- 
cording to analyses made by Xew 
York department stores. 

Purchasers do not realize that elec- 
trical interference picked up by in- 
adequate antennas, may result in in- 
tolerable listening conditions, and so 
blame the trouble on the radio re- 
ceiver itself. So back the radio goes 
to the store! 

As the use of electrical appliances 
increases, the interference grows 
worse. 

Education and proper antenna in- 




Harry Alter (right), just appointed director of sales of General Household Utilities, 

by William C. Grunow, president. With Harry, at left, are Art Alter and Max 

Geisler, who continue in the Chicago Grunow distributorship. 



stallation seem to offer about the 
only solutions to this return-set 
problem. 



COLORS AND THE BUYING URGE 

* With color now playing a prom- 
inent part in smaller radio cabinets, 
manufacturers are trying to find clues 
to favorite tints. 

Already in the automobile field, it 
is well known that tan has the call 
in the "West, black in the East. In 
toothbrushes, red is most popular in 
the 10-cent line, but has little appeal 
in the 25-cent class, where amber 
leads. For boudoir sets, coral and lilac 
sold out weeks before last Christmas. 
Eountain pens of a certain green are 
best sellers. 

Athletic persons apparently favor 
red colors in general; intellectuals 
prefer blue; egotists like yellow; 
"good fellows" prefer orange. Chil- 
dren and the young want bright tints ; 
older people like dark grays, browns 
and black. 



HOW THEY PAY THEIR BILLS 

* The Bureau of Business Re- 
search of the Detroit Institute of 
Technology has made a survey of 120 
retail establishments, to determine 
the percentages of credit risks of vari- 
ous occupations. As reported by 
Credit World, here are the percent- 
age figures: 

Railroad employees 90.8 

Office clerks 88.2 

Nurses 87.5 

Accountants 85.8 

Teachers 85.2 

Municipal firemen 84.1 

Street railway employees 84.0 

Mail carriers 81.0 

Municipal policemen 80.5 

Skilled male factory help 79.6 

Retail grocers 79.1 

Retail butchers 78.9 

Retail bakers 76.1 

Plumbers 75.2 

Clergymen 74.6 

Retail store salesmen 71.5 

Doctors 69.8 

Dentists 69.5 

Unskilled fema'e factory help 68.8 

Farmers 68.7 

Gas station attendants 67.8 

Unskilled male factory help 65.8 

Bricklayers and masons 65.4 

Drug store employees 65.1 

Auto mechanics 64.0 

Carpenters 60.2 

Domestic servants 55.2 

Hotel help 54.1 

Lawyers 53.9 

Barbers 53.6 

Miscellaneous workers 53.4 

College students 42.4 

Painters and decorators 40.7 

Restaurant help 34.8 

Artists 32.2 

Entertainers 29.3 

Cab drivers 28.8 



Radio Today 




W. Paul Jones, Fairbanks-Morse gm, 
chief speaker at record meeting of 2,500 
F-M dealers at New York last month. 



SETS AVERAGE $55, MIDGETS 
$11, WASH., D. C. 

* Each mouth radio distributors 
in the Washing-ton, D.C., territory re- 
port to the cooperative Electric Insti- 
tute, 10 and E Street, NW, there, 
their sales for the previous month, 
thus giving a very accurate record of 
radio sales in the Washington region. 

Dviring 1936, reports William G. 
Hills, assistant managing director of 
the Institute, 36,698 console radio sets 
were sold at an average retail price 
of $55, and 9,000 midgets at $11 aver- 
age. These 1936 figures revealed a 1.2 
I5er cent decrease in the larger sets, 
and an increase of 30 per cent in 
midget sales, compared with the pre- 
ceding year. 



4-BOSOMED LISTENERS 

* Something has happened to that 
nameless look which the contented 
cow wears in her eyes. The calm of 
the cow-barn has been canceled; radio 
sets are a part of milking equipment 
and the cows have developed formal 
attitudes on broadcast fare. 

At Lancaster, Pa., the thirty cows 
belonging to dairyman Park Miller 
have been radio fans for almost a 
year. "Give !" means Mr. Miller when 
he turns the set on, and if there's a 
hot dance band to be heard, the cows 
give. But in their quiet, chewy way 
they resent symphonies, waltzes, 
speeches and comedy. They regard 
all forms of drama as a pure bore, 
and if there's too much of it, seem 
half inclined to withhold their 
liroduct. 



ASIDE TO GEORGE VI 

* England's new king must face 
the fact that all is not well in Can- 
ada, better known here as the Dionne 
area. Canadians are supposed to buy 
radio licenses when they buy radios, 
but they wink at the license bureaus 
just as we used to wink at the pro- 
hibition officers. There are believed 
to be 1,471,800 families with radios 
and only 829,229 radio licenses ! 

Other less picturesque dope on the 
Canadians: there are 2,408,600 total 
families in the Dominion, and radio 
saturation is now 61.1 per cent as 
compared with 33.9 per cent in 1931. 
Distribution is as follows : 







Total 


Radio 


Province 


Population 


Families 


Families 


Vrince Edward Isle 


91,800 


19,300 


6,100 


Nova Scotia .... 


534,600 


112,300 


50,900 


\ew Brunswick . . . 


425,600 


89,400 


31,300 


Quebec 


3,069,000 


586,500 


280,600 


Ontario 


3,616,000 


835,300 


651,400 


.Manitoba 


741,000 


161,100 


110,800 


Saskatchewan . . . 


979,500 


226,200 


114.900 


Alberta 


777.500 


179,600 


92,100 


British Columbia. 


736.000 


198.900 


133,700 




RADIO DIALS IN BRAILLE, 
FOR BLIND 

* A number of Philco automatic 
tuning models have been sold recently 
with station call-letters printed in 
the raised Braille system for the 
blind. 

Inserted in the station "windows" 
in the tuning dial, the Braille call 
letters are "read" as easily by the 
blind as the customary printed letters 
are read by those who can see. 



R. L. Triplett, who has just completed 
35 years in the manufacture of elec- 
trical instruments. 

Although Braille raised printing is 
not regular equipment, many public 
libraries have Braille printing ap- 
paratus and those institutions will- 
ingly permit their use in printing the 
station tabs required for such radio 
sets. 

"Without automatic tuning and the 
Braille letters, the blind are forced to 
explore the range of the dial sj'stem 
every time a station is tuned and are 
compelled to wait for station an- 
nouncement or for some familiar 
feature to be certain that the proper 
station is tuned in," explains Robert 
Herr, Philco parts manager. 



"^\U^ vt-l -WW 




At center sits C. M. ("Woody") Wilson, new sales manager of General Electric 

Radio. At left is Bill Saunders, who succeeds Wilson, and at right is Al Singer, 

GE district manager, appliance sales. 



February, 1937 



THIS AUTOMOBILE-RADII 

Radio man has increasing opportunity For sales and installation 



* THAT auto radio will be easier 
to sell in 1937 is apparent after a sur- 
vey of the new models. The many 
new and revolutionary features found 
in the new auto sets are a tribute to 
radio's engineering staffs. Today we 
have car receivers with acoustical 
compensation or tone chambers in the 
loudspeaker for better tone. At least 
one manufacturer is using automatic 
frequency control for simple and easy 
timing; another has a push-button 
system of tuning. 

In Eadio Today last month on 
pages 19 and 20, features of the Ar- 
vin, Emerson, General-Electric, ECA- 
Victor, and Zenith sets were described 
and typical models illustrated. 

In the following paragraphs, we re- 
view those sets not covered previous- 
ly. Complete specifications of all auto- 
radio sets appear on page 22. 

Motorola this season again features 
its "magic eliminode" filter system of 
noise reduction. Brand new is the 
"acoustinator," a personal preference 
selector providing control of both 
sensitivity and tone — it provides dis- 
tinct and noise-free reception. Other 
features of the line are : ortho-acous- 
tic speaker housings with adjustable 
tone chamber, jiffy mounting bracket, 
"adapto" broad-range antenna system, 
permanent-magnet speakers, class B 
13 watt output in the Golden Voice 
model. 




Just push the button and there's your 
station with Admiral's Touch-o-matic 
tuning system of selecting 5 stations. 

Noise-free reception is assured in 
Philco's sets which have filter sys- 
tems to eliminate "chassis" spark in- 
terference and reduce antenna 
"spark" interference. Two "tee" bolts 
provide for rapid installation and 
easy removal for servicing. Tone con- 
trol is placed on the instrument panel. 

Trav-Ler's model 601 using octal 
type tubes and beam power stage has 
an output of 4^/4 watts. Higher-fideli- 




Auto owner now has a large choice of antenna types for his car. Dealer is in a 
position to select and quickly install any one meeting with approval. 



ty is provided by a dynamic speaker 
having a curvilinear cone. Humidity- 
proof resistors, condensers, trans- 
former insure trouble-free operation. 
As with other manufacturers, custom 
dash controls are available. Tone con- 
trol is on dash plate. 

American-Bosch's line has 7 models 
— ranging from 5 to 8 tubes. Larger 
models have "double-winged" chassis 
separating the power supply and radio 
elements of set and Gentr-o-matie de- 
sign giving shorter wiring leads and 
less soldered connections, while noise 
traps effectively reduce all interfer- 
ence. 

Robot-controlled synchro-tuning is 
the key of Delco's popular appeal. It 
]ivovides a low internal noise level and 
automatically synchronizes the radio 
with the antenna. Metal and octal- 
glass tubes are used — the new beam 
power output type is utilized for 
greater power. Motor noise eliminator 
does away with the need of suppres- 
sors. Custom controls are made for 
all cars — and an instrument panel 
type speaker is available for the 1937 
Biiicks and Oldsmobiles. 

Push-button tuning 

Touch-O-Matic tuning is but one 
of Admiral's contributions to 1937 
auto radio. Tuning the various sta- 
tions is as quick and simple as switch- 
ing an electric light — the control fits 
on the steering column and is illus- 
trated on this page. The four Ad- 
miral models can be adapted to op- 
erate with touch-o-matic. Other fea- 
tures are: low noise to signal ratio 
provided by efficient filtering and an- 
tenna matching, variable tone con- 
trol, permo-dynamic speaker, single 
hole mounting. 

The Grunow models have the octal- 
glass type tubes interchangeable with 
metal. An exclusive Hi-Lo compensa- 
tion assures a full-rounded, natural 
tone. Custom controls are provided 
for all cars. 

Economy plus performance is fea- 
tured in the DeWald Motortone which 
is mounted just below and behind the 
instrument panel. Direct controls 
give a substantial savings without im- 
pairing efficiency. Set can be installed 
in practically every make of car with 
but little effort. 

I\!aradio is the exceedingly descrip- 
tive name used by the Minneapolis 



10 



Radio Today 



USINESS BELONGS TO YOU 



New developments in sets and controls 



illustrated on the preceding page; 
manufacturer of that name. Receivers 
are housed in round units. Tone con- 
trol and sensitivity switch are some 
of the features. Custom dash control 
for all cars. Included in the line is 
a special set designed for police de- 
partment use. 

Special Ford and General Motors 
models are in Fada's line for 1937. A 
power output of 3 watts is available 
and a tone control adapts quality to 
suit owner. Internal and external 
speakers insure maximum flexibility. 

Generally speaking this year's auto 
radios have a low noise level and re- 




Belmont's Model 667, using 6 metal 
and octal glass type tubes. 




Local-distance and tone control are 
used in the new Wells-Gardner set. 




quire no spark plug suppressors. An- 
tenna matching systems are used 
which will permit the utilization of 
practically any type of aerial. 

And new improved types of an- 
tennas give a better signal pick-up 
and reduce motor noise. This year 
some half-dozen or more antenna 
types are being used — insulated run- 
ning boards on factory installations, 
internal roof wires on fabric-top cars. 
Several of the external types are 
illustrated on the preceding page; 
they include the fish-pole, the topper, 
the streamline roof, and the under- 
car. All are designed for rapid in- 
stallation. 

On a following page are tabulated 
the specifications of close to one hun- 
dred auto radio models. A comparison 
with last years models shows higher 
power output and lower battery drain. 
The cold-cathode gaseous rectifier tube 
has increased the eiBciency of power 
supplies and the beam power output 
tube gives greater power to the sets. 

A study of the specifications shows 
that custom controls are available 
with most models, that single and 2- 
hole mountings are almost universally 
employed. Permanent magnet speak- 
ers have been utilized in the more ex- 
pensive models. 

A recent letter from an exec of a 
large auto radio company states that 
the percentage of auto radios installed 
by factories as initial equipment is 
relatively low, the majority being 
done by radio (and automobile) deal- 
ers. This certainly indicates that the 
radio dealer is the leading factor in 
the auto radio business. 

To the radio dealer and serviceman 
— '"This auto radio business is yours."' 



4,565,000 AUTOS 



Six models comprise Philco Transi- 
tone's 1937 line of auto radios. 



* Figures reported by the Auto- 
mobile Manufacturers Association 
show that 4,565,000 cars and trucks 
were produced last year, an increase 
of 11 per cent over the preceding 
year, but not equalling the banner 
outputs of 1928 and 1929. With ac- 
cessories, tires, etc., the total auto- 
motive business is given a wholesale 
value of over three-and-one-half bil- 
lion dollars. 

The automobile industry bought 72 
per cent of all plate glass produced, 
35 per cent of all lead, 17 per cent of 
all copper, and 22 per cent of all steel. 




Golden Voice model by Motorola, 

pioneer auto-radio company, features 

13 w/atts output. 




rS^^l- 



Beam power-output tubes give this de 
luxe Delco a tremendous volume. 




De-Wald's Motortone fits neatly below 
and under the instrument panel. 




High-power output, classy looks are 
but two of Trav-Ler's features. 



February, 1937 



11 



THIS AUTOMOBILE -RADliuSINESS BELONGS TO YOU 



Radio man 



has increasing opportunity for sales and installation 



• TUAT auto radio will be easier 
to sell in 1937 is apparent after a sur- 
vey of the new models. The many 
new and revolutionary features found 
in the new auto sets are a tribute to 
radio's engineering staffs. Today we 
have ear rceeivere with acoustical 
compensation or tone chambers in the 
loudspeaker for better tone. At least 
one manufacturer is using automatic 
frequency control for simple and easy 
tuning; "another has a push-button 
system of tuning. 

In liADio Today last month on 
pages 19 and 20, features of the Ar- 
vin, Emerson, General-Eleetric, RCA- 
Victor, and Zenith sets were described 
and typical models illustrated. 

In the following paragraphs, we re- 
view those sets not covered previous- 
ly. Complete specifications of all auto- 
radio sets appear on page 22. 

Motorola this season again features 
its "magic eliminode" filter system of 
noise reduction. Brand new is the 
"acoustinator," a personal prcferenee 
selector providing control of both 
sensitivity and tone — it provides dis- 
tinct and noise-free reception. Other 
features of the line are: ortho-acous- 
tic speaker housings with adjustable 
tone chamber, jiffy mounting bracket, 
"adapto" broad-range anteiuui system, 
permanent-magnet speakers, class B 
13 watt output in the Gohlen Voice 
model. 




Just push the button and there's your 
station with Admiral's Touch-o-matic 
tuning system of selecting 5 stations. 

Xoise-free reception is assured in 
Philco's sets which liave filter sys- 
tems to eliminate "chassis" spark in- 
terference and reduce antenna 
"spark" interference. Two "tee" bolts 
provide for rapid installation and 
easy removal for servicing. Tone con- 
trol is placed on the instrument panel. 

Trav-Lei-'s model GOl using octal 
type tubes and beam power stage has 
Ltn uiiliml uF 4'.', wiitts. Higher-fideli- 




Auto ownernow has a large choice of antenna types for his car. Dealer is in ; 
pos.t.on to select and quickly install any one meeting with approval. 



ty is provided by a dynamic speaker 
Imving a curvilinear cone. Humidity- 
proof resistors, condensers, trans- 
former insure trouble-free operation. 
As with otber manufacturers, custom 
iliisli controls are available. Tone con- 
trol is on dash plate. 

American-Bosch's line has 7 models 
— ranging from 5 to 8 tubes. Larger 
models have "double-winged" chassis 
separating the power supply and radio 
elements of set and Centr-o-matic de- 
sign giving shorter wiring leads and 
less soldered connections, while noise 
traps effectively reduce all interfer- 
ence. 

Robot-controlled synchro-tuning is 
the key of Delco's popular appeal. It 
lirovides a low internal noise level and 
automatically synchronizes the radio 
with the antenna. Metal and octal- 
glass tubes are used — the new beam 
power output type is utilized for 
grreater power. Motor noise eliminator 
does away with the need of suppres- 
sors. Custom controls are made for 
all ears — and an instrument panel 
type speaker is available for the 1937 
Buicks and Oldsmobiles. 

Push-button tuning 

Touch-0-Matic tuning is but one 
of Admiral's contributions to 1937 
auto radio. Tuning the various sta- 
tions is as quick and simple as switcli- 
iiig an electric light — the control fits 
on the steering column and is illus- 
trated on this page. The four Ad- 
miral models can be adapted to op- 
crate with touch-o-matic. Other fea- 
tures are: low noise to signal ratio 
Iirovided by efficient filtering and an- 
tenna matching, variable tone con- 
trol, permo-dynamic speaker, single 
hole mounting. ^ 

The Grunow models have the octal- 
glass type tubes interchangeable witb 
metal. An exclusive Hi-Lo compensa- 
tion assures a full-rounded, natural 
tone. Custom controls are providea 
for all cars. . ^ 

Economy plus performance is «»" 
tui-ed in the DeWald Motortone wmc" 
is mounted just below and behind tie 
instrument panel. Direct controls 
Kive a substantial savings without! 
pairing efBcieney. Set can be instaiie^ 
ill practically every make of car w 
but little effort. ■_. 

Karadio is the exceedingly descr p 
tive name used by the Miuneapoi" 



10 



I 



New developments in sets and controls 



illustrated on the preceding page; 
manufacturer of that name. Receivers 
are boused in round units. Tone con- 
trol and sensitivity switch are some 
of the features. Custom dash control 
for all ears. Included in the line is 
a special set designed for police de- 
partment use. 

Special Ford and General Motors 
models are in Fada's line for 1937. A 
power output of 3 watts is available 
and a tone control adapts quality to 
suit owner. Internal and external 
speakers insure maximum flexibility. 

Generally speaking this year's auto 
radios have a low noise level and re- 




Local-distance and tone control are 
used in the new Wells-Gardner set. 




\ne°s''l9,5TP"''r ^''"" Transi- 
lones 1937 hnc of auto radios. 



quire no spark plug suppressors. An- 
tenna matching systems are used 
which will permit the utilization of 
practically any type of aerial. 

And new improved types of an- 
tennas give a better signal pick-up 
and reduce motor noise. This year 
some half-dozen or more antenna 
types are being used — insulated run- 
ning boards on factory installations, 
internal roof wires on fabric-top cars. 
Several of the external types are 
illustrated on the preceding page; 
they include the fish-pole, the topper, 
the streamline roof, and the under- 
car. All are designed for rapid in- 
stallation. 

On a following page are tabulated 
the specifications of close to one hun- 
dred auto radio models. A comparison 
with last year's models shows higher 
power output and lower battery drain. 
The cold-cathode gaseous rectifier tube 
has increased the efficiency of power 
supplies and the beam power output 
tube gives greater power to the sets. 

A study of the specifications shows 
that custom controls are available 
with most models, that single and 2- 
hole mountings are almost universally 
employed. Permanent magnet speak- 
ers have been utilized in the more ex- 
pensive models. 

A recent letter from an exec of a 
large auto radio compan.y states that 
the percentage of auto radios installed 
by factories as initial equipment is 
relatively low, the majority being 
done by radio (and automobile) deal- 
ers. This certainly indicates that the 
radio dealer is the leading factor in 
the auto radio business. 

To the radio dealer and serviceman 
— ''This auto radio business is yours." 

4,565,000 AUTOS 

* Figures reported by the Auto- 
mobile Manufacturers Association 
show that 4,665,000 cars and trucks 
were produced last year, an increase 
of 11 per cent over the preceding 
year, but not equalling the banner 
outputs of 1928 and 1929. With ac- 
cessories, tires, etc., the total auto- 
motive business is given a wholesale 
value of over three-and-one-half bil- 
lion dollars. 

The automobile industi-y bought 72 
per cent of all plate glass produced, 
35 per cent of all lead, 17 per cent of 
all copper, and 22 per cent of all steel. 




Golden Voice model by Motorola, 

pioneer auto-radio company, features 

13 watts output 




Beam power-output tubes give this dc 
luxe Delco a tremendous volume. 




De-Wald's Motortone fits neatly below 
and under the instrument panel. 




Radio Today I February, 1937 



High-power output, classy looks are 
but two of Trav-Ler's features. 

11 



HOW TO SAVE ON INCOME TAX 

Suggestions For radio men, when making out returns due March 15. 
Deductions for expenses, capital losses, taxes, depreciation 



• BEFOEE March ISth, the radio 
man, like everybody else in business, 
must make out and file bis Federal 
income-tax report. 

By careful attention to well ac- 
cepted principles in making out sucb 
tax report, the radio man can usually 
effect considerable tax savings. Sucb 
savings are entirely proper, since the 
principle is now well established that 
a tax-payer may so arrange his busi- 
ness or execute his transactions as to 
result in the lowest possible tax. The 
mere nurpose of avoiding taxation is 
regarded as entirely proper and is 
recognized by the courts as the normal 
course for a tax-payer to follow. 

Charge off 

For example, against net profits 
earned, the radio man may charge off 
as deductions certain expenses and 
allowances, as listed in the accom- 
panying chart: 

On his automobile, whether used 
for business or pleasure, the radio 
man may deduct allowances for 
amounts paid during the year for Fed- 
eral and State gasoline taxes, for 
license fees, for interest on money 
borrowed in purchasing the car, and 
for loss and damages (not compen- 
sated by insurance) due to casualty, 
fire or theft. 

On an automobile used wholly for 
business, the dealer can deduct allow- 
ances for : 



Chauffeur's salary Insurance 
Depreciation Gas and Oil 

Garage rent Eepairs 

Loss on sale of car. 
If a ear is used only partly for 
business, then the deductions are al- 
lowable only in the ratio that the 
automobile is so used. 

On the average car, he may charge 
off "depreciation" at 25 per cent per 
year; on trucks costing under $1,000, 
3.3 1/3 per cent ; on trucks $1,000 to 
$1,500, 25 per cent. Costlier trucks 
take lower rates of depreciation. 

Not deductible are accident dam- 
ages from operation of pleasure car, 
cost of new car, expense of defending 
damage suit, expense of travel be- 
tween home and business, fines for 
trafiic-law violations, or losses on au- 
tomobile trade-ins. 

Equipment depreciation 

On office and store equipment the 

following depreciation rates are allow- 
able: 

Adding machines 10% 

Addressographs 10 

Awnings 20 

Billing machines 12% 

Book cases 5 

Cabinets, office 6 2/3 

Desks 6 2/3 
Dictaphones, Dictagraphs 16 2/3 

Display cases 5 

Fans, electric 10 

Typewriters 16 2/3 



YOU MAY DEDUCT THESE EXPENSES— 


When making out 


your income-tax return 


Accounting Fees 


Losses 


Advertising 


Moving to new premises 


Automobile upkeep, used In business 


Night watch service 


Bad debts 


Painting 


Business expenses 


Picnics, dances, entertainment for employees 


Chamber of Commerce dues 


Porter and janitor service 


Contributions 


Postage 


Conventions, business, expenses of attending 


ProFessional journals 


Delivery service 


ReFuse removal 


Depreciation, business property 


Rent, business property 


Depreciation, on Furniture and Fixtures 


Repairs to business property 


Dues, proFessional societies 


Salaries, business, (excluding own salary iF individ- 


Efficiency engineers, to reduce business costs 


ual proprietorship) 


Employee's bond premiums 


Sample room, hotel 


Employees, fees For obtaining 


Selling commissions 


Entertaining customers 


Stationery — letterheads, bills, envelopes, etc. 


Income-tax returns, business, cost oF preparing 


Supplies — wrapping paper, twine, signs, tags 


Injuries to employees, not insured 


Taxes 


Interest 


Telephone 


Labor union dues 


Theft losses, not insured 


License Fees 
Light 


Traveling expenses, business trips 



Servicing instruments and equip- 
ment having a high rate of technical 
obsolescence would seem to deserve a 
depreciation rate of 25 per cent to 33 
per cent, along with other radio ap- 
paratus. Tube testers and other ser- 
vice apparatus may be charged off 
completely as current operating ex- 
penses. 

Tax payments, capital losses 

Federal income taxes are not de- 
ductible from Federal or state income 
tax returns ; however, state income 
taxes are deductible from Federal in- 
come tax returns. 

The employer's share of "old-age 
benefit" and unemployment insurance 
taxes are deductible. The employee's 
share of the old-age benefit tax is not 
deductible from the employee's per- 
sonal income-tax return. 

The following taxes are deductible : 
tax on dues, stamp taxes, automobile 
license fees, gasoline taxes, import 
taxes, personal property taxes, real 
estate taxes, taxes on telegrams, tele- 
phone and radio messages, etc. 

When the radio merchant or ser- 
viceman has sustained capital losses 
not compensated by insurance or 
other return, he may deduct the fol- 
lowing : 

Automobile damage from icy pave- 
ment or freezing motor 

Automobile sale at a loss (business 
car) 

Experiments, unsuccessful 

Fire 

Patent infringement, judgment paid 

Sale of business property 

Storm 

Theft 

Transactions entered into for profit, 
outside of regular business 

Worthless securities. 

Inventories and reserves 

Under the recent enactments de- 
signed to prevent taking advantage of 
excessive losses, only $2,000 allowance 
on capital losses is permitted in any 
year. In order to avoid this limita- 
(Continued on page 42) 

'This article has been prepared by 
RADIO TODAY based on information 
supplied by its tax expert, C. A. Peter- 
sen. 55 W. 42nd .St., New York City. 



12 



Radio Today 



■'T^'* ■ -.i«iSP<*W" -"-i "<"*:"• .'t-l 




WEEK OF SALES 



-^ 




MONDAY the clearly classic voice o£ Margaret Speaks on NBC's 
Red Network is a part of the dealer's radio merchandise. 



THURSDAY radio salesmen have a date with Jeanette Nolan 
via the commanding CBS feature, The March of Time. 




^ ^^^"^ *^''* Lucille Manners, soprano plus on NBC's 
TUESDAY the snappy star Martha Raye adds plenty to sales in- Red Net, is actually mixed up in modern radio shopping, 

terest as a hot section of Al Jolson's broadcast on CBS. 



A 
A 



*% 




I \ 



■4 1,- 



^••* 




WEDNESDAY the choice singing of Gladys Swarthout on NBC's SATURDAY the radio store is conscious of the attractive 
Red Net is a real reason for extra servicing and sales. vocal work of Benay Venuta, starring on Mutual's web. 



February, 1937 



13 



GETTING THE RIGHT STORE LOCATION 

Shopping traffic — business center — neighborhood selling. 
Problems oF store appearance and store-Front modernization. 



* NOTHING is more important 
than the correct location of the store, 
if the merchant is to depend upon 
shopping traffic to keep his business 
in the public eye and to bring in cus- 
tomers. Especially is this true as 
radio becomes more and more a staple 
article of merchandise. The radio 
dealer must put his store where the 
largest number of potential customers 
will see it — and come in ! 

Selecting the right site for a radio 
store involves the balance of a num- 
ber of factors. Street traffic is de- 
sirable, but it must be shopping traf- 
fic — buying traffic ! Merely locating 
the store on an automobile artery, 
with cars whizzing by outside at 30 
miles an hour, may mean little for 
store business, unless a striking store- 
front is arranged, which attracts at- 
tention and fixes this location in the 
motoring public's mind as "the place 
to buy radios." Parking facilities 
become a problem in connection with 
such a store — but so they do with any 
store today. 

Traffic congestion is the reason 
that many radio dealers prefer to lo- 
cate on the edge of the central shop- 
ping district, rather than right in the 



center of the high-rent territory. Xot 
only is overhead less, with reduced 
ground-rents, but opportunities for 
parking are better. Also there is a 
psychological advantage in being ''out 
of the high-rent district," in the 
minds of thrifty buyers. Certain 
classes of customers, like farmers, 
will walk blocks to save a few cents. 
Other groups want to buy handily 
without going out of their way. With 
radio having drifted into a price- 
comparison situation, and with cus- 
tomers looking for price advantages 
on sets already selected in their own 
minds, bargain-hunting customers 
can be depended on to seek out the 
store. 

Women buyers 

It is an old maxim among depart- 
ment-store owners that no single de- 
partment store can succeed in an 
isolated position. But if two other 
stores also move into the neighbor- 
hood of the first store, making three 
stores for women to visit and com- 
pare goods and prices, then all three 
can do a successful business. 

More and more women are visiting 
radio stores and making their own 




SIDEWALK TRAFFIC is the measure of a store's location. But it must be 

shopping traffic, buying traffic. And, automobile congestion may detract from, 

rather than add to, the radio store's seUing power. 



selection of sets. Of course, radio 
receivers are still bought mostly by 
the male of the household — with or 
without the woman being present. 
Yet the unmistakable drift is to put 
the woman in the seat of "primary 
purchaser." Cabinet design, color 
novelties, all increase appeal to fem- 
inine tastes. As this tendency pro- 
ceeds, radio dealers must consider 
feminine desires and whims. This 
applies even to store location, for the 
shady side of a shopping street 're 
usually the side preferred by women, 
and that side may command a differ- 
ential of 25 per cent higher rentals. 
Certain chain stores locate as near 
to department stores as possible "in 
order to obtain trade from the womln 
pouring into the department stores. 
Some chains have made a practice 
of putting traffic checkers — men with 
counters — into city streets, to count 
pedestrians passing store sites under 
consideration. This method of count- 
ing traffic is significant only, of 
course, if the investigator takes into 
consideration the character and per- 
sonalities of the people passing. Some 
ingenious photographic methods have 
also been developed for this purpose, 
with snapshots taken at regular inter- 
vals during the shopping day. Such 
graphic counts show both the number 
and character of the passers-by, and 
so give a more dependable basis on 
which to judge the value of a store 
site. 

Neighborhood stores 

Xeighborhoods are constantly 
changing. Shopping areas shift with 
the vagaries of taste and demand — a 
warning to the radio merchant against 
too-long leases. Natural barriers, 
such as hills and rivers, restrict the 
movement of population and of buy- 
ing, or may cause new centers to 
break out far from the old-established 
shopping districts. In general, pop- 
ulations grow up hill. They also move 
out along principal automobile-traffic 
routes. 

Because radios are home devices, 
there are inherent advantages in keep- 
ing the radio store as close as pos- 
sible to the local public it is designed 
to serve. For this reason neighbor- 



14 



Radio Today 



hood radio stores have proven reason- 
ably successful when operated by the 
owner and one or two employees. For 
such a store, a location in the local 
neighborhood shopping center may be 
desirable. It may be either on the 
main shopping street — or a side street 
with a big sign calling attention to 
its presence. 

For so remarkable is the publicity 
power of the word "radio" and so in- 
timate is it to the lives of most people 
today, that the location of the ne"igh- 
borhood "radio shop" becomes fixed 
in the memories of the neighborhood 
public. Physical location may be less 
important in the plans of the neigh- 
borhood radio shop, therefore — par- 
ticularly if the radio man uses other 
means of advertising, telephone calls. 
and publicity to call attention to his 
presence. 

Creative selling 

It is this attitude of "ci-eative sell- 
ing" which is becoming increasingly 
important for the radio man. H. C. 
Bonfig. coordinator of sales for RCA 
Manufacturing Co., Camden, N. J., 
expresses this point in a striking way 
in a statement to Radio Today. He 
says: 

"There are probably a good many 
things that our industry maj' well 
look out for in an attempt to show 
improvement. The safeguarding of 
profits for manufacturer, distribu- 
tor and dealer alike should probably 
occupy a prominent part of our 
thinking. Prior to this, however, 
must come the rendering of good- 
will building service for the con- 
sumer. The radio industry has been 
fortunately blessed in having en- 
joyed a steady and ever-increasing 
demand for its products from the 
public. We must make sure not to 
forfeit or jeopardize this interest. 
"I believe before long it will be 
necessary for the industry to give 
serioiis consideration to 'creative 
selling,' particularly as unquestion- 
ably our business is today a trade- 
in business. We can learn much 
from other industries who have 
been faced with a similar problem 
and successfully found the answers 
thereto. I am inclined to believe 
that the thinking merchant is 
thirsting for knowledge of how to 
sell radio sets more efiiciently and 
more profitably. The retailer who 
can master the art of creative and 
organized selling should lay a 
foundation for his business which 
cannot be shaken by the ravages of 
hit-or-miss operations and job-lot 
competition." 

Coupled with the question of crea- 
tive selling is the matter of store- 



Second article in the series — 

''How to Make More Profits 
Out of Radio" 

Topics in future issues: 

Financins Expense control 
Advertising Installment sales 
Collections Profit yardsticks 

front modernization for the radio 
shop. For it will not be enough to 
have the radio store properly located, 
unless it also presents a pleasing and, 
preferably, a striking appearance. 

It will probably pay few radio deal- 
ers today to own their retail-store 
sites. Property ownership of this kind 
involves too heavy an investment, and 
it also ties up the retailer's capital in 
a frozen asset which cannot be liqui- 
dated quickly in case of need. For 
these reasons, most retailers will pre- 
fer to rent. 

There are many ways of handling 
the cost of store modernization when 
the dealer is a tenant and his store 
is rented. In some cases when the 
tenant has a long lease, he pays the 
entire cost of the modernization. In 
other cases, the cost is divided be- 
tween the landlord and tenant; still 
in other cases, the landlord pays the 
entire cost without any change in 
the terms of the lease. Also the ten- 
ant will frequently sign a lease call- 
ing for a higher rental, providing the 
landlord performs the necessary mod- 
ernization. 

C. A. Giorgio, manager of the 



Phoenix Radio Company, 409 State 
Street, N,e)y Haven, Conn., whose at- 
tractive store-front is shown on this 
page, had excellent results from a 
change of location and modernization. 
The cost of this new front (including 
materials from the Pittsburgh Plate 
Glass Company) was $775, excluding 
lettering and under-work. 

"However, the cost does not matter 
if it is productive," comments Mr. 
Giorgio. "Our alterations were only 
completed as of October 1st last and 
the results thus far have been very 
gratifying. 

A change that paid 
dividends 

"It might be of interest to know 
that we moved to this location in 
August, 19.33, because the old location, 
which is only seven doors away on the 
same street, was too old a building 
to withstand any such modernization 
which we desired. In 1933 when we 
moved to the present location, we in- 
stalled a new black-glass front and 
altered the new quarters to the tune 
of $1,100 total, which was all charged 
off in the following four months from 
the increased business done through 
the change. This change was only a 
forerunner and a test of what we had 
in mind. The test proved successful 
and then we proceeded. In 1936 we 
enlarged our quarters and built this 
new front which we now have. We 
find that modern fronts and in- 
teriors are a great aid in bringing 
about an increased business." 




STORE-FRONT is as important as store location. A striking example of 
modernizing carried out at New Haven, Conn. Cost $1,100. 



February, 1937 



15 



PROMOTION CALENOAR FOR RAOIO OEAIERS 

Four pairs of merchants fix up a schedule of sales tricks already tried 




A. Brescia. Radio & Music Shop, Bernard B. Walsh, Walsh Radio Oliver F. Klein, OK Radio Service, G. W. Clark, Carlisle Hardware Co., 

Jackson Heights, L. I., N. Y. Service. Cleveland, Ohio Milwaukee, Wis. Springfield, Mass. 



Fefc. 23-28 

23 — If it's imcomfortably cold, ad- 
vertise that you "will send a heated 
car" after those prospects interested 
in store demonstrations. 
24 — Exhibit a pile of sales and ser- 
vice slips, if they can be removed 
from your records. Use the same 
plan that pharmacists do with pre- 
scription slips. 

25 — Pick out the hottest news item of 
the day and invite prospects to an 
evening session at your store to hear 
Boake Carter discuss it through a 
new receiver. 

26 — Tell your sales staff that you'll 
give them a chance, one by one, to 
try out daring ideas in store window 
and interior decoration. 
27 — Stage a "Metropolitan Opera" 
party at your store this p. m. to fea- 
ture the broadcast from New York. 
28— Sunday. 

A4arc/) 7-20 

1 — ^Use a rhyme in your ads: "If 
your radio can't swing, better give 
us a ring." 

2 — Advise the public to "get equipped 
for the baseball broadcast season." 



Put in a window with newspaper 
clippings and pictures of baseball 
training camp activity, against a 
background of portable sets. 
3 — Start circulating a man among 
recent radio buyers as a good-will 
gesture to check on whether "you 
understand fully the operation of the 
set." 

4 — Run an ad asking, "Can your 
radio still take it — can it reproduce 
those high notes, those low notes, 
those blue notes?" 

5 — Listen to a specially good short 
wave program personally and tell your 
prospects about it verbally. 
6 — Put an old set in your window 
marked in various ways with enor- 
mous figures representing upkeep 
costs. Theme is, "Your old set is too 
expensive to keep." 
7 — Sunday. 

8 — Mail a postcard sales talk to 
names picked up from cooking 
schools, fairs, demonstrations, etc. 
9 — Get a list of recently issued mar- 
riage licenses, congratulate the new- 
l.\'weds and follow up with sales ac- 
tivity. 

10 — Get in on the Spring activity in 
used cars. Connect with the ear 
dealers and work a radio into each 
auto sale. , / '' 



11 — Feature testimonials from cus- 
tomers who are using second and 
third sets in their homes. 
12 — Pick from your files the names 
of those using the oldest sets; start 
your servicemen calling on them "just 
in case." 

13 — Start a personal "column" in 
your local newspaper headed "be sure 
to pay enough for your next radio." 
1 4 — Sunday. 

1 5 — For a special display, blow up 
the page of "broadcast beauties" in 
this issue of Eadio Today. 
16 — Play up the broadcast schedules 
announced by the networks for St. 
Patrick's Day. 

17 — St. Patrick's Day. Accent the 
Irish among your prospects. 
18 — Start a campaign on "furniture 
cabinets for $35 to $65." Write on 
your prospect cards the home deco- 
rative scheme used in each house. 

19 — Collect the names of college stu- 
dents who will be at home for Easter 
vacation ; prepare a "personal radio" 
appeal for both men and women. 

20 — Spring begins. Start ballyhoo 
for the Easter (Mar. 28) season; sug- 
gest that people should also "Dress 
up their homes — with a new radio." 




S. C. Smith. Liebman and Company, 
Lebanon, Pa. 



W. B. Butcher, W. B. Butcher Anthony "Doc" Izzo, Paramount Starr Gephart, Hill Radio & Furni- 
Electric, Wapakoneta, Ohio Radio Co., Hoboken, N. J. ture Co.. Niles, Mich. 



16 



Radio Today 




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RADIO TODAY 

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NEW YORK, N.y, 




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Q 1 Year (12 issues) $1.00 [J Send bill 

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Nome . 



TIffe or Oceupofion 



Cempony 
Sfreet 



CIfy 



Sfofe 



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If RADIO TODAY Is to be mailed to yoar home, fill In acldres* here 



Uo stamp needed on this card — it is ready for mailinff. 



z/here is 
only ONE 

U. S. Pats. No. 101,980 and 1,630,028: other pats pendino. 



^ RADIO 



-the DICTOGRAPH! 

• Made and patented by Dictograph. 

• Employs the tonal fork principle. 

• Uses the Acousticon Mystic Ear. 

• Transmits sound by bone conduction. 

WARNING 

The Acoustican Mystic Ear is not an earphone or 
miniature loud speaker. All makeshift arrange- 
ments to imitate Dictograph Silent Radio are not 
only infringements but are dangerous to listeners. 
Genuine Silent Radio is safe. It is obtainable only 
in the Dictograph or from Dictograph licensees. 

Notice is hereby given that all infringement of 
patents,- trademarks, copyrights, etc., covering 
Dictograph Silent Radio and its essential unit, the 
Acousticon Mystic Ear, will be vigorously prose- 
cuted. 

Only Good Things Are Imitated I 

• When you feature the Dictograph Silent Radio, 
you start from scratch. Everyone is a prospect, 
radio-owners as well as non-owners — for this radio 
is absolutely non-competitive compared with all 
the conventional loudspeaking sets on the market. 
The Dictograph Silent Radio puts into your hands 
a brand new sales argument, growing out of its 
ability to make listening either a personal expe- 
rience or a group experience at the turn of a switch. 
Dealers who have appreciated this fact are reaping 
a harvest of sales ; you should be one of them. In- 
cidentally Dictograph Silent Radio is the only prac- 
tical radio for trailers today. 

Get the facts about this astonishing set that is revo- 
lutionizing the radio industry. Learn how it can 
build your income. 

Return the coupon today. 

DICTOGRAPH PRODUCTS CO., INC. 

Executive Offices: 

580 FIFTH AVENUE NEW YORK, N. Y. 





The TuHJna Fork . . . Sirika 
iH Hold »» fo the eoil UWe 
or no soumj is emifled. 



But prass i) against a table 
and the table is put into 
Tesonance— vibrates — 
gives forth a musical note; 
right. 



The Acoustic o n Mystic Ear 
functions on the tonol fork 
principle. Hold it in yoor 
hcnd — hardly a sound. 





But put the Mystic Eor be- 
hind a piltoWf lean your 
head against the pillow — 
and you hearl Remember 
— 60% of that sound is 
heard through bone-con- 
duction, inaudible to 
others even a fewr feet 
ovfoy. 



Dictograph Products Co., Inc., RT-2 
580 Fifth Avenue, Nevtr York 

Please send me further information conceryi- 

ing your Dictograph Silent Radio proposal. 

NAME 

ADDRESS 

CITY STATE 

/ am a retailer D .' / am a wholesaler D 



February, 1937 



17 




Home groups, artists, schools are prospects for quality recorders like Presto's. 

PROFITS FROM RECORDERS 



• CERTAIN FLOURISH in the 
sound recorder business is traceable 
to the appearance of new instruments 
designed to interest those thousands 
of persons and organizations who 
wish to make discs of their own. 

Many radio dealers who haye 
stocked the apparatus discovered a 
surprising number of prospects. 
Groups of interested persons appear 
from unexpected directions, adding a 
fat slice of extra profit to the dealer's 
books. 

Radio men may either sell the in- 
struments themselves at prices rang- 
ing from $129 to $600, or they may 
buy one instrument and make records 
for customers at average charges of 
$1.50 for 6" discs to $5 for 12" ones. 

Recorders themselves have been en- 
gineered to a new point of depend- 
ability and precision. Until recently, 
the sound experts among radio deal- 
ers may have been critical about the 
quality of the average recorder on 
the market, but today the merchan- 
dise is generally regarded as OK. 

New trend is due also to the fact 
that record materials have been 
finally perfected so that they are 
cheaper and 100 per cent capable of 
satisfactory performance. Voices may 
be recorded today with ease and dis- 
patch ; records are played back imme- 
diately with excellent results. 

Dealers report that schools, singers, 
orchestra leaders, music teachers and 



"social lions" are attracted in large 
numbers. Store traffic is crowded 
with the right sort of persons — those 
who are interested in higher-priced 
instruments and are able to buy. 

Home recorders lend themselves 
well to feature advertising and they 
fit neatly into radio demonstrations. 
They can be used as P.A. systems and 
they make sure-fire attractions when 
displayed in windows. Considerable 
interest has been worked up among 
radio fans who wish to record favor- 
ite programs, or to assemble a "mu- 
sical library." These gadgets have the 
curious quality of attracting the seri- 
ous groups of educators who want to 
use the recorders in classrooms, as 
well as the non-serious people who 
want a novelty in their homes for en- 
tertainment purposes. 

Opportunities galore 

One recorder manufacturer reports 
international acceptance among 
schools, ranging from junior high 
schools to the University of Madrid. 
Another firm has received many suc- 
cess stories from dealers who sell to 
home movie fans, professional enter- 
tainers and wealthy homes. 

In some cases, manufacturers offer 
a prompt pressing service to dealers 
who want a number of permanent 
records made from an original. This 
is important when orchestras or 



HOT PROSPECTS FOR MACHINES 

ACTORS, testing the quality and range 
of their voices. 

ADVERTISING AGENCIES, requiring a 
recorded library of clients' programs. 

ANNOUNCERS, interested in self-crit- 
icism. 

ARTIST BUREAUS, preparing to re-play 
auditions. 

AUDITION STUDIOS, circulating sug- 
gested air shows. 

BROADCASTERS, filing programs, ex- 
tending coverage via records, etc. 

CHORAL DIRECTORS, checking har- 
mony effects. 

CHURCHES, using repeat sermons. 

COMMENTATORS, selling themselves 
to stations. 

COMPOSERS, recording when inspired. 

CONSERVATORIES, analyzing voice de- 
velopment. 

COURT ROOMS, replacing court re- 
porters. 

DETECTIVES, secretly recording various 
types of evidence. 

DOCTORS, specializing in throat ail- 
ments, heart diseases, etc. 

JAILS, keeping a record of important 
conversations. 

HOME MOVIE FANS, requiring sound 
accompaniment. 

INSTRUMENTALISTS, checking and com- 
paring performances. 

LANGUAGE INSTRUCTORS, teaching 
accent and inflection, checking de- 
fects. 

LAWYERS, filing statements of legal 
importance. 

LECTURERS, presenting samples to pos- 
sible sponsors. 

MUSIC STUDENTS, recording their 
progress, checking their flaws. 

MUSIC TEACHERS, demonstrating right 
and wrong methods. 

NEWSPAPERS, re-broadcasting their 
commentators at publication time. 

NIGHT CLUBS, recording applause for 
broadcasts later. 

ORCHESTRA LEADERS, checking all in- 
strumental effects. 

PARENTS, desiring a record of their 
children's voices. 

POLICE DEPARTMENTS, recording un- 
expected testimony. 

RADIO ARTISTS, studying microphone 
technique. 

RADIO FANS, collecting favorite radio 
programs. 

RECORD COLLECTORS, compiling a 
series of novelty discs. 

SALES DIRECTORS, re-playing sales 
plans, speeches, outlines. 

SEMINARIES, preserving the remarks 
of church leaders. 

SCHOOLS FOR THE DEAF, requiring 
special sound effects. 

SOCIETY LEADERS, seeking home en- 
tertainment novelties. 

SOLOISTS, checking their performance, 
selling themselves. 

SOUND EFFECT SPECIALISTS, record- 
ing rare effects on the spot. 

STUDIO DIRECTORS, checking program 
effectiveness, changes, etc. 

choral groups make records and ar- 
range for each member to order one. 
Radio men will also discover that 
local clubs want recorders in order 
to record speeches made on special oc- 
casions. This business works in 
neatly for those already in the sound 
market. 

(Continued on page 42) 



18 



Radio Today 




TUBES 

AS 

SALES 

WEDGES 



SHELF OF CONTACTS, each tube representing an "opener" among customers 
who will later buy other radio and electrical merchandise. 




READY TO GO, jobbers' salesmen organize new tricks to DOUBLE CHECK on the dealer's tube stocks so that he has 
aid dealers in selling more tubes as distinct sales wedges. up-to-the-minute stuff, is early on this new selling schedule. 




GOD-AWFUL TRUTH about how fans are themselves 

blundering around with sick receivers is stamped on the 

dealer's mind. 



February, 1937 



SERVICE MEN MOVE into the picture as they pick up the 

new attitude toward tubes now regarded as the perfect 

sales-catchers. 

Photos from RCA talking film produced by AudiVision, Inc. 

19 



MODERN SOUND SELLING 

— ups and downs of public-address installations 

— dealer must know how to handle acoustic problems 



CONTRACTING FOR SOUND 
INSTALLATIONS 

* "Sound equipment is a fertile 
field but there have been many mis- 
leading and unfortunate conditions 
created in this business. The manu- 
facturer, jobber, and dealer have all 
contributed to the existing chaotic 
conditions," declares Sakio Oura of 
International Radio & Sound Service, 
209 Massachusetts Avenue, Boston, 
Mass. 

"The dealer himself, in a large 
measure, is responsible for the condi- 
tions in the industry. He has made 
poor installations, used homemade 
equipment and antique merchandise, 
disregarded the Underwriters' rules 
regarding wiring, and created a false 
impression in the public mind as to 
the value of a sound installation. 

"The sound dealer is and should 
consider himself an electrical con- 
tractor. The electrical contractor 
makes good installations as far as 
wiring and accessibility of controls 
are concerned, but unfortunately has 
very little knowledge of the sound 
equipment or acoustics. The ma- 
jority of sound prospects have to be 
contacted. A very small percentage 
come to your place of business to buy 
sound equipment as a 'packaged arti- 
cle' such as appliances or radio sets. 



"Architects, contractors, amusement 
owners, and all the various places 
where sound equipment is needed 
must be contacted ! It is necessary 
to have constructive advertising and 
an intelligent understanding of the 
business and methods to which equip- 
ment can be employed. 

Must sell prospects 

"It is also essential to have very 
definite labor charges in the installa- 
tion of any job and these should be 
in accord with the charges made by 
other trades installing similar equip- 
ment such as oil burners, commercial 
refrigeration, and motion-picture 
equipment. Another requisite is 
finance but with the manufacturer 
supplying time-payment plans this 
diiBculty has been overcome." 



SOUND TO THE RESCUE 

* W. L. Fuller, Jr., of the Fuller 
Specialty Co., Parkersburg, W. Va., 
reports that his company's sound 
truck played an unusual and import- 
ant part in the flood crisis in that 
area. Fuller truck was used to direct 
traffic and boats during the confu- 
sion. 

"We were instructed," writes Mr. 
Fuller, "by the Sergeant of the State 



DESIGN FOR THE FORE AND AFT SPEAKEflS ON A MODERN SOUND CAR 




FOR A DRIVE among sound prospects, here's a typical Operadio installation. 

20 



Police and the Captain of the City 
Police, as well as the county safety 
ofiicials, to advise persons to leave 
the flooded areas unless they had 
legitimate business there." 

Loudspeakers on the truck broad- 
cast the advice that extra cars in the 
danger zone only added to the con- 
gestion and obstructed relief activity. 

LISTENERS SET 30 DB AS 
INTERFERENCE LIMIT 

* Over his liigh-fidelity broad- 
casting station WQXE, New York 
City, John V. L. Hogan, well-known 
consulting engineer in radio, has been 
conducting a series of tests and dem- 
onstrations to find within what limits 
listeners find tolerable the interfer- 
ence of extraneous sounds or another 
program. Two voices or programs are 
mixed at difiering levels of 10, 20, 30, 
35 and 40 decibels, and listeners are 
asked to report the difference at which 
interference ceases with the primary 
program. 

"Even on speech interference the 
difference in level should be at least 
30 db." comments Mr. Hogan after 
reviewing responses from a recent 
test. "Out of 73 reports, 34 empha- 
sized the fact that the difference 
should be more than 30 db ; 29 said 
that 30 db was satisfactory, or nearly 
so; only 8 selected 25 db as tolerable, 
and only 2 were willing to put up 
with 20 db difference. The few who 
picked low values also spoke of hav- 
ing considerable noise interference, 
which of course accounts for their 
tolerance." 

This seems to break down the for- 
mer superstition that a 20-to-l volt- 
age ratio is interference-free. Mr. 
Hogan will continue the tests over 
WQXE on the first evening of each 
month, during the coming spring. 



556 LOUDSPEAKERS 

* Example of profitable P.A. ac- 
tivity comes from the Eastern Co., 
Alan Steinert's alert RCA jobbing 
organization of Boston, Mass. This 
month the commercial sound section 
of the firm, headed by "D'usty" 
Rhodes, will receive cash payment 
totalling- $15,000 from one of the im- 
portant local hotels, the Parker 
House. 

Final plans call for the installation 
of loudspeakers in each of the 556 
guest rooms of the hotel. Four listen- 
ing channels will be provided, from 
which guests may select their favor- 
ite programs from the four major 
broadcast networks. 



Radio Today 




COMMERCIAL CREDIT COMPANY FINANCING 



GET READY for a big buying year in 
1937, A country that thought it was 
flat on its back is now very much back on 
its feet and going places. 

Well up in the list of intended purchases are 
radios, refrigerators, automatic heaters, 
appliances that promise to be the targets of 
mass-buying on the deferred payment plan. 

With Commercial Credit Company financ- 
ing you can be sure of closing a higher 
proportion of sales. Intensive national ad- 
vertising is telling millions of buyers the ad- 
vantages of Commercial Credit Company's 



liberal terms and low cost. Buyers have 
confidence in the integrity and reliability 
of the time payment plans of this twenty- 
five year old nationally known service. 

Commercial Credit Company service gives 
dealers fullest protection against loss from 
failure to complete payments. An experi- 
enced, smooth working credit investigation 
and collection system, operated through 
178 local offices in principal cities of the 
United States and Canada assures you the 
cream of the business, prompt remittances, 
and freedom to concentrate on your sales. 



COMMERCIAL CREDIT COMPANY 



COMMERCIAL BANKERS 
CONSQLIDATEQ CAPITAL 




HEADQUARTERS: BALTIMORE 
AND SURPLUS $60,000,000 



FINANCING SERVICE FOR MANUFACTURERS, OISTRIHUTGRS AND DEALERS THROUGH 178 OFFICES IN THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA 



February, 1937 



21 



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RADIO TODAY, FEBRUARY, 1937 



















February, 1937 



NOW SELL INTERCOMMUNICATORS 

— new plug-in telephones profitable line for radio dealers 
— ^tube ampltfler equipment logical adjunct to radio service 



* "Packaged commuuieation" is 
a new convenience for the business 
public — a new line for the radio 
dealer. 

It means tliat tlie radio mereliant 
can now offer a plug-in intercommu- 
nicating system ready for attachment 
anywhere. "Just plug in — and talk!'" 

Some of these systems employ an 
interconnecting talking wire between 
the instruments. Others utilize a 
carrier-current principle which uses 
the electric-light wires themselves as 
the transmitting medium. 

In practically all of these systems, 
the persons talking need to speak only 
in an ordinary tone of voice, at a 
distance of several feet from the in- 
strument. The sensitive pick-up re- 
sponds to this sound, which is then 
reproduced by the distant loudspeaker 
in the set at the other end. Thus 
conversations can be carried on with- 
out the inconvenience of handling tel- 
ephone receivers — ^with both parties 
conversing as freely as .if they were 
talking in the same room. 

Some of the s.vsteni^ are designed 
for two-party conversation : others 
are provided with selector switches so 
that any one or more of a number of 
stations can be reached. 

Installed on the desks of principal 
executives, these outfits enable busy 
men to talk with each other or with 
their secretaries. Telephone opera- 
tors use them to announce calls and 
callers. In the offices of doctors and 



LIKELY USERS OF 
INTERCOMMUNICATING SYSTEMS 



Banks 

Dentists 

Depots 

Docks 

Doctors 

Factories 

Farms 

Garages 

Homes 

Hospitals 

Truck Companies 



Nurseries 

Offices 

Police 

Post Offices 

Restaurants 

Radio Fans 

Sanitariums 

Scliools 

Ships 

Stores 

Trailers 



Warehouses 



dentists, for announcing patients they 
have the advantage that the profes- 
sional man does not have to stop to 
pick up a telephone and answer it, 
and then go through the routine of 
cleansing his hands antiseptically be- 
fore returning to his patient. The 
dentist can talk with his outer office 
without leaving his operating chair. 
In banks, tellers can talk with book- 
keepers. In restaurants, counter men 
can give orders to the kitchen. In 
shops and factories, superintendents 
can talk with foremen in various pro- 
duction offices scattered around the 
plant. In movie theatres, the man- 




HANDY SYSTEMS like this Dictograph fit in wherever there's inter-room talk. 

24 



ager can communicate with the op- 
erators in the projection booth, in 
garages, the front office attendant 
can reach men on various floors and 
order customers' ears brought down. 

Even in homes, these handy inter- 
communicating systems have many 
uses. The mistress of the house, from 
her bedroom, can give orders to her 
cook and chauffeur. Sets can be 
moved about, so that later in the day 
other rooms can be contacted. Bridge- 
lilaying mothers have placed inter- 
communicating phones in childrens' 
sleeping rooms so that they might de- 
tect the slightest cry of their infants, 
without leaving the card table. And 
in cases of sudden and chronic ill- 
ness, these convenient loudspeaking 
telephones placed one in the sick room 
and the other downstairs, have en- 
abled the sick person to take part in 
the life of the family, listen to the 
living-room radio, or call for aid. 

Today's list of manufacturers of 
intercommunicating systems is long 
and impressive: 

Allied Radio Corp Chicago 

.A_merican Automatic Electric Sale.s Co.. 
ChicaKO 
American Carrier Call Corp., 

New York City 
Amplifier Co. of America. 

New York City 
Amplion Production Corn,. 

New York Citv 

Bell Sound Systems Columbus, Ohio 

David Bogen Co., Inc. . .New York City 
Columbia Sound Co.... New York City 
Connecticut Telephone and Elec. Co.. 

il^rid^'n. Conn. 

S. H. Couch Co N. Quincy, Mass. 

Dictograph Products Co., 

New York City 

Kd wards Co Bronx. X. Y. 

Electro Acoustic Products Co., 

Fort Wayne, Ind. 
Electronic Sound Labs, Inc., 

Hollywood, Calif. 
Electru.x Sound Systems, 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

Executone New York City 

Federated Purchasers, Inc., 

New York City 
Fox Sound Equipment Corp.. 

Toledo, Ohio 

Fulton Radio Corp New York City 

Gates Radio & Supply Co. .. .Quincy. III. 
Holtzer-Cabot Electric Co., 

Boston, Mass. 
Industrial Amplifying Svstems. 

New York City 
International Business Machine Corp.. 

Ne%v York City 
La Salle Radio Corp. . . .New York Citv 
Laurehk Radio Mfg. Co.. Adrian, Mich. 

Fred M. Link New York City 

Lipman Engineering Co. . Pittsburg, Pa. 
ililes Reproducer Co. . .New York Citv 

Operadio Mfg. Co St. Charles, 111. 

Philco Radio & Television Corp., 

Philadelphia, Pa. — see ohoto p. 4." 

Public-.A.d, Inc Cleveland, Ohio 

Radio .Amplifiers Labs.. New York City 

Radolek Co Chicago 

Radio Receptor Co New York City 

Reml'er Co., Ltd San Francisco 

Segelsound, Inc Gardner, Mass. 

Simplex Radio Co Sandusky, Ohio 

Sound Systems, Inc Cleveland, Ohio 

Stromberg-Carlson Telephone Mfg. Co., 
Rochester, N. Y. 
Transformer Corp. of America, 

New York City 

Turner Co Cedar Rapids. la. 

United Scientific Labs., Inc., 

New York City 
United Sound Engineering Co., 

St. Paul, Minn. 
Universal Microphone Co.. 

Inglewood Calif 

Webster Co Chicago 

Webster Electric Co Racine, Wis. 

Western Sound & Electric Labs., Inc., 

Milwaukee, Wis. 
Wholesale Radio Service Co., Inc. 

New York City 



Radio Today 



MORE MONEY IN PARTS 



* ''THE jobber to dealer-service- 
man branch of the radio parts indus- 
try has grown to liig-business propor- 
tions. It has been variously estimated 
that 1036 saw more than $35,000,000 
worth of parts change hands through 
these channels, and this is probably 
a conservative figure. More than 600 
recognized parts jobbers are catering 
to some 30,000 established dealers and 
servicemen, and to an even greater 
number of part-time servicemen," de- 
clares E. M. Karet, director of sales. 
Wholesale Division, Utah Radio Prod- 
ucts Company. 

"Unfortunately, the majority of 
those engaged in the parts business 
are not making nione.y. It is my pur- 
pose to point out some of the weak- 
nesses of present parts merchandising 
methods and to offer suggestions as 
to how a losing, or bare-living, busi- 
ness may be turned into a real money- 
maker. Because the jobber is the first 
step after the manufacturer in the 
process of distribution we shall con- 
sider his problems first. 



Jobber weaknesses 

"The major detrimental factors in- 
volved in the jobbing of radio parts 
are not many, and may be briefly 
summarized. Every jobber will rec- 
ognize one or more of his own weak- 
nesses in the following list : 

1. Low unit of sale. 

2. High percentage of returns and 
exchanges. 

3. Multiplicity of lines. 

4. High sales expense. 

5. Cut-price competition. 

"A low unit of sale is considered 
by many as a necessary evil in the 
sale of parts. Perhaps so. The fact 
remains, however, that any sound 
business man must view with alarm 
a business which is supposed to oper- 
ate on a wholesale basis, yet in which 
fully half the sales amount to less 
than $5, and a goodly percentage are 
even under $1. Such a business must 
have an unusually high percentage of 
profit and a low percentage of sales 
cost to survive, or the unit of sale 
must be increased. 

"A high percentage of returns is 
ruinous to the profit side of the 
ledger. There is the expense of 
Imndling, the shipping exfjense, the 
customer ill-will, and occasionally the 
loss of the customer entirely, plus the 
fact that a percentage of the jobber's 
capital is always tied up in goods in 
transit. We know of one parts man- 



ufacturer whose return from jobbers 
exceeded 10 per cent of his total job- 
ber shipments one year. It is obvious 
that such returns cut deeply into 
profits. 

Multiple lines 

"Multiplicity of lines as a sound 
merchandising policy is something 
that may be argued both pro and con. 
With rare exceptions all parts job- 
bers operate that way, their reasoning 
being that each parts manufacturer 
through his advertising and other pro- 
motional means has built up a certain 
amount of trade acceptance, of which 
they wish to take advantage. They 
prefer to have exactly what the cus- 
tomer calls for, rather than attempt 
to switch him. 

"Yet the disadvantages of multi- 
plicity ai'e obvious. Dujilicate stocks 
musf lie carried, increasing the invest- 
ment and decreasing the turnover. 
Because no one line is featured, no 
great amount of sales efFort can be 
expended. Because sales are divided, 
no one manufacturer secures a satis- 
factory volume, and in order to bring 
his sales up to what he considers nor- 
mal for the territory, he is forced to 
appoint adrlitioual jobbers in the same 
territory. The result of all this is 
that several jobbers are trying to sell 
the same merchandise to the same 
customers and that situation always 
leads to price cutting and sharp prac- 
tice, the ultimate victim, as usual, 
being the profit sheet. 

"The last two items are to a great 
extent the offspring of the first three, 
and to that extent are automatically 
alleviated when the other conditions 
are corrected. 

Selling up values 

"Xow let us see what method of 
attack is most likely to overcome 
these existing unsatisfactory condi- 
tions. To our way of thinking, the 
answer is both simple and obvious. 
A selling job is indicated, and the 
thing to be sold must be of sufficient 
value to the serviceman and dealer 
that he is more than willing to pay 
the price demanded, the price in this 
case being elimination of the afore- 
mentioned unsound hiisiness practice. 

"We believe, after considerable in- 
vestigation, questioning and cross 
questioning, that the thing that a 
dealer or serviceman wants most of all 
from his jobber is service. Service in 
{Continued on page 42) 




NEW 

Key to volume and profits 
in a tremendous market 



C^mc^cr^m 



3-way and mnltiple 
commnnieation svstem 



MODERN— SPEEDY— EFFICIENT 



EASY to install and easy to operate. 
Direct communication between 2 
points, with model No. 200 and 
between master station and two to six 
outlying stations with model No. 202. 

SELLS TO 

Factories Hotels 

Restaurants Offices 

Shipping Depts. 

Schools Libraries 

Public Buildings 

wherever inter - depart- 
mental or instant conver- 
sation is required 

This revolutionary new device simply 
plugs in, and gives perfect amplified 
sound by merely pressing down on the 
"talk-listen" key ! 

Merchants all over the country have 
sensed the universal value of ELEC- 
TROCALL and are making a clean-up 
by selling it to their patrons in a 
hundred lines of business. 
No installation or service headaches. 
No competition with other so-called 
intramural communication systems. AC 
or DC current, consumption negligible. 
Speeds up office efficiency, keeps 
phone lines open for incoming calls. 

A beautiful MERCHANDISING weapon 

for the modern electrical wholesaler! 

rf rile for all the fads 

UNITED SCIENTIFIC LABS., Inc. 



63 West 14th Street 



Xew York City 




February, 1937 



25 



UNDERSTANDING. AMPLIFIER OPERATION & CIRCUITS 

Discussion of the Factors affecting gain, output, and distortion 




Fig. 1 — Typical amplifier circuit having 
a resistance plate load. 



H 


/ 

OUTPUT SIGNAL 

-f 


INPUT 1 1 J 
SIGNAL 1^4^ 

■• t 





difficulty to a single stage of the set. 
But to find out exactly what part (or 
parts) is the source of trouble re- 
quires a good understanding of the 
tube's function in respect to its as- 
sociated circuits. The aim of this 
article is to point out how an am- 
plifier works — and what are the ef- 
fects of varying the associated volt- 
ages and parts. 

The simplest type of amplifier is 
shown in Fig. 1 — a resistance coupled 
triode. In the discussion it will be 
assumed for simplicity that the tube 
works into a resistance load — prac- 
tically, this assumption may or may 
not be true, but basically the opera- 
tion is the same, even in LP. ampli- 



fiers. 



Amplifier theory 



Fig. 2 — Operating characteristic of a 

tube biased to the mid-point "A" of 

its linear (straight-line) portion. 

* In radio servicing discovery of 
the symptoms or trouble with a re- 
ceiver is often but a small part of 
the job of actually repairing the re- 
ceiver. Real problem is to find out 
exactly what the cause is — fortunately 
the newer types of service equipment 
aid in rapidly tracing down the 
faults. 

With the cathode ray oscilligraph 
it is usually simple to localize the 



In Fig. 2 is shown a characteristic 
curve of an amplifier tube — it is the 
variation in plate current for grid 
voltage changes. As the grid goes 
negative the plate current decreases — 
plate voltage held constant. 

For ordinary operation the tube 
might be biased on the characteristic 
at the point A, which is the mid- 
point of the straight-line character- 
istic B-C. If a signal is applied to 
the grid as indicated by the waveform 
drawn vertically, the plate current of 
the tube will vai-y in a manner as in- 
dicated by the horizontal wave. These 
current variations on the plate load 
resistance cause similarly-shaped volt- 
age variations across the resistance. 
It will be noticed that the part of the 



AVERAGE PLATE CHARACTERISTICS 



1 


4X 
60 

40 




P 
20 


t 




TRIODE AMPLIFIER 

LOAD RESISTANCE = 3900 OHMS 



fummam 
wjKomim 



320 : 400 

E„MAX 



Fig. 5 — Triode amplifier with 250 plate volts and — 50 grid can be operated into 

any value of plate load resistance with varying results. Line X-P-Y represents a 

normal load of 3900 ohms — for class A operation X & Y represent to limits with 

corresponding maximum and minimum instantaneous plate voltages. 




Fig. 3 — Underbiased amplifier opera- 
tion in which the grid is allowed to go 
positive for part of the cycle. 



B 


H^^^^^^H 


Bib 


^^^^^^^^^E '^^1 



Fig. 4 — Overbiased operation gives 

plate current cut-off when the grid 

goes through the negative part of the 

cycle. 

characteristic utilized is straight- 
line or linear — therefore the output is 
not distorted. 

But let's assume that the tube is 
biased to point B as in Fig. 3. The 
part of the characteristic used is still 
straight, but the tube is operated so 
the grid goes positive — this means 
that grid current will flow. While 
the amplifier iuhe itself does not in- 
troduce any distortion — severe dis- 
tortion may be present if the grid 
driving source is incapable of sup- 
pl.ving the power required by the grid 
without distorting. (This example is 
to show that a straight-line amplifier 
characteristic in itself does not always 
mean distortionless output.) Fig. 3 
does show, however, that the output 
is the same as the input voltage. 

Over-biased operation 

Fig. 4 represents a highly biased 
amplifier capable of handling large 
signals before grid current flows. The 



*Based upon a talk given before 
chapter meetings of the New York and 
Mt. Vernon sections of the I.R.S.M. by 
Vinton K. Ulrich, Service Editor of 
Radio Today. 



26 



Radio Today 




INTERNATIONAL RESISTANCE COMPANY 

401 NORTH BROAD STREET, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Factories or Licensees in Canada, England, France. Gerniany, Italy, Denmark and Australia 

^ MAKERS OF RESISTANCE UNITS OF MORE TYPES, IN MORE SHAPES, FOR 

MORE APPLICATIONS THAN ANY OTHER MANUFACTURER IN THE WORLD 



February, 1937 



27 




Fig. 6 — An amplifier can be thouglit of 
as a circuit with the plate impedance 
KP in series with the plate load RL. 

tube is biased to point C — the lower 
end of the straight-line (linear) 
characteristic. While the grid does 
not go positive, this type of operation 
"will produce much distortion. From 
the sketch it is evident that the posi- 
tive signal peaks will be amplified 
linearly, but the negative peak will 
not because of curvature of the char- 
acteristic. Note how the lower half 
of the plate current wave is distorted. 
(In push-pull operation this plate 
current cut-off is compensated for by 
the second tube in the circuit, and low 
distortion usually results.) For a 
single tube amplifier, this type of op- 
eration is very unsuitable. 

Comparing the results of Figs. 3 
and 4 — it is apparent that under- 
biasing may cause distortion on the 
upper half of the cycle when grid 
current flows. Over-biasing will cause 
distortion of the lower part of the 



current wave. With the oscillograph 
the difficulties can be seen upon in- 
spection. Without visual analysis, 
the distortion source can be found by 
a close study of the operating voltages 
and applied signals. 

Plate current characteristics 

While Figs. 2, 3, and 4 are quite 
suitable for explanatory purposes, 
their practicable application is not 
satisfactory. When it is desired to 
design or cheeky upon the operation 
of amplifiers, a complete family of 
characteristics curves is desirable. 
These are shown in Fig. 5 for a triode 
power amplifier. Xote that each curve 
is drawn for a constant grid voltage 
— and the curves represent plate volt- 
age vs. plate current. 

Point P is taken as the normal op- 
erating (or quiescent) point, as meas- 
ured with ordinary volt meters. The 
plate voltage is 2.50. grid — 50. and 
plate current 34 mils — typical opera- 
tion for the type 43 tube. In order 
to find out how the tube operates, it 
is necessary to draw in a load resist- 
ance line. This is represented by 
X-T and is 3900 ohms. (If X-Y is 
extended to intercept the voltage and 
current scales, and the voltage value 
divided b.v the current rahir. a value 
of 3900 will be obtaiued. the desired 
resistance.) While anj' value of re- 
sistance mig'ht have been used, past 
experience shows 3900 to be suitable 
for this particular tube. 

The load line represents the por- 
tion of the tube characteristics that 
are utilized. 

from this drawing the operation 
of the amplifier can be traced. As 
the grid goes less negative the plate 
current will increase and vice versa — 
and the instantaneous plate current 
can be obtained for any grid voltage. 



AVERAGE PLATE CHARACTERISTICS 



IFB I . ECI = 




^^ 








^^^^" 




'°nn 




caa 


< 

3 


T« —J 


^- ^ 






'f 


VOLTAGE AMPLIFICATION 
VS. 
LOAD RESISTANCE 










I- 





Rp= 10000 p=IO 

.1 .2 .3 f 
LOAD RESISTANCE - MEGC 


HMS 


.5 



Fig. 7 — Voltage amplification is depend- 
ent upon the value of plate load resist- 
ance employed — curve given for triode. 




Fig. 9 — With the pentode amplifier the curved portion of the characteristics at the 

left is a source of distortion. A high load resistance provides a greater voltage* 

amplification, but with large grid swings much distortion is present. 



Fig. 8 — Amplification available from 
a typical screen grid tube. 

the current is given at the intersec- 
tion of the grid voltage curve and 
the load line. During the cycle, the 
tube operates along the load line — 
only those values of plate current and 
voltage as indicated by the load line 
are possible. 

Distortion check 

Assuming an input signal with a 
peak equal to the bias voltage, the 
operating limits are prescribed by the 
minimum plate voltage ^min and 
maximum plate voltage Ejjjgx -with 
corresponding maximum and mini- 
mum plate current ^Pmax and IPmin. 
A rough measure of the amount of 
distortion produced in an amplifier 
can be quickly made by measuring 
the lengths of the load line X-P and 
P-T. For distortionless operation 
the two sections shoald be equal — 
but for grid swings such as the one 
we have (0 to 100 volts), the lines 
are not equal. X-P is some 1.5 per 
cent longer tliau the P-T which is 
not a serious difference. A maximum 
variation of 20-22 per cent can usu- 
ally be tolerated. (These percentages 
are not per cent distortion.) 

The choice of operating voltages 
and load resistance are the factors 
affecting the distortion for any par- 
ticular type of tube. Take for in- 
stance, if the bias had been taken as 
60 volts with a .50-volt swing. This 
is done on the diagram by droppitig 
point P to the 60-volt grid line. The 
ooerating points would have been 
limited by the instantaneous grid 
voltages Eff = —10 and —110. The 
variation in length between the new 
X-P and P-T would have been much 
greater. When the bias ^g is about 
— 60 volts, it represents operation 
like that discussed for Fig. 4. 

The heavy dotted line indicates a 
(Contimied on page 55) 



28 



Radio Today 




s^^^"?. 








Leading set manufacturers al- 
ways consider quality as the 
paramount factor when select- 
ing components. The fact that 
Micamold parts are used in 
seven out of eight radio receivers is proof beyond ques- 
tion of doubt that no better nor more dependable con- 
densers and resistors can be found. Quality is just as 
important to the service man as it is to the set manufac- 
turer. Work well done, with dependable replacement 
parts, makes satisfied customers and builds a reputation. 



Micamold manufactures a full line 
of Electrolytic, Paper, Mica and 
Trimmer Condensers and Wire 
Wound and Carbon Resistors. Ask 
your Jobber for them by name. 
Send in the coupon below and get 
our new catalog with list prices. 



The service man can 
take advantage of 
the research facili- 
ties of the best of 
the set manufactur- 
ers by using the same brands of parts that he finds in 
original equipment. 

Micamold products are more conservatively rated. 
Test Micamold dry Electrolytics against any other simi- 
larly rated condensers. The results will convince you. 
Micamold Replacement parts are inexpensive. 




TRADE MARK 





CONDENSERS - RESISTORS 




MICAMOLD 

Name . 


PRODUCTS CORPORATION, Flushing and Porter Avenues, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Please send me your catalog of Replacement Parts. 




Address 




^K"^"-^^l 


City 


. .State 


L^^n 


Jobber's Name... 




^^^^^*i.j 



February, 1937 



29 



NEW THINGS FROM THE MANUFACTURERS 




* 5-tube AC-DC tuned radio fre- 
quency table receiver. Tunes 520-1730 
KC. Power output 1 watt. 8% -inch 
4-color illuminated dial. 5% -inch dy- 
namic speaker. Walnut cabinet with 
speaker at the end. Model 502 — list 
$18.95. Trav-Ler Radio & Television 
Corp., 1036 W. Van Buren St., Chicago, 
111. — Radio Today. — See also advt. 
p. 33. 



Emerson receivers 




* Two new sets have been added 
to the Emerson line. Illustrated is 
the R-153 5-tube AC superhet. Tunes 
540-4000 KC in 2 bands. 6-inch dy- 
namic speaker — power output 3 watts. 
Power line filter and wavetrap. Tone 
control and AVC — Gemloid dial. 
Acoustically constructed cabinet. List 
$26.95. Model R-158 same chassis as 
above but different cabinet — list 
$29.95. Emerson Radio & Phonograph 
Corp., Ill Eighth Ave., New York, 
N. Y. — Radio Todat. 



Zephyr crystal pick-up 




* Phonograph pick-up using crys- 
tal element. Wide range up to 10,000 
cycles. Needle-tilt method reduces 
tracking error to a minimum — im- 
proves reproduction and increases rec- 
ord life. Streamlined in moulded black 
Bak elite. 10%-inch arm — record pres- 
sure of 2 ounces. Model 99A — list $12. 
Shure Brothers, 225 W. Huron St., 
Chicago, 111. — Radio Today. 



Presto recorder 

* Instantaneous recorder for ace- 
tate or aluminum records. Has vol- 
ume indicator meter and crystal mike. 
Complete with 4-stage amplifier and 
loudspeaker. Cast aluminum turn- 
table with heavy rim prevents "wows." 
Light crystal pick-up for play back. 
Compact and portable. Model D. 
Presto Recording Corp., 139 W. 19th 
St., New York City. — Radio Today. — 
See also advt. p. 42. 



Belfone intercommunicator 



Masterpiece receiver 




* Masterpiece V set with full- 
range bass reception. Acoustically de- 
signed and treated cabinet provides 
reproduction from 30-9000 cycles. Back 
of console completely enclosed except 
for ports or openings in the rear which 
utilize the back wave of the speaker. 
Set uses an 18-inch Jensen speaker. 
McMurdo Silver Corp., 2900 S. Michi- 
gan Ave., Chicago, 111. — Radio Today. 

Factory call system 




* Amplifier system designed for 
factory installations. Hexibility of 
equipment adapts equipment for all 
sizes of installations. Simplicity of in- 
stallation obtained by use of permo- 
dynamic speakers — only two wires to 
each speaker. Wall, desk, projector 
type speakers available. Webster Co., 
3825 W. Lake St., Chicago, 111.— Radio 
Today. — See also advt. p. 54. 




* Two-way voice communication 
system. Two-station and master sta- 
tion types available. Master has ro- 
tary type switch selects up to 10 sta- 
tions. Effortless send-receive switch. 
Calibrated volume control for local 
volume. Control on back for adjusing 
volume of outlying stations. Hand- 
rubbed walnut cabinet. Bell Sound 
Systems, Inc., 61 E. Goodale St., Colum- 
bus, Ohio — Radio Today. 



Micromatic pick-up 




* Pick-ups for 12-inch and trans- 
cription records. Flat above 300, ris- 
ing characteristic at low end beginning 
at 300 and gradually increasing to 10 
DB at 70 cycles to compensate for at- 
tenuation in recording. Type AA74 
for 12-inch records — list $55. Type 
AA76 for 18-inch transcriptions — list 
$75. Audak Co., 500 Fifth Ave., New 
York, N. Y. — Radio Today. 



Spell-O-Light sign 




* Plug-in letters to provide any 
message or sign desired. Each unit 
complete in itself with flasher contact. 
Boxes may be arranged horizontally, 
vertically, in scattered groups, or sus- 
pended. Nothing to wear out. Letter 
available in several colors — slide into 
frames of boxes. Heinemann Electric 
Co., Trenton, N. J. — Radio Today. 

Portable recording machine 

* Recording machine for 78 and 
33 1/3 rpm. recordings— cuts 90, 110, 
130-line records in either direction. 



30 



Radio Today 




m wxa 

ALL YOU HAVE TO DO IS ANSWER A QUESTION. YOU 
KNOW THE ANSWER NOW-YOU TELL IT TO A CUSTOMER 
TWO OR THREE TIMES A WEEK. YOUR CHOICE OF EITHER 
$600 CASH OR A NEW V-8 SERVICE TRUCK WITH A 
COMPLETE BUILT-IN SOUND SYSTEM IS THE FIRST PRIZE. 
THERE ARE 500 OTHER PRIZES! 

AS K YOUR JQBBEI^ 

RAYTH [ON 



RmHEON mODUCTION CORPOyilON 



420 Lexington Ave., New York, N. Y. 44S Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, Illinois 
55 Chapel Street, Newton, Mass. 555 Howard Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
415 Peachtree St., N. E., Atlanta, Ga. 
RAYTHEON IS THE MOST COMPLETE LINE - ALL TYPES OF GLASS, OCTAL BASE. METAL, RESISTANCE AND AMATEUR TRANSMITTER TUBES 



February, .1937 



31 



NEW THINGS 



Powered by self-starting synchronous 
motor. 110 AC, 50 or 60-cycle opera- 
tion. 16-inch turntable — separate cut- 
ting and play back heads. Housed in 
two cases — easily set up or packed 
for carrying. Universal Microphone 
Co., Inglewood, Calif. — R.\dio Tod.\y. — 
See also advt. p. 41. » 

Spherical sound cell mike 



Diesel electric plant 




* Non-directional type of micro- 
phone — sound cell construction — high 
output of -60 DB. Size 3 inches diam- 
eter. Type AR4S39— list $75. A com- 
panion type AR2S6P with slightly 
lower output is available — has advan- 
tage of longer leads as a high imped- 
ance mike. Can be supplied with trans- 
former for 50-200 ohm equipment. 
Brush Development Co., E. 40th & 
Perkins Ave., Cleveland, Ohio — Radio 

TOD.W. 

Stanley radio tools 



(^ 



* Complete line of hand drills, 
screw drivers, soldering irons, cold 
chisels, vises for the serviceman. Illus- 
trated is the 1020 flashlight screw 
driver, 668 offset screw driver, special 
177 long-shank radio screw driver. 
No. 177 available in 5% to 11% inch 
overall lengths. 11% size — list $.45. 
Stanley Rule & Level Works, New 
Britain, Conn. — Radio Today. 

Factory-soldered aerials 

* Two aerials designed for use in 
rural sections. Type 45-2428 has a total 
length of 170 feet of which 150 feet is 
2-22 wire and forms flat top and out- 
door lead-in. Fle.\ible lead-in window 
strip and indoor lead-in are soldered 
on. List $2.50. Type 45-2431 has 60 feet 
of 7-strand aerial wire and 30-feet of 
lead-in. List $1.60. All parts are sol- 
dered together for rapid installation 
and elimination of noise produced by 
faulty soldering. Philco Radio & Tele- 
vision Corp., Tioga & C Sts., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. — Radio Today. 




* Line of 2 to 6 kilowatt Diesel 
driven AC or DC generators. Ex- 
tremely low operating cost — consumes 
1 pint fuel per horsepower per hour. 
Will operate continuously with atten- 
tion only to fuel, water cooling sys- 
tem, and lubrication. Separately ex- 
cited generator. Moving parts com- 
pletely enclosed except for flywheel — 
belt connection between engine and 
generator. Kato Engineering Co., 727 
S. Front St., Mankato, Minn. — Radio 
Today. 

Windex antenna 




* Window tjpe antenna which 
fastens to sill Telescopic — extends to 
8 feet. Moulded insulation and lead- 
in strip. Plated to resist rust. Model 
W.I.— list $2.45. Ward Products Corp., 
1523 E. 45th St., Cleveland, Ohio— 
Radio Today. — See also advt. p. 68. 

Burton-Rogers oscilloscope 




* Low-cost oscilloscope using 1- 
inch 913 cathode ray tube. Has ver- 
tical amplifier. Sensitivity with amp. 
1 RMS volts per inch — without amp. 
75 volts per inch. Has 60 cycle sweep 
only. Amplifier range 20-lOOM cycles. 
Input impedance 1 megohm. Model 
60 — net $29.95 complete with tubes. 
Burton-Rogers Co., 755 Boylston St., 
Boston, Mass. — Radio Today. 



Crolite ceramic resistors 

* Pig-tail type resistor with Crolite 
low-loss insulation. Available in 1- 
watt rating — all usual standard values. 
Size %x% inches long. Value of re- 
sistor on each unit. Also recently in- 
troduced are the Crolite electrolytic 
condensers which are self-healing. 
Henry L. Crowley & Co., 1 Central 
Ave., W. Orange, N. J. — Radio Today. 

Low-loss radio parts 

* Line of Isolantite threaded and 
grooved coil forms for high-frequency 
coils. Complete coils and shields also 
available. Other items are low-loss 
sockets, plugs, binding posts, and mis- 
cellaneous parts. Boonton Radio Corp., 
Boonton, N. J. — Radio Today. 

Audio frequency recorder 




* Instrument for automatically re- 
cording the over-all audio frequency 
characteristics of any radio set. Cali- 
brated microphone for sound pick-up — 
or recorder may be connected to any 
portion of audio system. Pen draws 
response on chart calibrated in deci- 
bels vs. cycles. Audi-o-graph has self- 
contained beat frequency oscillator 
and 1000 KC radio frequency oscillator. 
Designed for manufacturers and radio 
labs. Tobe Deutschmann Corp., Canton. 
Mass. — Radio Today. 

Dynamic microphone 




* Directional high-output dynamic 
microphone using Alnico magnets. Pick- 
up characteristics illustrated above. 
Exceptionally rugged construction — 
built-in rubber shock absorbers — blast 
proof. Durable shock-proof housing. 
Rigid tests insure quality and depend- 
ability of device. Type TR-3 — extreme- 
ly high output level of -43 to -45 DB. 
Frequency response with 3DB from 
20-7000 cycles. List $24.50. Trans- 
ducer Corp., 30 Rockefeller Plaza, New 
York, N. Y. — Radio Today. — See also 
advt. p. 67. 

Wrinkle finish varnish 

* Air-drying wrinkle finish varnish 
for radio shields, chassis, and panels. 
Requires no baking — easily applied 
with brush or spray gun. Available 
in black, brown and green. Black Va 
pint — list 35 cents. General Cement 
Mfg. Co., 611 Lincoln Ave., Rockford, 
111. — Radio Today 



32 



Radio Today 



FREE 

A NEW ILLUSTRATED 

BOOK EVERY ONE 

INTERESTED IN 

RADIO SHOULD OWN 




It tells, and shows, how batteries are madej 
how they should be used to best advantage, 
what you should expect from them. It con- 
tains performance curves, charts and helpful 
technical information. Profusely illustrated. 
If you want to be "up" on the latest in battery- 
operated sets, get this book. There's dope in it 
every radio man will want. 

SEND US THE COUPON 
WE'LL SEND YOU THE BOOK 



National Carbon Company, Inc. 
P. O. Box 600, Grand Central Station 
New York, N. Y. 

Please send tne free of charge the new book, "The 
Inside Story of Radio Batteries." 

Name 

Address 



_RT-2 



The NEW 




AUTO RADIO 

. . . Has 5 Features 
You II Especially Like: 




Model 

601 
7 Tubes 



SEE 

TRAV-LER 

DISPLAY 

Automotive 

Accessory 

Show 

Room 661 -A, 
Hotel Stevens, 
Chicago, 
Feb. 13-17. 

Room 440, 
Hotel Edison, 
NewYorkCity 
Feb.28-Mar.5 



1. SUPPRESSORLESS . . . 
Special Trav-ler designed 

high frequency filtering system 
automatically eliminates all mo- 
tor and ignition interference. 

2. GREATER SENSITIVITY 
. . . Under 1 microvolt . . . 

Uses latest type iron core coils. 

3. CUSTOM BUILT PANELS 

. . . For all type 1937, 1936 
and 1935 cars. 

4. ATTRACTIVE HOUSING 
. . . Color is metallic gray 

with chromium plated front 
grille and red lettering. 

5. PLUG-IN SOCKET FOR 
EXTRA SPEAKER . . . 

for easy installation of auxiliary 
overhead or under-dash speaker 
— if desired. 



TR.W-LER MODEL, 001 i.s a newly dcsi^iieil 
7 tuhes siiiierheterodyiie "'ith single hole 
mounting for easy instnllation. The set is 
eqnipiied with six nnd one-hnlf ineh high 
fidelity hejivy duty eurvilinenr speaker . . . 
tliree gang hall bearing rubber iiionnted vari- 
able condenser. Power Output 4.25 "Watts, 
nndistorted. Complete, ready for fi.io O^ 
installation. List Price J^^W.WO 

Something NEW in Home Radio 

... .V new design in cabinet and di:il . . , 
smart . . . pleasing . . . sure to appeal . . . 
This set »yill sell itself in appearance, per- 
formance anil price. List Price.. .^18,95 



5 Tubes A( 
DC TRF 

5?/^" Dynamic l 
Speaker, Tun- 
ing Range 520 b.- 
KC-1730KC. - 

Two gang ball 
bearing vari- 
able condenser. 




Complete line for foreign requirements 



NOTICE TO DEALERS 



Big Money 
MaV.\nq 
Possibilities 
in Trtty-Ser 
Radio. 
Why not 
send coupon 
now? 



TRAV-LER RADIO & TELEVISION CORP'N 
1032 W. Van Buren St., Chicago, 111. 
Cable Address : Travl Chicago 

Without obligation please send me complete catalog 
and details of your dealer plan. 

Name 

Address 



City. 



February, 1937 



33 





m^m»** 



SOUND 
ENGINEERING 

Rising 70 stories above New 
York's sidewalks, the massive 
RCA Building houses the nerve- 
center of RCA's services in com- 
munications . . . broadcasting . . . 
reception— the pyramids of radio. 
Overlooking the towers of mid- 
town Manhattan, this huge struc- 
ture rises 850 feet and has a gross 
area of 2, 192,000 sq.ft. It stands as 
a mighty symbol of radio's advance. 



!^3i 






RADIO CORPORATION 



Broadcasting 
Headquarters ! 



*m!mtmnmmhf.mmimm 




RADIO has made neighbors, good neighbors, of all America 
« — and the world. And the Radio Corporation of America 
is proud to have played an important part in creating this 
widespread spirit of fellowship. RCA has done this through 
the National Broadcasting Company— one of its services — 
whose two network systems, comprising 116 stations, spread 
across the United States from Maine to California — from 
Canada to Texas — across the Pacific to Honolulu. 

Broadcasting Headquarters are located in splendid Radio 
City. Here are NBC's modern, acoustically perfect studios, 
where many of radio's most famous programs originate. Built 
specifically for broadcasting, these 22 studios incorporate the 
latest advances in design, sound-proofing, acoustics and tech- 
nical facilities. They make possible better program transmission, 
assuring better home reception. 

RCA supplies the world with service in every branch, of radio. 
Its varied services have earned unlimited public confidence. 
The world knows the RCA trademark as a magic key to quality 
... so it buys "RCA ALL THE WAY." And dealers who fea- 
ture this organization's products do a more profitable business. 
They know it pays to be associated with Radio's Leader — 
pioneer in the engineering of sound — pioneer that some day 
will give the world radio sight/ 

RCA MANUFACTURING CO., INC. . RCA COMMUNICATIONS, INC. 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING CO. . RCA INSTITUTES, INC. 

RADIOMARINE CORPORATION OF AMERICA 

RCA presents the Metropolitan Opera every Saturday 
afternoon. And "Magic Key of RCA" every Sunday 
2 to ^ P. M., E. S. T. Both on NBC Blue Network. 

OF AMERICA' Radio C/Yy- NEW YORK 

EVERYTHING IN RADIO FOR SERVICE IN COMMUNICATIONS . . . BROADCASTING . . . RECEPTION 



'w;iriBiMv.iJ.i.iJ.in.iJ.iJj,.iJjiJ.i.<Jiij»j 

"ONLY NBC was there!" 

• 

Outstanding broadcasts ofi^^S 
heard only over NBC networks 

From Zeppelin"Hindenburg" 

First broadcast from "S. S. 
Queen Mary" during her 
trial run 

Rose Bowl Football Game, 
1937 

Salzburg Music Festival 

Harvard Tercentenary 

Metropolitan Opera 

Louis-Schmeling Fight 

America's Town Meeting 

Cardinal Hayes at NBC 

Federal Radio Project 
(4 programs) 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

In 1937, "NBC will be there," 
serving the public with a feast 
of outstanding broadcasts. 



Model 


I.F. 


Model 


I. F. 


Chassis 


Peak 


Chassis 


Peals 


DE-WALD* 


ECHOPHONE* 






(Continued) 


Continued from 


72 


115 


January 




75 


115 


RADIO TODAY 


80 


175 


505, 505-F 


456 


81 


175 


505-R 


456 


90 


175 


505-R-L\V 


456 


92 


115 


507 


456 


100 


456 


508 


456 


111 


456 


510. 510-B 


456 


112 


456 


511 


456 


119 


456 


517. 517-R 


456 


124 


456 


520 
522 


456 
456 


126 
128 


456 
456 


523 


456 


130 


456 


525 


456 


133 


175 


526 


456 


139 


456 


550 


456 


139 C 


456 


551 


456 


143 


456 


553, 553-4S 


456 


160 


456 


554-S 


456 


F 


175 


560 


465 


S-5 


175 


570 


465 


125 


456 


580-R 


456 


1734 


456 


600, 600-A 


456 


1734A 


456 


601 
602 


456 
456 


7114 
7124 


456 
456 


603-A 


456 


7127 


456 


603-R 


456 






604 


456 


EDISON-BELL 


605 


175 


43 


175 


606 


175 


44 


175 


607 


456 


45 


175 


608 


175 


53 


175 


609, 609-SA 


456 


53 LW 


115 


610, 610-LW 


456 


55 AW 


456 


610-SA 


45S 


63 


175 


610-SA-LW 


456 


63 LW 


115 


610-SC 


456 


64 


456 


610-SC-LW 


456 


64 LW 


115 


611, 611-LW 


456 


66 AW 


456 


611-SA 


456 






611-SA-LW 


456 


ELECTRIC 


612. 612-LW 
612-SA 


456 
456 


AUTO-LITE 


612-SA-LW 


456 


062A 


^m 


615, 615-LW 


456 


072 A 


262 


616 


456 


3622 


262 


617 


175 


3722 


262 


618 


456 






619 


456 


ELECTRIC & 


620, 620-LW 


456 


AUTO 


. PROD. 


621, 621 -LW 


456 


6-AW 


456 


622 


456 


25-A\V 


456 


623 


456 


30-AW 


456 


624 


456 


35-AW 


456 


626 


456 


303 


456 


630 


456 


303-LW 


456 


640 


175 


303-SW 


456 


735 


175 


405 


456 


746 


175 


405-LW 


456 


747 


175 


IL-5 


125 


800 


456 


IL-55 


125 


801 


456 


IL-55LW 125 


802, 802-C 


456 


SW-6 


456 


803 


450 






804 


456 


ELECTRIC 


805-A, 805-C 


456 


SPEC. 


EXPORT 


805 

811-A, 811-R 

901, 901 -C 


456 
456 
456 


69 
R-502 


456 
456 


902, 902-C 

1000 

1001 

1100 

1100 C 

1102 

1103 

A-517 

A-605 

A-606 

A-607-LW 

A-617 


456 
456 
450 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
175 
175 
456 
175 


EL-REY 

10 465 
15 465 
20 465 

644 465 

645 465 
845 465 
7-Tube A-W 465 
A 465 
B 465 
C 465 


B-A-G 
B-A-H 


177.2 
175 


EMERSON* 


B-A-H-9 


175 


1 A 


172.5— RC 


B-A-K 


465 


4B 


456— RC 


B-A-M 


465 


5 A 


172.5— RC 


B-L-G 


115 


5S 


456— RC 


K-A-F 


175 


5J 


456— RC 






6BD 


456— RC 


ECHOPHONE* 


6A 
19 


172.5— RC 
456— RC 


5 


175 


23 


456— RC 


10 


175 


26 


456— RC 


12 


175 


28 


456— RC 


14 


175 


30 AW 


456— RC 


15 


175 


30 LW 


132— RC 


16 


175 


31 AW 


456— RC 


17 


175 


31 B 


456— RC 


18 


175 


32 


456— RC 


20 


175 


32 LW 


132— RC 


35 


175 


33 AW 


456— RC 


36 


175 


33 LW 


132— RC 


38 


175 


34 


456— RC 


50 


175 


34C 


456— RC 


55 


175 


34-F7 


456— RC 


60 


175 


35-T6 


172.5— RC 


62 


115 


36 


456— RC 


65 


175 


38 


456— RC 


70 


175 


38-LW 


456— RC 



I. F. PEAKS 



and 



COLOR CODING 



'Indicates tliat the listings have been 



PART IV • RADIO TODAY 



Model I. F. 

Chassis Peak 

EMERSON* 

(Continued) 

39 456— RC 

40-W 6 175— RC 

41 456— RC 

42 456— RC 
45 456— RC 
45-LW 456— RC 

49 456— RC 

50 175— RC 
50-L 115— RC 
50-M 175— RC 
50-S 465— RC 
52-CS 175— RC 
53-JS 175— RC 
55-AW 445— RC 
55-L 115— RC 
55-S 175— RC 
59 456— RC 
70-K5 175— RC 
71 456— RC 
77 175— RC 
80-KS 175— RC 

101 456— RC 
101-F 7 456— RC 
101-U 456— RC 

102 456— RC 
102-LW 456— RC 

103 456— RC 

104 456— RC 
104-LW 456— RC 

105 456— RC 
105-LW 456— RC 

106 456— RC 

107 456— RC 
107-AC 456— RC 
107-LW 456— RC 

108 456— RC 
108-LW 132— RC 

109 456— RC 
109-LW 132— RC 

110 456— RC 
110-LW 132— RC 

111 456— RC 
111-LW 456— RC 

112 456 — RC 

113 456— RC 

114 456— RC 

115 456— RC 

116 456— RC 
117-LW 132— RC 
119 456— RC 
126-LW 132— RC 
250 172.5 — RC 
250-AW 456— RC 
250-LW 132— RC 
280 456— RC 
300 172.5— RC 
321-AW 456— RC 
321-LW 132— RC 
350-AW 456— RC 
350-LW 132— RC 
375(UV-5) 

456— RC 
375(W-6) 175— RC 

375-LW 125— RC 

450 456— RC 

667 172.5— RC 

678 172.5— RC 

755-L 115— RC 

755-M 175— RC 

755-S 465— RC 

770 456— RC 

775-L 115— RC 

775-M 175— RC 

775-S 465— RC 

965 172.5— RC 

A 456 — RC 

AA 172.5— RC 

A-7 456— RC 

A-8 456— RC 

A-11 456— RC 

A-130 456— RC 

A-132 456 — RC 

checked by the manu 



1 

Model I. F. 


Model 


I. F. 


Chassis Peak 


Chassis 


Peak 


EMERSON* 


EMERSON* 


(Continued) 


(Continued) 


AW 445— RC 


E-128 


172.5— RC 


AW-55 445— RC 


F 


456— RC 


B 456— RC 


F-5 


456— RC 


B-5 456— RC 


F-6D 


456— RC 


B-6 456— RC 


F-7 


456— RC 


B-6L 456— RC 


F-117 


456— RC 


B-8 456— RC 


F-122 


456— RC 


B-10 172.5— RC 


F-133 


456— RC 


B-11 456— RC 


F-135 


456— RC 


B-131 456— RC 


F-141 


456— RC 


B-131-LW 


G 


456— RC 


456— RC 


G-5 


456— RC 


B-AC-10 175— RC 


G-127 


456— RC 


BLW 456— RC 


H 


456— RC 


C 456— RC 


H-5 


172.5— RC 


C-6 456— RC 


H-5L 


132— RC 


C-134 456— RC 


H-5S 


172.5— RC 


C-134-LW 


H-130 


456— RC 


456— RC 


H-137 


456— RC 


C-136 456— RC 


J 


456— RC 


C-136-LW 


J (1930) 


175— RC 


456— RC 


J-106 


456— RC 


C-138 456— RC 


JS 


175— RC 


C-138-LW 


K 


456— RC 


456— RC 


K-5 


456— RC 


C-139 456— RC 


K-116 


456— RC 


C-139-LW 


K-121 


456— RC 


456— RC 


K-123 


456— RC 


C-140 456— RC 


KS 


175— RC 


C-140-LW 


L 


456— RC 


456— RC 


L-7 


115— RC 


C-142 456— RC 


L-117 


456— RC 


C-142-LW 


L-117-LW 


456— RC 




456— RC 


C-145-LW 


L-122 


456— RC 


456— RC 


L-122-LW 


CLW 456— RC 




456— RC 


CS 175— RC 


L-133 


456— RC 


D 456— RC 


L-133-LW 


D-6 456— RC 




456— RC 


D-55 456— RC 


L-135-LW 


D-134 456— RC 




456— RC 


D-134-LW 


L-135 


456— RC 


456— RC 


L-141 


456— RC 


D-136 456— RC 


L-141-LW 


D-136-LW 




456— RC 


456 — RC 


L-143 


456— RC 


D-138 456— RC 


L-143-LW 


D-138-LW 




456— RC 


456— RC 


L-144 


456— RC 


D-139 456— RC 


L-144L-W 


D-139-LW 




456— RC 


456— RC 


L-755 


115— RC 


D-140 456— RC 


LA 


172.5— RC 


D-140-LW456— RC 


M 


456— RC 


D-142 456— RC 


M-134 


456— RC 


D-142-LW 


M-136 


456— RC 


456— RC 


M-138 


456— RC 


D-146 456— RC 


M-139 


456— RC 


D-146-LW 


M-140 


456— RC 


456 — RC 


M-142 


456— RC 


D-AC-5 456— RC 


M-146 


456— RC 


DLW 456— RC 


M-755 


175— RC 


DS5 455— RC 


M-AC-7 


175— RC 


E-5 456— RC 


P 


456— RC 


C — Condense 


rs 




R.M.A. c( 


jlor coded 1 


R — Resistors 






R.M.A. c( 


3lor coded 


# —R.M.A. cc 


)lor coding 


used throu 


ghout t 


he set 









Model 


1. F. 








Chassis 


Peak 


1 






ERLA* 








SENTINEL* 








(Continued) 


i 






25A72 


465— RC 


' 






25\74 


465— RC 








31 B 


465— RC 








31B72 


465— RC 








31B74 


465— RC 








32B 


465— RC 








32B69 


465— RC 








33B 


465— RC 


■ #% 






33B70 


465— RC 


lIii 






33B71 


465— RC 


lII 






34B 


465— RC 


MIb 






34B71 


465— RC 


vll 






34B73 


465— RC 


«u 






35B 


465— RC 


■ ^^^ 






35B70 


465— RC 








35B72 


465— RC 








36L 
36L71 


455— RC 
465— RC 








'vRy, io'?7 


36L673 


465— RC 






37B 


465— RC 






38B 


465— RC 






39B 


465— RC 


Model 
Chassis 


I. F. 
Peak 


to A 
44A 
46A 


465— RC 
465 
465— RC 


EMERSON* 


A?,\ 


465— RC 


(Continued) 


49B 


465— RC 


P-117 


456— RC 


50B 


465— RC 


P-135 


456— RC 


51U 


465 


R 


455— RC 


52 A 


465 


R-152 


456— RC 


sax 


465 


R-153 


456— RC 


54 A 


465— RC 


R-156 


456— RC 


55 


465 


R-158 


456— RC 


56U 


465 


S 


456— RC 


57 A 


465 


S-7 


465— RC 


58 \ 


465 


S-50 


465— RC 


59U 


465 


S-147 


456— RC 


60B 


465 


S-755 


465— RC 


60BC 


465— RC 


S-775 


465— RC 


60BT 


465— RC 


T-6 


172.5— RC 


63B 


465— RC 


U 


262— RC 


63BC 


465— RC 


U4A 


456— RC 


63BT 


465— RC 


U4L 


132— RC 


65BC 


465— RC 


U5A 


456— RC 


65BT 


465 — RC 


U5B 


132— RC 


66B 


465— RC 


U5L 


132— RC 


66BCE 


465— RC 


U5S 


456— RC 


66BTE 


465— RC 


U6 


456— RC 


67LC 


46.5— RC 


U6A 


456— RC 


67LT 


465— RC 


U6B 


456— RC 


68BC 


465— RC 


U6C 


456— RC 


68BCE 


465— RC 


U6D 


456— RC 


68BT 


465— RC 


U6E 


456— RC 


68BTE 


465-RC 


U6F 


456— RC 


69U 


465 


U6L 


456— RC 


70 X. 


465— RC 


U-154 


262— RC 


71U 


465— RC 


UV-4 


456— RC 


106B 


175 


UV-5 


456— RC 


108 


175 


UV-5-37 


5 456— RC 


108A 


175— R 


V 


262— RC 


109 


175— R 


V-155 


262— RC 


110 


175— R 


W-6 


175— RC 


114 


175— R 


W6L 


125— RC 


118 


175— R 


X 


456— RC 


125 


175— R 


X-146 


456— RC 


252 


175 


Z 


456— RC 


257 


175 


Z-159 


456— RC 


259 


175 


Z-160 


456— RC 


261 


175 






263 


265 


EMPIRE ELEC. 


500 


465— RC 


PRODUCTS CO. 


501 


465— RC 


30 


175 — RC 


502 


465— RC 


30L 


115— RC 


510 


265— R 


40 


175 — RC 


513 


265— R 


40L 


11.5— RC 


520 


175— R 


40SW 


456— RC 


521 


175— R 


45SW 


456— RC 


530 


265— R 


50SW 


456— RC 


540 


26.5— R 


51 


175— RC 


550 


265 — R 


52 


175— RC 


560 


265— R 


60 


175— RC 


570 


465— R 


71 


175— RC 


590 


465 — R 


74 


462 5 — RC 


599 


465— R 


450A 


456— RC 


600 


265— RC 


460B 


456— RC 


601 


265— R 


470C 


456— RC 


602 


265— RC 


480C 


456— RC 


603 


265— RC 


575 


175— RC 


610 


265— RC 






614 


175— RC 


ENSIGN 


620 


465— RC 


See 


Espey 


622 


465— RC 






623 


465— RC 


ERLA* 


624 


465— RC 


SENTINEL* 


630 


465— RC 


7M 


465— RC 


634 


465— RC 


8P 


175— RC 


635 


465— RC 


lOM 


370— RC 


660 


465— RC 


lOMF 


370— RC 


810 


265 


IIM 


465— RC 


814 


265 


14A 


465— RC 


1010 


175— R 


I4A72 


465— RC 


1016 


175— R 


14A86 


465— RC 


1017 


175— R 


19A68 


465— RC 


1020 A 


115— R 


19A 


465— RC 


1030 


115— R 


19A71 


465— RC 


1030A 


115— R 


20A 


465— RC 


1040 


465— R 


20A71 


465— RC 


1046 


465— R 


20A73 


46 


5-RC 


lObO 


465— RC 



Model I. F. 

Chassis Peak 

ERLA* 
SENTINEL* 
(Continued) 

1060 465 — RC 

4300 465— RC 

4400 370 

4500 465 

5000 465— RC 

5100 465— RC 

5211 465— RC 

5500 370— RC 

5600 465— RC 

5628 465— RC 

5700 465— RC 

5721 465— RC 

5850 465— RC 

6000 265 
6100 465— RC 

6001 465— RC 
6102 465— RC 
6200 465— RC 
6232 465— RC 
6234 465— RC 
6241 465— RC 
6300 465— RC 
6313 465— RC 
6315 465— RC 
6317 465— RC 
6321 465— RC 
6323 465— RC 
7150 465— RC 
7200 465— RC 
7700 465— RC 
7732 465— RC 
7741 46b— RC 
8200 465— RC 
9100 465— RC 
45 '^C 465 
46ACE 465 

46 \T 465 

45 ATE 465 

47ACE 467 

47ATE 465 

52 AC 465 

52 ACE 465 

52 ACT 465 

52 AT ■ 465 

52 ATE 465 

57ACE 465 

57 ATE 465 

70 \C 465 

70AT 465 

ESPEY* 



451 


456 


458 


456— R 


459 


456 


464 


456 


467 


456 


472 


460 


481 


456 


545 


456— R 


553 


456— R 


555 


456— R 


560 


456— R 


564 


456— R 


555 


456 


671 


456— R 


674 


456— R 


675 


456— R 


5101 


456 


5111 


456— R 


5181 


456 


5191 


456— R 


6101 


456— R 


6141 


456— R 


FADA* 


45 


175 


48 


175 


49 


175 


51 


175 


53 


175 


55 


175 


57 


175 


65 


175 


66 


175 


73 


175 


74 


175 


76 


175 


78 


175 


79 


175 


83 


175 


85 


175 


87 


175 


88 


175 


89 


175 


93 


125 


95 


125 


97 


175 


98 


175 


101 


175 


102 


175 


104 


470 


104B 


470 


105 


470 


106 


470 


107 


470 


To he 


continued 


in 


March 


RADIO TODAY 



facturer. 



While evtry effort has been made to have this listine 100% ac- 
curate, m^ compilation of this magnitude, some errors are possible. 
Theeditors will appreciate hearing of these mistakes. Copyright 1937 by 
Caldwell-Clements. Inc. Not to be reprinted without written permission 



Acknowledgment is given to the following additional sources of information: Bernsley's 
Official Radio Seri^ice Handibook, Gernsback's Official Radio Serznce Manuals, Ghirardi's 
Radio Field Se-ruice Data, Hygrade Sylvania's Auto Radio Servicing & Installation, National 
Union's O0icial Cliart of Peak Frequencies, Rider's Perpetual Trouble Shooters Manual. 



36 



Radio Today 




dl 



tme 



^vania can m/eeyou 

OVER THE TOP!,. 




Sell Syivanias and 
Watch Your Proiits Hit 
a New High! 

• Is your tube business going over 
the top with a bang? Are you get- 
ting your share of the repeat busi- 
ness, the pleased customers and 
the profits that go to the dealer 
who sells Sylvania? 

Ask the man who profits with 



Sylvania . . . he'll tell you how it's 
done. No kick-backs... because 
Sylvania tubes have gone through 
eighty separate tests for your pro- 
tection. Fair list prices and the 
kind of technical and sales helps 
that are designed to make better 
business for you! It pays to sell 



Sylvania... because Sylvania plays 
ball with you every inch of the way ! 
You owe it to yourself and your 
business to find out about Sylvania 
NOW! For complete sales and 
technical information write to the 
Hygrade Sylvania Corporation, 
Emporium, Pa. 



SYLVANIA 



THE SET-TESTED RADIO TUBE 



February, 1937 



37 



GENERAL ELECTRIC MODEL N-60 



^SHIELD CAP'Y 85JJUFD_,._ • 40U)JFD 




GRUNOW MODEL 761 





300 
CHOKE 

. Art n . 






VjOOO" 







■i 

'■.'"','.'" ''\ 


3F5 05 6F6 
, — »-.— ^ . » , ,— i 


^.003 




EARLY PROD 
ONLY 



I.F. PEAK 455 K.C 






FUSE ON EARLY PRODUCTION — 



BOTTOM VIEW OF CHASSIS 



SERVICE NOTES 



GENERAL ELECTRIC N-60 
AUTO RADIO 

* G-E's 1936 auto radio is a 6- 
tube superhet using a non-sycliroiLOus 
vibrator power supply and a 6J7 1st 
detector-oscillator. 

A grid-leak type 1st detector is em- 
ployed and is connected across only 
part of the RF coil, and not across the 
condenser gang. The antenna coil is 
tapped for hi and lo capacity antenna 
systems. 

The 6F6 output tube obtains its 
bias from the voltage drop across the 
filter choke. RF chokes are used in 
numerous positions to filter out 
noises. 

Alignment of the oscillator takes 
place at 1650 KC with the condenser 
gang set at minimum capacity (1650 
KC, not 1400 as shown on the sche- 
matic). The RF stage is aligned at 
1400 KC, while the antenna stage is 
adjusted after installation. When the 
antenna has been connected, adjust 
the antenna trimmer b.v tuning to 
some weak station between 1400 and 
1200 KC. 

The intermediate frequency is 175 
KC. 

The 6KY and 6J7 fils are fed 
through a filament EF choke, while 
the 6Q7 and 6F6 are connected im- 
mediately after the on-off switch. Cir- 
cuit is quite conventional — arrow 
heads indicate path of the signal 
through the set. 

GRUNOW MODEL 761 
CHASSIS 7-C 

* Model 761 by Grunow is a 4- 
band set with RF amplifier on all 
bands. Circuit is quite conventional 
and utilizes metal tubes. 

A triple tuned I.F. transformer is 
employed between the modulator and 
1st I.F. amplifier. All the I.F. trim- 
mers are adjusted at 455 KC for max- 
imum output. 

Signal circuit trimmers are ad- 
justed at frequencies indicated upon 
chassis layout in usual manner. On 
the schematic the highest frequency 
coil is on top, and weather band coil 
on the bottom of each group. Short- 
ing type coil switches are used. 

The antenna coil primary circuit is 
a little unusual. When a doublet is 
connected to the D and A posts, it is 
used as a doublet only on the short 
wave-bands. The switch does the 
proper selecting. 



LOCATING INTERMITTENTS 

*■ Radio Manufacturers Service 
m.embers are making important use 
of new Philco devices and methods 
for locating and identifying intermit- 
tent connections. 

It is an old story that when sets 
have been tested and pronounced O.K. 
the customer returns with the com- 
plaint that reception is no better than 
before and the serviceman then takes 
the blame. What happens in nine of 



such cases out of ten is that an inter- 
mittent contact does not show up 
readily and that it comes and goes 
with expansion and contraction of 
the receiver. 

Within the last few months Philco 
has lined up a number of suggestions 
for meeting this problem. Among 
the remedies is the shaker table, used 
in the service department, for check- 
ing sets against intermittents. This 
tester, which can be made of odds 
and ends around the shop, will prove 
particularly valuable in the larger 
service establishments where a num- 
ber of sets are being serviced every 
day. 

The rubber mallet is another. 



-f/. 



SM 



C^ 






£<zii/y -(idjuited 



MODEL 
1200-C 



Wl 



Itk 



Model 1200-C 

VOLT-OHM- 

MILLIAMMETER 



* 5000 Ohms per Volt D.C, 

* Resistance Readings to 7.5 
Megohms. 




DEALER 
PRICE 

$24-33 



* For all Radio Measurements not Requiring a No Current Draw Vacuum Tube 
Voltmeter. 

The delicate balance of high fidelity sets requires servicing instruments capable 
of nieasnringr high resistance and all voltages accurately. 

Model 1200-C VoIt-Ohni-3Iilliamnieter has self-contained power for readings 
to 7.5 Megohms. The D,C, voltage readings are at ."OOO ohms per volt enabling vou 
to read accurately the voltages of low power. 

Has two separate instruments, A.C. and D,C., in twin case. Ohms Scales sep- 
arately adjusted. 

Scale Reads: A.C. and D.C. 10-.50-250-500-1000 Volts, the D.C. is at ,jOO0 Ohms 
per volt! 2.50 Microamperes; 1-10-50-2.50 Milliamperes; Vb to 500 Ohms, l.jO0 Ohms, 
1.5 and 7.5 Megohms. 



See ITour Jobber 



A TRIPLETT MASTER UNIT 



Write for Catalog 



%iHQ COUPON NOW 



r 




' The Triplett Electrical Instrument Co. 
I 192 Harmon Avenue, Bluffton, Ohio 
. J_^ Without obligation please ^end me more infor- 

I mation on Model 1200-C; Complete 

I Triplett Master Unit Line. 



Name . . 

Address 

City State. 



^JEtECTRlCAL jnstrum ENTS|___-__-_-__-_____'l_-__-__ J 



February, 1937 



39 




■ 



40 



Radio Today 



SERVICE NOTES 

Througli its application, contacts can 
be caused to be opened or closed semi- 
permanently on striking. 

In those cases where intermittents 
do not show up until the chassis has 
become thoroughly heated, an ordi- 
nary reflector-type electric heater can 
l)p directed at the under side of the 
cliaseis and the set then turned on and 
allowed to play for a few minutes. 

Sometimes low-resistance AC re- 
la.vs connected in the voice-coil cir- 
cuit of the set can obtain clues to 
the trouble. When the intermittent 
connection makes or breaks, as the 
case might be, the relay opens and 
thus closes a switch that will ring a 
buzzer or bell to notify the service- 
man that the set is no longer operat- 
ing. 

DECIB£L GAIN & WHAT IT MEANS 

The usual method of measuring the 

gain of an amplifier is to apply an 

AC voltage across a resistor in the 

grid circuit of the first tube and to 

measure the voltage developed across 

a non-inductive load resistor in the 

output circuit. The decibel gain of 

the amplifier based on the formula : 

,„ , Output Watts 

DB. gam = 10 10B,„ i„p„t ^„„, 

becomes 

,„ , (Output volts)= X input resistance 

10 l02,n -^; 

(Input volts) = X output resistance 
From this equation it will be seen 
that the voltage gain of the amplifier 
increases in direct proportion to any 
increase in input resistance if the 
input voltage remains constant. 

3Iost mauf acturers of crystal micro- 
phones rate the output at — TO DB. 
referred to the usual 6 milliwatt zero 
level when operated into a 5 megohm 
resistance load. On this basis, it 
would appear that an amplifier de- 
signed to operate from a crystal 
microphone and to have a power out- 
put of 18 watts (34.9 DB.) should 
have an over-all gain of TO plus 34.9 
or 104.9 DB. 

By trial, however, it will be found 
that such an amplifier does not have 
sufficient gain. The reason is ap- 
parent on careful analysis. In opera- 
tion, the grid resistor is actually 
shunted by the crystal microphone, 
■whose average imjjedanee is in the 
neighborhod of 100,000 ohms. Hence 
the input resistance of the amplifier 
would also be approximately this same 
^'alue. In computing the gain with 
100,000 ohms grid resistance, the in- 
put power is 50 times what it would 
be with a 5 megohm grid resistance, 
and the DB. gain correspondingly 
lower. 
(Service section continued on page 55) 




M-jook . , . it's Radiobar!'' ''Isn't 
it the most beautiful piece of furniture you've ever seen?" "How prac- 
tical — what a space-saver — Dad, let's BUY a Radiobar!" 

Mr. Radio Dealer, listen! 
America is talking about the 
biggest, handsomest "eye- 
arrester" in the business. 
Wherever there is a Radio- 
bar in a window, you find 
customers milling up, en- 
thusiastic comment, more 
store traffic. 



RADIOBAR 

CO. of AMERICA 

60 WARREN STREET 
NEW YORK CITY 
7100 McKINLEY AVENUE 
LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 



Make your store-frontage do double- 
duty, now. Have the most magnetic 
window on the street! A Radiobar can 
do it — for Radiobar is a "sight-seller" 
12 months a year! 

r R C fc ! Handsome new attention- 
compelling displays for floor and win- 
dows. Banners, counter cards, back- 
grounds^-everything you need for a 
selling job! 

Mail today to nearest office— Dept. RT237 

R,4DIOBAR CO. OF AMERICA 

60 Warren Street, N. Y. C. or 

7100 McKinley Avenue, Los Angeles 

Please send me complete information about FREE 

Radiobar displays □ Please rusk complete 

Radiobar story to me G 



Nan 



City State 



UNIVERSAL 

PORTABLE 
Recording Machine 

A precision machined, compact outfit that 
positively eliminates all waver — Records 
in either direction at 33^4, or 78 rpm. — 
90, 110 or 130 lines per inch — 110 volt 
AC 100% synchronous motor — Solid 16 
in. turntable — Constant speed rim belt 
drive — Reinforced black leatherette 
carrying cases — unequalled value — 
Superlative performance — Also sta- 
tionary machines, amplifiers, cutting heads, special acetate pickup, etc. 

UNIVERSAL MICROPHONE CO.. Ltd. 

424 WARREN LANE INGLEWOOD, CALIF., U.S.A. 




February, 1937 



41 



piiBm^fi^^ 



WE. 



"SfJiS ph'icit> 




PRESTO RECORDER 

. . . reveal widespread demand fo( 
a good low priced instrument. 
Offered to dealers only three 
months ago . . . the Presto Model D 
Recorder now rates center position 
in dealers' window and floor display 
. . . the spot reserved exclusively for 
profitable, fast moving merchandise. 

SALES RECORDS SHOW 

. . . that every school, college, radio 
station, orchestra leader, church 
and civic organization is a live 
prospect for the recorder. 
. . . that there is good money in 
making records For musicians, radio 
artists, public speakers, stores, hotels 
and industrial organizations. 

Get ihe best of this business in your 
section! 

WRITE NOW for dealer proposition 
and tested sales promotion data. 

fslOTE: ^'"' """I'' shown makes phono- 
graph records equal to any com- 
mercial record in brilliant, life- 
like reproduction of voice and 
music. It plays any record, up 
to 12", and also operates as a 
public address system. 

WORLD'S LARGEST MANUFAC- 
TURERS OF INSTANTANEOUS 
RECORDING EQUIPMENT 

PRECID 



RECORDING CORPORATION 



137 West 19th Street, New York, N. Y. 



SAVING ON INCOME TAXES 

(From paye 12) 

tion it is to the tax-payer's advantage 
to time his sales and select the prop- 
erty to be sold so that his capital 
losses in any one year do not exceed 
his capital gains by more than $2,000. 

As an alternative to high earnings 
many business men and corporations 
take advantage of expenses such as 
advertising and research, which while 
chargeable as expenses for the cur- 
rent year, when taxes are high, have 
the effect of increasing future values 
in the years when lower tax rates may 
be expected. Advertising and research 
outlays thus become advantageous 
ways of absorbing extra corporation 
profits. 

Inventories may be valued at either 
(1) "cost" or (2) "cost or market 
whichever is lower." Tax-payers were 
allowed to select the basis preferred 
when the law was passed in 1920, but 
are required to adhere to the selection 
made, unless special permission is se- 
cured. A new business may adopt 
either method on the first return, 
ilethod No. 2 has the result of min- 
imizing taxes for the present year. 

Reserves for bad debts may be 
charged off specifically, or allowances 
of a reasonable proportion may be 
set up, but once having accepted 
either plan, the tax-payer is thereafter 
bound to follow it. A new organiza- 
tion may make its 'choice on the ini- 
tial return. 



PROFITS FROM RECORDERS 

(From page 18) 

Dealers who face the necessity of 
building recording rooms or studios 
in their stores will find the manufac- 
turers' engineers ready to assist. 
Time payments are also available to 
dealers who want to wait for the extra 
profit involved. 

In ISTew York City alone there are 
10 manufacturers who are active in 
making and promoting recorders and 
accessories. These are Allied Eecord- 
ing Co. ; Deneose, Inc. ; Electrical 
Laboratories, Inc.; Fairchild Aerial 
Camera Corp. (Woodside, Long 
Island) ; Fidelitone Records : Miles 
Reproducer Co.; Mirror Record Corp.; 
Piezoelectric Laboratories (New Dorp, 
Staten Island) ; Presto Recording 
Corp., Sound Apparatus Co. and 
Speak-0-Phone. 

In Hollywood, Cal., are the Elec- 
tronic Sound Laboratories, Eadiotone 
Recording Equipment Co., and the 
Recording Equipment Mfg. Co. Else- 
where in California are the Remler 
Co., San Francisco, and the Universal 



Microphone Co., Inglewood. In New 
Jersey are Rangertone, Inc., Newark, 
and RCA Mfg. Co., Camden. 

MORE MONEY IN PARTS 

(From page 25) 
the way of complete stoclcs. Service 
in the way of frequent and prompt 
deliveries. Service in the form of 
competent technical assistance. Ser- 
ice in the way of competent merchan- 
dising assistance. All these things, 
combined with some judicious selling 
on the part of the jobber's salesmen, 
makes for a permanent customer. 

"A permanent customer can be in- 
duced to order at least $5 worth of 
merchandise at a time. A permanent 
customer can be sold on the idea of 
buying a quality product at a reason- 
able price, rather than falling for 
every cut-priced inducement that 
comes along. A permanent customer 
can be sold the nationally known 
product the jobber handles, rather 
than insisting on some particular 
brand of merchandise that the jobber 
does not carry and in that way forc- 
ing the jobber to either duplicate his 
lines or lose the business. 

"We know one jobber who is work- 
ing 100 per cent along these lines. 
He is located in a comparatively quiet 
neighborliood of a big city. He has 
plenty of typical big-city competition. 
Yet this jobber carries only one line 
of each of the types of merchandise 
he handles. He delivers, any time, 
anywhere, provided the order exceeds 
$10. He sells at regular discount 
only, UNLESS THE ORDER IS 
LESS THAN $5, in which case the 
discount is reduced. He is never out 
of anything, and his salesmen call on 
his trade regularly. That jobber in 
19.56 sold over $100,000 worth of radio 
parts exclusive of tuhes, and we'll 
leave it to your judgment as to 
whether he made a profit. 

"It is only a question of time be- 
fore those jobbers who refuse to rec- 
ognize the fact that radio parts job- 
bing is a legitimate business and must 
be conducted along legitimate busi- 
ness lines in order to survive, are go- 
ing to be forced out of the picture. 
In the meantime those jobbers who 
have established themselves firmly on 
a sound basis are going to profit, now 
and in the future. The parts manu- 
facturer is only too willing to co- 
operate with the jobber to achieve this 
condition. Why not take stock of 
your own conditions now and see if 
you cannot work out something along 
lines similar to those suggested, to fit 
your own business," comments Mr. 
Karet in conclusion, adding: "We 
feel sure the results will be well worth 
it." 



42 



Radio Today 




FRIGIDnniE SHATTERS All RECORDS 
AND PUTS DN M;7/ SPEED FDR IS37! 



Over 4,000,000 Frigidaires Sold . . . 500,000 in 1936 Alone 

...and you'll do STILL BETTER with Frigidaire in 1937— BECAUSE, 1. You'll have a Sensational Nev/ 
Product — designed from top to bottom with startling new features — including one that will instantly 
capture the imagination of the buying public, and start dealers talking from coast to coast! 2. You'll 
have an unbeatable New Selling Strategy! 3. You'll have Millions More Advertising Messages work- 
ing for you — every one packed with new selling power . . . more dramatic, more appealing, more 
action-compelling than ever! With this potent program, Frigidaire is putting on MORE SPEED for 
1937. And Frigidaire Dealers are preparing for another, an even greater, record-shattering year! 

FRIGIDAIRE DIVISION • GENERAL MOTORS SALES CORPORATION • DAYTON, OHIO 



YOUlLDoSniL 



February, 1937 



Vt FtU&IDAI 



'37k 



43 



NEIGHBORHOOD SHOP PLUGS APPLIANCES 



Colony Radio tells How to sell the neighbors on your store. 



* "We thought the neighborhood 
was not as well acquainted with us 
as it might be, particularly since a 
lot of new homes were being built in 
the vicinity," explained Henry E. 
Marschalk of the Colony Eadio Com- 
pany in Washington, D. C. "So we 
decided to get out a series of three 
circular letters telling them all about 
ourselves and where we are located. 

"We sent these letters out four days 
apart and they paved the way very 
nicely for a house-to-house canvass 
which was our next move in 'step- 
ping up' the sales to the neighbors. 
And why not intensively cultivate 
your neighborhood business? A ser- 
vice call in your immediate neigh- 
borhood costs much less and puts 
more money into your pocket than 
one several miles away. 

"These letters opened the door wide 
to our house-to-house salesmen. Prior 
to that it was a very cold canvass. 
After receiving our letters, people 
sort of felt that thev knew us and 
were more friendly. And just as soon 
as we got through the mailing of the 
letters (staggered 200 at a time), we 



started on the canvass before they got 
cold. 

"We concentrated on radio sales, 
but also covered electric refrigerators, 
washers and ironers. We have three 
men out on these appliances, but we 
are also pushing electric ironers and 
are putting on two more men. We 
employ from three to five men in our 
repair department. 

"In our letters we pounded on the 
fact that Colony Radio is a neigh- 
borhood store which can render better, 
faster service until as late as ten 
o'clock at night. We told them about 
our large stock of radios and about 
our radio service. We featured time 
payment and budget accounts. We 
invited them to come to the store in 
the evening and look over our selec- 
tion of more than a hundred different 
kinds of radios. In our third letter 
we stressed the electric washer. These 
letters read in part : 



NO SYMPATHY. PLEASE! 
The plea ot local merchants to "pat- 
ronize your neighborhood store" often 
seems based on a desire tor sympathy 
for the little fellow. But we believe 



FIRST REFRIGERATOR EVER TO BE EOUIPPED WITH A RADIO SET 




BUILT-IN radio on a new Crosley Shelvador is shown in Texas by Hymen 
Reader, Houston distributor, pictured here with a hand on the dial. 



that most people do not buy out of 
sympathy. They buy because they 
can get what they want at prices as 
low or lower than elsewhere. 

Colony Radio is a "neighborhood" 
store only because it is located near 
your home .... for better, faster ser- 
vice to you, even until 10:00 o'clock 
at night. 

Unlike most "neighborhood" stores. 
Colony Radio now stocks more than 
one hundred radios in a complete 
range of sizes, styles and prices .... 
a selection hardly equalled anywhere. 
Prices are the same as any other rep- 
utable concerns. 

In its ten years of steady, solid 
growth, Colony Radio has found, too, 
that the public appreciates good ser- 
vice on their radios. That is why 
Colony's Service Department today is 
unequalled in Washington. That is 
why Colony advertises "Where Service 
Backs Up Every Sale." 

You will profit when you buy your 
new radio at our store. 

II 

To Our Neighbors, Friends and 
Customers: 

In our introductory letter to you the 
other day, we stressed the point that 
our store always Is well stocked; that 
we now offer more than one hundred 
radios for your careful selection. This 
alone makes Colony Radio an excep- 
tional store. 

In addition we are right in your 
neigliborhood, which makes a night 
call easy. You can come down here at 
your leisure after dinner and look over 
our line without obligation to buy. A 
service call can be answered in ten 
minutes or less, because we are in 
your immediate neighborhood. 

With the air chockfull of the most 
interesting programs in years and with 
today's radios so much better than sets 
four or five years old, you owe it to 
yourself and your family to turn in 
that old radio for a brand new one. 
Dials which are so very easy to read, 
perfected automatic volume control, 
more graceful and modern cabinets . . . 
all contribute so much to the enjoy- 
ment of your modern radio. 

Why not come to the store this eve- 
ning and make your selection? 
Beautiful de luxe console radios in 
* * * may be bought for as little as 
$5.00 a month .... less than $1.25 a 
week! Or, if you prefer, telephone 
Col. 0067. and we shall be glad to ar- 
range a demonstration in your home. 

Ill 
To Our Neighbors, Friends and 
Customers: 

In our other tw'o letters to you we 
stressed both good radio service and 
our well-balanced stock of more than 
one hundred new radios. But we had 
no intention of overlooking the other 
merchandise that we sell. 

Our outstanding product is the * * 
washing machine .... sturdy, simple 
to use, faster, and does better wash- 



44 



Radio Today 



ing than can be done by any other 
means. Also your * * always is avail- 
able for washing the little extra things 
that need cleansing between regular 
washings. In addition, you may wash 
the small bathroom rugs, the blankets 
and the lace curtains for which you 
would have to pay a lot extra at a 
laundry. 

At our store, you may purchase a * * 
for as little as $4.50 a month. Com- 
pare this w-ith your present laundry 
costs, in damaged and lost clothes, 
plus the laundry bill. 

It would be a pleasure to demon- 
strate a * * in your home (no obliga- 
tion, of course) if j-ou will just tele- 
phone us, Co. 0067. Why not do it 
now? 

Frigidaire super-duty boxes 




Bed-blooded and floufisliing 
organization of dealers in 
Brooliyn, N. T., w discovered 
in another spotlight. Years old 
and. difiniiely on its feet, this 
Electrical Appliance Dealers 
Ass'n, Inc., felt a surge of sym- 
pathy for dealers in the flood 
areas whose sales floors ivere 
lately under water. At a re- 
cent meeting the membership 
arose and in a few minutes 
shelled out $109 for a relief 
fund. Association treasury 
matched, this amount, so that a 
neat total of $218 was ready for 
the local Bed Cross. 



Norge Roilator refrigerators 



* Line for 1937 consists of 5 mas- 
ter, 4 de luxe and 1 imperial models. 
Storage capacities range from 4.1 cu. 
ft. to 13. .5, with shelf areas varying 
from 8.9 sq. ft. to 29.5. Features are 
lifetime porcelain, instant cube-release, 
automatic tray release, 9-way adjusta- 
ble interior, portable utility shelf, slid- 
ing hydrators, food-safety indicator, 
and additional items. Illustrated here- 
with is de luxe 7-37, with 7.2 cu. ft. 
capacity. Frigidaire Division, General 
Motors Sales Corp., Dayton, Ohio. — 
R.^Dio Top.\Y. — See also advt. p. 43. 




* Included in 1937 line for Norge 
are 2 low-temp models, 5 de luxe, and 
3 standard. Capacities vary from 4.25 
cu. ft. to 12.25. with shelf areas rang- 
ing from 9.06 sq. ft. to 17.10. Two de 
lu-xe mode's are available in mother- 
of-pearl, green or tan exterior finish. 
Features include redesigned evaporator 
door and hydrovoir, ice tray release, 
adjustable insert shelf, bottle rack, 
sliding utility basket, etc. Pictured 
here is low-temp model 81-37; capacity 
8.08 cu. ft. Norge Division, Borg-War- 
ner Corp., Detroit, Mich. — R.vDio Tod.\y. 



BEST SELLING RECORDS AS 
WE GO TO PRESS 



BLVEBIRD 

This Year*s IvLsse.s. The Girl on the 
i'olice Gazette. Both with Shep Fields 
and his Rippling Rhythm — B6757. 

Serenade in the \'ight, lattle Old Lad?-. 

Both with Shep Fields and his Rippling 
Rhythm — B6747. 

Goodnig:ht My Love. One Aever KnoiTS 
— Doe.s One? Both with Shep Fields 
and his Rippling- Rhythm — B66S5. 



BRUXSM'ICK 

That's Life I Guess. Pennies From 
Heaven. Both with VC by Billie Holi- 
day, both with Teddy AVilson and his 
orchestra — 7789. 

Serenade in the Night — waltz. VC by 
Russ Brown. Dear Diary. VC by Lew 

Palmer. Both with Jan Garber and his 
orchestra — 7 804. 

I've Got Yon Under My Skin. VC by 

Skinny Ennis. Easy To Love. VC by 

Bob Allen. Both with Hal Kemp and 
his orchestra — 7745. 

COLVMBI.V 

Serenade in the Niglit — tango. Me and 
the Moon. Both vrith vocal refrain, 
both with Mantovani and his Tipica 
orchestra — 3159D. 

Mr. Ghost Goes to To«n. Alp:ier.s Stomp 

— stomp. Both by Hills Blue Rhythm 
Band under direction of Luckv Mil- 
linder — 31581). 

Calltn' Yonr Bluft' — stomp. Big John's 
Sperial. Both with Mills Blue Rhvthm 
Band — 3162D. 

DECCA 

(By titles) 

Pennies From Heaven. Bing Crosby — 
947. Jimmy Dorsev and his orchestra 

— 9.t1. 



Goodnight 3Iy Love. Ruth Etting — 
1107. Mai Hallet and his orchestra — 

1047. 

When My Dream Boat Conies Home. 

.\1 Donahue and his orchestra — 982. 



Xever Should Have Told Yon. Y"on Can 
Tell She Comes From Dixie. Both with 



Benny Goodman and his orchestra — ■ 
25500. 

This Year's Kisses. He Ain't Got 
Rhythm. Both w-ith Benny Goodman 
and his orchestra — 25505. 

Wlio's .Vfraid of Love. One in a Mil- 
lion, Both with "Fats" Waller and his 
Rhythm — 25499. 



NEW LOW COST INTERCOMMUNICATORS APPEAL TO AVERAGE PROSPECTS 




February, 1937 



TWO-WAY communication via Philco-Phone, selling to office, home, factory. 

45 




TALK about convenience ! Talk about economy ! 
Talk about heat-wave-proof protection to food ! 
Name anything you think a refrigerator should have 
and should do to clinch sales. The Fairbanks-Morse 
Conservador Refrigerator for 1937 has it and will 
do it! Behind that nameplate are the greatest im- 
provements in modern home refrigeration. The pat- 
ented, exclusive CONSERVADOR. New twin-sealed 
door with insulation on the outer side. Simplified tem- 
perature control. Automatic overload protector that 
resets itself. Self -sealing crisper for vegetables. Sliding 
fruit drawer. Utility storage com- 
partment. New low cost of opera- 
tion that you can prove, not in 
kilowatts, not by obscure com- 
parison, but in pennies, right on 
your sales room floor. 



FREE FLOOR PLAN 

For a limited time only — A Free Floor 
Plan on your initial order. This, plus 
a limited recourse finance plan at no 
cost to the dealer, means that you can 
cash in on the early buying market. 

Your distributor has the details 



DIFFERENCES THEY CAN SEE — YOU CAN SELL! 

Fairbanks-Morse dealers have a refrigerator line for 
1937 that is modern — different. Replete with selling 
features that are easy to see — easy to demonstrate — 
that take this new line out of the field of comparative 
sameness — that will clinch sales where small differ- 
ences would fail. Why not see if you can get this 
greater profit line? There may be a franchise avail- 
able in your territory. Write or wire for the name of 
your Fairbanks-Morse distributor. Fairbanks, Morse 
& Co., Home Appliance Division, 
2060 Northwestern Avenue, In- 
dianapolis, Indiana. Other Fair- 
banks-Morse products : Washing 
Machines, Ironers, Radios, Auto- 
matic Coal Burnes. 



FAIRBANKS- MORSE 



46 



Radio Today 



ON THE TRADE TICKER 



* Shure Bros., Chicago manufac- 
turers of mikes and acoustic devices, 
have recently been licensed by Brush 
Development Co. for the making of 
plezo-electric record reproducers. 
Shure company is busy with the de- 
velopment and manufacture of Ro- 
chelle salt crystal devices now being 
licensed for mikes, vibration pick- 
ups and record reproducers under the 
Brush patents. 

* All district sales representa- 
tives of the Ken-Rad Tube & Lamp 
Corp. met recently at the firm's head- 
quarters at Owensboro, Ky. Execs on 
the program were C J. HoUatz, vice- 
president and general manager; 
"Bud" Mathews, sales manager; and 
A. O. Perlltz, sales promotion man- 
ager. Guests heard brand new sales 
plans for 1937. 

* At a recent meeting of The 
Representatives, two new members 
were added to the fast growing 
roster; Robert M. Campion, Dallas, 
Tex., and E. C. Edwards, Cleveland, 
O., both of whom are veterans in the 
radio industry. 

* Fort Wayne, Ind., chapter of 
the Institute of Radio Sei-vice Men 
recently elected officers as follows: 
chairman, Robert Stone; vice-chair- 
man, Harold Ramm; secretary treas- 
urer, Edward Moennig. Committee 
chairmen appointed were Henry 
SchrjTcr, 'Fred Pembleton, Marcel- 
his Miller and T. R. Eiler. 

* Emerson Radio & Phonogi'aph 
Coi-p. staged its first annual get-to- 
gether dinner and entertainment for 
the Metropolitan dealer organization 
of Xew York on Jan. 2 5 with nearly 




J. P. KENNEDY, lately appointed 

advertising and sales manager for 

Triumph Mfg. Co., Chicago. 



7 50 dealers present. Toastmaster 
was Xate Hast, eastern sales man- 
ager for Emerson. Execs of the firm 
were introduced, climaxed by the 
appearance of Ben .\brams, presi- 
dent, who announced the formation 
of a new Emerson organization in 
the area called Emerson-Xew York, 
Inc. Mr. Abrams' brother, Louis, 
will head the new company. Mr. 
Hast then presented the Spring 1937 
line of home and auto sets, including 
a total of 8 new receivers. Featured 
also were Emerson's new display 
fixtures, the "silent salesmen." 

Similar affair was held in Newark. 
N. J., at which was announced the 
formation of the distributing cor- 
poration, Emei-son-Xew .lersey, a 
company dedicated to servicing of 
dealers in northern Xew Jersey. 

* Chas. A. Verschoor, president 
of International Radio Coip., has 

announced further boosting of pro- 
duction schedules to meet the dealer 
demands for the new Kadette auto- 
dial Model 3 5. Report is that the 
introduction of the table model with 
a telephone-type dial created a coast- 
to-coast stir. 

• Executives of the Tong-Soi 
Lamp Works, radio tube division, 
Newark, N. J., hope that with the 
company's new factory now in full 
operation, delayed shipments during 
peak months will be eliminated. 
Tung-Sol consignment selling plan to 
dealers who can qualify will be con- 
tinued. 

♦ Opening of new radio (exclu- 
sively) distributing branch in New 
Jersey was occasion of gala General 
Electric meeting at Newark's Essex 
House, January 21st. Walter T. 
Feriy will be in charge of new set- 
up under D. W. May, district radio 
sales manager. 

Speakers of the evening were E. 
H. A'ogel, G-E's radio manager 
(Bridgeport) who reviewed Co.'s 
accomplishments and "the thinking 
of a great firm." 

Doc W. R. G. Baker, Chief Engi- 
neer, Bridgeport, pointed out that 
maintainance of leadership was "tied 
back to the research activities of a 
company" — and that G-E was one of 
the few having research labs. 

D. W. May explained policies of 
G-E which were enthusiastically re- 
ceived by the 7 50 dealer-guests and 
announced a new "trade-in" model 
receiver with long discounts. Others 
present were Bill Saunders, Philly 
radio sales mgr.; John Abrams, local 
credit mgr.; Bill Han-ison, Newark's 
G-E distrib. ; Lee Williams, district 
mgr. of G-E Supply Corp. ; R. M. 
Hoey, Bridgeport office; Earl Fore- 
man and Sam Hammer, N Y. office. 

+ New York office of the Hytron 
Coip., under the direction of D. H. 
Cohen, has moved to larger quarters 
at 315 Fourth Ave., N. Y. C. 



* As Galvin Mfg. Co.'s new plant 
takes shape at 4 545 Augusta Blvd., 
Chicago, the trade discovers that the 
building will be ultra-modern in de- 
sign, following lines inspired by bet- 
ter buildings at the Chicago 'R^orld's 
Fair. First floor occupies about one 
city block; plant will be the new 
home of Motorola home as well as 
auto sets after April 1. 

* Expansion plans of Detrola 
Radio & Television CoiiJ., Detroit, 
include a recent move into neAv loca- 
tion at Beard and Chatfield Aves. 
Move will give the firm nearly 4 
times its former fioor space, will 
provide room for branching out into 
new manufacturing branches, accord- 
ing to John J. Ross, Detrola presi- 
dent. 



2439 




RADIO 

BUSINESS 

hujuujaHettf 

By A. A. Ghirardi and T. S. Ruggles 
In this one big book you'll set 2,199 money- 
making Ideas, plans and methods that have already 
been tested and proved sound and practical In 
building up successFul radio businesses throughout 
the country. The first and only book of its kind! 

SELLING — Getting prospects. Inside and outside 
selling. Sales talks. Breaking down sales resistance- 

ADVERTISING— Planning. How to write your 
own eFFective advertising. Displays. Direct Mail. 
Newspaper and other Forms oF advertising. Publicity. 
Merchandising. Contests. Follow-ups. 

BUSINESS METHODS— Management data. Ac- 
counting. Collections. Forms and records. Policies- 



Applies to 
sale of sets, 
servicing. 
Auto Ra' 
dio, P. A. 
work, ap- 
pliances. 



OVER 

400 

PAGES 

• 



CLIP<M</MAIL 





RADIO & 
TECHNICAL i 
PUBL. CO. : 

45 Astor PI., New York ^ 

Dcpt. RTO-27 



Please send me free circular BB. 

Name 

Address 



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February, 1937 



47 



NOKOIl 



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Export Dept.: M. Simons & Son Co., INew Yorii 

Cable Address: "Simontrice" 

Canadian Office: Associated Sales Co., Guelph, Ont. 




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giving the radio-man what he wants, when he wants 
it, and at the right prices. This new 1937 Radoiek 
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of new items. Merchan- 
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Serviceman? D Dealer? □ Experimenter? D 




TRADE FLASHES 



* Clarence A. Earl, formerly 
president of Earl Radio Co., and 
vice-president of Willys-Overland, 
Inc., has been elected president of 
the Arctunis Radio Tube Co., New- 
ark, N. J. The company will an- 
nounce shortly the addition of several 
new lines allied to the radio-tube 
business. 

* Charles S. Halpeni, president 
of the Halson Radio Mfg. Co., New 
York, N. Y., announced this week 
the appointment of Lewis E. Dorf- 

man as sales manager of the com- 
pany. One of the real old-timers of 
the radio industry, Mr. Dorfman has 
a coast-to-coast acqtiaintance and 
friendship among jobbers and deal- 
ers that makes him a very valuable 
addition to the fast-growing Halson 
organization. Within a few weeks 
Charlie and Phil Halpern, vice-presi- 
dent of the company, will have sev- 
eral interesting announcements to 
make regarding 19 37 merchandising 
and manufacturing expansion plans. 

■*■ An increase of approximately 
2 5 per cent in manufacturing space, 
with resultant increase in the produc- 
tion of IRC insulated metallized re- 
sistors, metallized volume-controls, 
and precision and heavy-duty wire- 
wound resistors has been made by 
the International Resistance Co., 401 
X. Broad Street, Philadelphia, Penna. 
All production space and executive 
offices are still on one floor, a block 
long, in the spacious Terminal Com- 
merce Building, into which IRC 
moved pbout one year ago, with a 
substantial increase in productive 
space. Even this new space became 
inadequate, and the present addition 
was necessitated. Both President 
Eniest Searing and General Manager 
Fred D. Williams are optimistic re- 
garding the outlook for 1937. 

* Wincharger Corporation, Sioux 
City, Iowa, announces its 6-volt De- 
Luxe Wincharger will henceforth be 
sold through dealers — apart from 
the radio coupon arrangement — at a 
retail price of $2 5. Former arrange- 
ment, tinder which purchasers of a 
new 6-volt farm radio receive a cou- 
pon permitting purchase of the 6- 
volt Wincharger at $15, will still 
prevail. Object of new set-up is to 
make Winchargers available to the 
thousands of present battery-set 
owners who want to be free of bat- 
tery-charging troubles. "Beauty of 
new set-up, from the dealer's stand- 
point," explains Sales Manager W. 
W. Watts, "is, of course, that there 
is a $10 profit for dealer in the $25 
price, whereas the sale of a Win- 
charger at $15 has always been a no- 
profit transaction for dealer. How- 
ever, many dealers will sell radios 
to customers who come in to buy 
Winchargers at $2 5, as the $10 sav- 
ing with a radio, is an important 
sales argument." Distributors for 
the 21 radio manufacturers using 
Wincharger who wish to stimulate 
6-volt farm-radio sales, will continue 
to handle this wind-driven generator 
on a no-profit basis. 




JIMMIE DAVIN, just-named assist- 
ant to Grunow president. 



■k Arturo Toscanini, famed con- 
ductor, has accepted an invitation of 
David Samoff, RCA chief, to return 
to U. S. and broadcast a series of 
concerts with the NBC Symphony 
Orchestra. Series will be non-com- 
mercial, will get the biggest possible 
hook-up, are scheduled to begin late 
this year. 

■*■ Radlobar Co. of America, Los 

Angeles, Calif., has appointed Reiss 
Advertising, Inc., 12 70 Sixth Ave., 
New York, to direct its account. 

* Edward McCarthy has an- 
nounced his resignation as division 
radio manager for GB in Chicago. A 
vet radio man, his specialties have 
also included refrigeration, cabinets 
and tubes. After a Florida Tacation 
he will return to the East. 




NOW IN CHARGE of engineering 

and production for Standard Trans- 
former Corp. Everett E. Gramer. 



48 



Radio Today 



(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 4) 



foREvBRyONBl f 



WITH THE 

AMAZING NEW "AERATOR 




»» 



(STOPS THAT ODOR) 



'^- 






THE 



mj}i 



ECONO-PHASE VACUUM UNIT 
ND THE HANDY SERV-SHELF 



OH EVt*^^^^*;,, Faster 

TO Assure P»r'=''%=hJ» Tempera*"'^ 
^^ uniform She" ^ 



•k Here it is . . . the refrigerator with the 
SELL! The great big new beautiful Grunow Refrigerator 
for 1937. Enthusiastic dealers everywhere say that here 
is another merchandising natural . . . with the same kind 
of sales "IT" that made TELEDIAL the 1937 sensation 
of the radio industry. And why not? Look at all the per- 
formance features that can really be demonstrated! . . . 
Faster freezing! . . . Double ice-cube capacity (168 cubes) 
even in lowest priced models! . . . The amazing new 
AERATOR that sweeps the interior clean of all food 
odors! . . . The marvelous Carrene Econo-Phase Vacuum 
Freezing Unit! . . . And new cabinet styles by Walker, the 
ace of industrial designers! Then there's a brand new 
finance plan ... a new factory service plan . . . and the 
most unusual advertising campaign ever put behind the 
merchandising of a mechanical refrigerator! Get full 
details today by mailing the coupon, or by wire! 

GENERAL HOUSEHOLD UTILITIES COMPANY 
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS MARION, INDIANA 

Manufacturers of Grunow Carrene Refrigerator • Grunow 
Household Radios • Grunow Automobile Radios 

Ask About the New 
GRUNOW LOW-COST FINANCE PLAN! 



MAIL THIS COUPON NOW! 



February, 1937 



^ 



1 




-^^c-^-"-^^^ ••■• .-... 



t^ame 

Store Sa"'^--- "" 
Addr^'' 

on--"" 



_S(a(e. 



49 



NEW THINGS FROM THE MANUFACTURERS 



Rotary instrument switches 




* Switches with low contact resist- 
ance and high surface leakage. Mul- 
tiple leaf phosphor bronze switch arms. 
— constant contact resistance — 0.0015 
ohm or less. Available in single and 
double deck with 11 points — silver or 
brass contacts. Illustrated type 531 — 
brass list $2, silver $2.50. Shallcross 
Mfg. Co., 10 Jackson Ave., Collingdale, 
Pa. — Radio Today. 

Tube checker & multi-meter 




■*• Power output emission type 
checker. Neon test for shorts and 
opens. Separate diode test. Metered 
paper condenser test — electrolytic leak- 
age. DC volts, mils, ohms. AC volts 
and decibel meter. Portable-counter 
type case of oak. Model 1504 — net 
$56.67. Triplett Electrical Instrument 
Corp., 122 Main St., Bluffton, Ohio— 
Radio Today. — See also advt. p. 39. 

Million test instruments 




* 3 new instruments by Million 
included tube checker TM ($18.95 
net), tube tester with analyzer TV 
($27.95), AC-DC multi-meter VO 
($19.95). Type TM has a good-bad 
meter for tube tests and hot neon 
leakage — line voltage adjustment. 
Tests condensers for leakage. TV 



same as TM but with analyzer scales: 
0/.3/ 3/30/300/600 mils; 0/30/300/900 
DC volts at 5000 ohms per volt; 0/ 
lOM/15 megs resistance; .01-3 mfd. 
0-9 amperes. Has illuminated meter. 
Million Radio & Telev. Labs., 361 W. 
Superior St., Chicago, 111. — Radio To- 

D.\Y. 

RCA test equipment 



Dykanol capacitors 




•k Cathode ray oscillograph using 
913 tube — vertical and horizontal am- 
plifiers flat from 30-10,000 cycles. Lin- 
ear sweep circuit 30-10,000 cycles. Sen- 
sitivity 1.75 volts RMS for full-scale 
deflection — calibrated screen. Focus 
and beam centering controls. Model 
151 — net $47.50. Electronic frequency 
sweep oscillator. Tunes 90-32,000 KC 
on fundamental. Variable sweep — 1 
to 40 KC. Internal 400 cycle modula- 
tion or external. 4-inch diameter dial 
— dual ratio vernier. Air trimmer con- 
densers for stability. High R-F output 
of .25 volts. Model 150— net $64.50 
RCA Mfg. Co., Cooper & Front Sts., 
Camden, N. J. — R.\dio Today. — See 
also advt. p. 54. 

Auto radio controls 




■k Line of single unit control heads 
to fit all 1935, '36, '37 auto instrum- 
ment panels. Plates and knobs match 
finish and color of car panel. Rapidly 
installed without cutting of filing — per- 
fect fits. Bulletin 37-A available. Uni- 
versal Controls, Inc., 41-07 40th Ave., 
Long Island City, N. Y. — See also advt. 
p. 60. 

AC line ballast 

* Metal self-regulating line ballasts 
for AC sets of from 5 to 24 tubes. 4- 
prong plug for insertion in receiver. 
Also with plain prongs for use at out- 
let. Practically indestructible — guar- 
anteed 18 months. Maintain steady 
voltage and prevent overload. List $2. 
J. F. D. Mfg. Co., 4111 Ft. Hamilton 
Pky.. Brooklyn, N. Y. — R.\dio Today. 




♦ Line of hermetically sealed can 
type condensers. Dykanol condensers 
are compact and light weight. High 
voltage ratings and negligible power 
factor. Specifications in catalog 135A. 
Cornell-Dubllier Corp., South Plain- 
field, N. J. — R.\Dio Today. — See also 
advt. p. 57. 



All-wave line filter 




*■ Scientifically designed fer elim- 
inating noise interference which comes 
in over the power lines. Has recej)- 
tacle for plug from receiver. List ?3. 
Philmore Mfg. Co., Inc., 115 University 
PI., New York, N. Y.— Radio Today. 



Radio test panel 

^ "■' ■" ■■ ' 



Ig^aR&g^ 




* Complete radio service labora- 
tory. Left section has all-wave signal 
generator— 100-30,000 KC on funda- 
mentals. Output meter in volts and 
watts (when used with built-in test 
speaker). Center section for AC and 
DC testing with separate meters — re- 
sistance, capacity, inductance, leakage, 
volts, current. Right section has uni- 
versal speaker with substitute field, 
DC volt-ammeter for vibrator tests. 
12-inch lumoline bulbs provide diffused 
lighting. Type 652. United Motors 
Service, 3044 Grand Blvd., Detroit, 
Mich. — Radio Today. 



50 



Radio Today 



Constant impedance 
output attenuator 




■*• Power type attenuator with low 
insertion loss — constant impedance. 
Will dissipate 25 watts continuously. 
Used as output level control for power 
amplifiers. Available in 8,15.50,200.250. 
500 ohms impedances. Minimum in- 
sertion loss of 1.3 DB. 15 steps — each 
of 3DB. Type CIA. Clarostat Mfg. 
Co., Inc., 285 N. 6th St., Brooklyn, 
N. Y. — Radio Today. — See also advt. 
p. 64. 

Vocaphone intercommunicator 




■*■ Inter-office system of amplified 
communication. Master unit provides 
instant connection with one to six re- 
mote stations. High amplification per- 
mits pick-up over a great distance. 
Easily operated. Operates from AC and 
DC lines. Miles Reproducer, Inc., 112 
W. 14th St., New York, N. Y.— Radio 
Today. 

Wright-DeCoster speaker 




* 12-inch permanent magnet dy- 
namic speaker. Power handling capa- 
bility of 15 watts. Para-curve dia- 
phragm type covers 50-10,000 cycles. 
Standard diaphragm model has fre- 
quency range 50-6,000 cycles. Water- 



proof cone and solid center spider. En- 
closed type construction protects field 
magnets and output transformer. Type 
1984— list $19.84. Wright-DeCoster, 
Inc., St. Paul, Minn. — R.\dio Today. — 
See also advt. p. 48. 

Red-Head condensers 

* Line of paper and electrolytic 
capacitors. Dry electrolytics in cans, 
wax cartons — multiple and single 
units. Other types are tubular electro- 
lytic, tubular paper, and transmitting 
filters. Red-Head condensers available 
in standard capacitances and voltages. 
Consolidated Wire & Associated Corps., 
512 S. Peoria St., Chicago, 111. — Radio 
Today. 



Line-noise filter 



Time delay relay 




* Motor driven time-delay relay for 
transmitters and other devices which 
require a delay in switching opera- 
tions. Made with delays of 35 seconds 
to 63 minutes. Time adjustable up to 
maximum limit of delay. Uses AC 
synchronus motor — motor disconnected 
after contacts are tripped. Available 
in various switch combinations. List 
$35 — $36 depending upon contact ar- 
rangement. Ward Leonard Electric 
Co., Mt. Vernon. N. Y. — Radio Today. 

Knock-down steel cabinets 




* Black crystallized - finish steel 
cabinets for test equipment and am- 
plifiers. Assembled with self-tapping 
screws. Available in 7 sizes from 9x 
5x6 inches to 18x12x9 inches. Cad- 
mium plated steel chassis available to 
fit in cabinets. Insuline Corp. of Amer- 
ica, 25 Park Place, New York, N. Y. 
— Radio Today. 

AC voltmeters 

* Pocket size line of voltmeters 
and ammeters. Permaloy moving vane 
— magnetic damping — shielded from 
stray magnetic fields. Knife edge 
pointer and mirror scale. Textolite 
case 5% x 3% x 2 inches. Accuracy 
within 1 per cent — range selector switch 
on multi-range instruments. Model 
AS-5 — range 0/150/300 volts AC —list 
$42.50. General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. — Radio Today 




* Popular-priced line filter housed 
in round polished aluminum casing 
with standard receptacle and ground 
binding post. Has rubber-covered cord. 
Effective in broadcast and short-wave 
band— 50 DB attenuation. Type 104 — 
list $4. Technical Appliance Corp., 17 
E. 16th St., New York, N. Y.— Radio 
Today. 

Triumph signal generator 




* All-wave signal generator from 
100 to 27,000 KG on direct calibrated 
harmonics. Modulation — 30 per cent 
at 400 cycles — or external. Max. output 
of .2 volt for AFC work. Practically 
zero output when attenuator is set at 
minimum. Calibrated output from 1 
to 50,000 microvolts. 6C6 oscillator 
with suppressor grid modulation. 
Black metal case — AC operation. 
Model 120— net $23.95. Triumph Mfg. 
Co., 4017 W. Lake St., Chicago, 111.— 
Radio Today. — See also advt. p. 61. 

Acoustic vari-deflector 

* Speaker baffle with adjustable 
louvres for directing sound coverage. 
Simplifies problem of adequate indoor 
covering by providing a control of di- 
rection of sound projection — mounts 
horizontally or vertically. Internal 
acoustic treatment eliminates reso- 







nances. Houses speakers up to 13-inch 
cone diameter — max. depth 9-inches. 
List $12.50. Atlas Sound Corp., 1451 
39th St., Brooklyn, N. Y.— Radio To- 
day. 



February, 1937 



51 




1937-1938 



RADIO 



SERVICE 



YEAR BOOK 



INCLUDING 

RADIO TRADE DIRECTORY 



Also 
i. f peaks - - rma color 
coding data . tube oper. 
ating voltages . . socket 
analysis similarity 

of tube types, etc. 



WITH 1-YEAR 
SUBSCRIPTION 
to RADIO TODAY 




Actual Size, 9 x 12 inches 

TWO great helps in the big year ahead ! You will want them both — 
need them both. The help you will get will be like "Pennies. . . . 
No, Dollars! . . . from Heaven." 

The Year Book, now in production, is yours — absolutely FREE — with 
a one-year subscription to RADIO TODAY. And the subscription 
price is only ONE dollar. 

Twelve monthly issues of the industry's outstanding business paper ! 
They will give you a terse and timely picture of all radio events and 
trends affecting your business, PLUS many special service features that 
will help you to make more money in radio's greatest year. 

The Radio Service Year Book & Radio Trade Directory is an annual 
compilation of material greatly needed by dealers, service men, parts 
jobbers and manufacturers. It includes radio's only trade directory, with 
classified list of products and manufacturers. 

Among the features of the Year Book are : Tables of I. F. Peaks ; RMA 
Color Coding Data; Specifications of Servicing Instruments; Diagrams 
showing Socket Analyses, Tube Operating Voltages, Similarity in Tube 
Types, etc. 

To take advantage of this unusual free offer, all you need to do is fill 
out and mail the card herewith. Your subscription will start at once. 
Then, just as soon as the Year Book is published (now in production), 
your copy will be sent to you post haste. 

MAIL THE CARD TODAY AND MAKE SURE 



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Radio Today 




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TRADE FLASHES 



* Messrs. J. H. Hopwood, R. Esh- 
man, W. H. Hajrward and D. B. 
Keller have been named special field 
representatives for Fairbanks-Morse. 
This move on the part of FM, ac- 
cording to W. Paul Jones, home ap- 
pliance division general manager, is 
part of the FM 1937 program; duties 
of the four new reps will be to aid 
jobbers in applying sales plans and 
to adapt the national program to 
local conditions. 

* Ralph C. Cameron has been 
named as manager for the depart- 
ment store sales division of the ap- 
pliance and merchandising dept. of 
GE. He has been active with GE 
for the past 7 years; for some time 
he has directed dept. store activity 
in kitchen appliances, and now will 
supervise sales for radios and all 
household appliances. 

* In its new building at 3997 
Perkins Ave., Cleveland, Ohio, the 
BiTish Development Co. will triple 
its present capacity, according to 
A. I/. Williams, president of the firm. 
New and Improved plant equipment 
in also part of the expansion set-up. 

* New vice-president in charge 
of engineering and production for 
Standard Transformer Corp., Chi- 
cago, is Everett E. Gramer. With the 
Stancor organization since 19 30, Mr. 
Gramer had previously spent 2 years 
with Transformer Corp. of America. 
As Stancor's chief engineer before 
the current promotion, Gramer be- 
came interested in sales promotion 
in the Chicago area. 

* AudiVision, a division of 
TradeWays, Inc., 2 85 Madison Ave., 
N. Y. C, has recently produced new 
talking slide-films for both RCA and 
General Electric. Pictures in the 
appliance section of RADIO TODAY 
for January were taken from new 
GE films; this month AudiVision has 
supplied photos from RCA's picture, 
"The Triple Play," presented under 
the title, "Tubes As Sales Wedges." 
Currently interested in radio promo- 
tion is TradeW- ys' popular vice- 
president, Bernaid AVeitzer. 



WHEN YOU 

REPLACE 

RADIO SHAFTS 

USE ONLY 



muk 




FLEXIBLE SHAFTS 
and CASINGS 



and here are the reasons why 

They're specially designed and built for 
radio application. 

They're standard original equipment 
on practically all makes of auto radios. 

They provide smooth, sensitive tuning, 
without "stiff" spots or "jumping." 

They assure satisfied customers — and 
that means more business for you. 



•BE SURE to ask your jobber 
for genuine S. S. WHITE 
Shafts and Casings. 

The S. S. WHITE 

DENTAL MFG. CO. 
INDUSTRIAL DIVISION 

10 East 40th Street, Room 2310T 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 




AUTO RADIO 

REMOTEOCABLE 

REPLACER 




With the Remote-0-Cable Replacer, a supply of shafting and casing, 
same as used by leading manufacturers and an assortment of fittings, 
you can immediately deliver any length or type or Auto Radio Con- 
trol Cable. Properly connect any auto radio to any dashboard head. 



a 



jobber. 



distributors and serviccmc 



nil particular 



J. F. D. MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

4111 Fort Hamilton Parkway Brooklyn, N. Y. 




February, 1937 



53 



HAILED BY 
"SOUND" DEALERS 

THE HIT OF 
THE SEASON 




BEAUTIFUL 
CABINETS 

VEHY 
SENSITIVE 



TYPE OC-2 

WEBSTER - CHICAGO'S New '^'^^^% 
INTER-OFFICE COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS 

TYPE OC-2 is the two station system. Operates on either 
A.C. or D.C. 110 volts. System consists of two amplifier units, 
each being housed in an attractive cabinet with ebony finish. 
Separate volume control for adjusting to any degree of loud- 
ness. Unit is very sensitive and ordinary conversation can 
be picked up across the desk. Free from hum or noise, and 
conversation is entirely private. 

TYPE OCM is the multiple system for any number of 
stations up to ten. A selector switch permits picking any 
station for private conversation. Housed in identical cabinet 
to Type OC-2, and has the same features of construction, 
including operation on either A.C. or D.C. 110 Volt. 

SPECIAL DEALER SALES HELPS 

This looks like the big money maker of 1937 for agressive 
Radio dealers. Webster - Chicago has prepared an attractive 
mailing piece that will help open doors for you. Don't miss 
this opportunity. Get started now. Write for full information. 



\ 



WEBSTER-CHICAGO 

Mautifnctnres a complete line of sound equip- 
n-.ent and accessories including; factory call sys- 
sehool systems, theatre equipn:ent, etc. 




RCA TEST EQUIPMENT 

. . at prices every service engineer can afford 



This new Test Equipment offers many new features. Designed 
by RCA engineers to make your job simpler, faster and more 
precisely efficient. Ideal for visual alignment, vibrator testing, 
checking modulation, distortion and all other general oscil- 
lographic applications. 

Check the features! Consider how helpful this equipment 
can be to you. Then get it and put it to work ! 




FEATURES 

1 COMPLETE oscillograph using new RCA-913 Cathode 
Ray Tube — ready for every service application. 

2 High Sensitivity — 1.75 volts (RMS) for full-scale deflection. 

3 Vertical and horizontal amplifiers — Individual gain con- 
trols—Flat 30-10,000 cycles. 

4 Linear Timing Axis — Range 30-10,000 cycles. 

5 Small spot diameter, sharp focus — Individual centering 
controls on front panel. 

6 Removable light shield — Excludes room light and gives in- 
tense image. Calibration screen provided. 

7 A-C operated — Input power, 50 watts. 

8 Ruggedly built — Snap-out leather handle— Symmetrical ap- 
pearance for use with new Test Oscillator. New two-tone gray, 
wrinkle finish with highly polished nickel silver etched panel. 




FEATURES 

1 Variable electronic sweep (no moving parts) — 1 to 40 kcs. 
— at any R-F or I-F frequency — Sweep rate, 120 times per sec- 
ond — eliminates screen flicker — air trimmers for all bands. 

2 No amplitude modulation with frequency modulation. 
Horizontal sweep frequency linear across screen. 

3 Wide frequency range — 90 kcs. to 32,000 kcs. — fundamen- 
tal frequencies — 400 cycle internal modulation — JACK FOR 
EXTERNAL MODULATION. 

4 Large direct reading dial — 4 inches diameter — indirect il- 
lumination — two vernier ratios, 2:1 and 5:1. 

5 High r-f output — 0.25 volts at all frequencies — negligible 

leakage — three-step attenuator plus contin- 
uously variable control. 



FOR PROFIT 

RCA Manufacturing Co., Inc., Camden, N. J. 
A Service of the Radio Corporation of America 



54 



Radio Today 



AMPLIFIER OPERATION— SERVICE 

(.Continued from page 28) 

load resistance which is very low — 
actually equal to the internal tube 
resistance. ^STote how much longer 
the upper part of the line is for a 
positive swing of the grid voltage 
than the negative. Plenty of distor- 
tion would result from such operation. 

High load resistance 

The light line represents a very 
high value. of load resistance. Since 
with this value the operation of the 
tube is limited to rather high values 
of instantaneous plate currents, the 
effects of curvature of the character- 
istics at low plate currents are 
avoided, thereby reducing distortion. 

For a voltage amplifier a high plate 
resistance is desirable. Note that for 
a 50-volt grid swing with the 
high resistance load that the plate 
voltage swing Epujgx minus Epj^ji^ 
is greater — in other words more volt- 
age is obtainable from the amplifier 
for higher values of load resistance. 

Just how the load resistance affects 
power output and voltage output or 
amplification is another desirable 
thing to know. Assuming an ideal 
amplifier tube with a constant plate 
resistance, we can theorize using a 
circuit such as Fig. 6. Here we have 
the plate resistance ^p (impedance) 
in series with the load resistance ^-L. 
A generator feeds a voltage into the 
series combination — the value of this 
voltage is mu x Egjg -^vhere mu is 
the amplificator factor and ^sig the 
signal applied to the grid of the tube. 



Oil hand one would expect to ■ get 
10 times as much voltage out of an 
amplifier as was put in if the ampli- 
ficator factor of the tube were 10. 
But such is not the case, since the 
plate impedance and load resistance 
are in series. If the plate and load 
resistance are equal, one half of the 
available voltage is across the load 
and half across the tube itself — 
therefore the actual amplification ob- 
tainable from the stage is 5 instead 
of 10. The reason for this is that 
the voltage divides across the two 
resistances in proportion to the re- 
sistance values. 

Amplifier gain 

Fig. 7 shows the variation of gain 
with load resistance. To realize any- 
where near the full amplification ca- 
pability of the tube, it is necessary 
to use resistance values equal to 10 
or more times the internal tube re- 
sistance. 

In Fig. 8 a similar plot is made 
for a screen grid tube having an am- 
plification factor of 1500 — practically 
it is possible to realize only a small 
fraction of this amplification since 
the internal resistance of a screen 
grid tube is on the order of 1 to 1.5 
megs. However, even with a rela- 
tively low load resistance it is pos- 
sible to get very great amplification 
from the tube. 

As was pointed out before, and il- 
lustrated in Fig. 5, a high value of 
load resistance gives a greater volt- 
age output (or amplification) for a 
given signal input. 




Lecture and demonstration board developed ty RCA to be used in explaining the 
operation of amplifiers. Circuits shown are actually wired up behind the sche- 
matic. A cathode ray oscillograph is used to illustrate the effect of varying the 
circuit parameters — and switches are used to cut-in and short various condensers 
and resistors. A number of these demonstrators icill be used throughout the coun- 
try in RCA's neiv series of service lectures commencing immediately. 




Exact Duplicate 
VOLUME CONTROLS 

ic Composition-element units for higher ohm- 
ages and intricate tapers. 

i^ Wire-wound units for moderate ohmages and 
higher current-handling requirements. 

i^ Backed by most complete listing of set re- 
quirements. A matched unit for every re- 
placement. Positively no improvision ! 

Free DATA: ^^^^ for latest bni- 

letiu on volnme con- 
trol replaeeiuents. Also chart of metal- 
tube resistor reijlacemeiits. 



CLAROSTAT 



n"| anS >or<h Mi.^111 s». 
.^•^ Ilrooklvn, X. Y. 



"\ FIXED HER RADIO - 

What'll I do now ? " 

-(^ m 




Naturally you first restock your 
service kit so that you will have 
Ward Leonard Resistors for your 
next job. Ward Leonard Resis- 
tors have always been dependable 
and their ratings conservative. 
The service man finds they pay 
because the work he does with 
them is satisfactory. Send for 
bulletin and price list. 

WARD LEONARD 
ELECTRIC COMPANY 

40 SOUTH ST., MOUNT VERNO:\, N. Y. 

Please send me your Bulletin 507A. 



Name 

Address 

City 

Jobber's Name. 



February, 1937 



55 




THE common sense aerial for steel top automobiles. 
Puts the aerial OVER THE TOP where it belongs. 
Outstanding performance, plus keen streamlined appear- 
ance — highly polished aerial — semi-round — die formed 
like decorative body trim — MOUNTED ON TOP OF rub- 
ber vacuum posts — carries center trim line of hood, 
windshield, and rear window right over top of car. Ex- 
tremely efficient — not damaged by weather — works in rain, 
ice and snow anywhere, anytime. Steel ^ ^ q _ 
car top shields against interference from ^ ^ o ^ 
ignition and lighting. Easy to install 4m list 
— shipped straight, no kinks — no holes cgi n BY 
to drill in top — easy on car finish. Smart , iVniij/- 
appearance — greater volume — more distance LEADINw 
— and reduced noise. JOBBERS 

WEDGE MANUFACTURING CO. 
2338 S. Michigan Avenue, Chicago 



SERVICE NOTES 

There is a basic electrical law which 
states that the power output of a de- 
vice is maximum when the external 
load resistance is equal to the inter- 
nal (plate) resistance. So for maxi- 
mum power output, the external load 
should equal the plate resistance. But 
for single-tube amplifiers, this value 
cannot be used because it introduces 
excessive distortion as was pointed 
out for Fig. 5. Practical applica- 
tions for triodes dictate a load resist- 
ance equal to at least twice the plate 
resistance. While the power output 
is decreased slightly, the distortion 
is greatly reduced. 

Pentode amplifiers 

Pentode power tubes offer an en- 
entirely different problem than tri- 
odes. In Fig. 9 is a set of curves 
for a pentode tube (a type 47). Note 
how they differ from those of the tri- 
ode. Two load resistances are drawn 
on this chart — one whose value is 
equal to the internal plate resistance 
of the tube. The second one with a 
steeper slope is the value usually em- 
ployed (heavy line). 

If we again take P as the operat- 
ing point and a maximum voltage 



CANDOHMS 

ZIPOHMS 

SWITCHES 

SPIRASHIELDS 

BRIDGES 

DECADE BOXES 



MUTBR FUBH 



JACK SCANLAN 
PETE DAILEY 



FLOYD CHURCHILL 
LES MUTER FRED STEVENS 



DEPENDABLE 
QUALITY 

AND 
RELIABLE 
SERVICE 
ALWAYS 



TWS- 15- CHICAGO ILL 3:15 PM 

JOBBERS - DEALERS - SERVICEMEN 

NEW MUTER ZIPOHMS REPLACEMENT RESISTORS 
GOING TO TOWN STOP HAVE YOU RECEIVED NEW 
ZIPOHM CATALOG AND PROPOSITION IF NOT 
SCREAM AND YOU WILL HEAR FROM US STOP 
KEEP THE CASH REGISTER JINGLING COMMA 
SELL MUTER PARTS 

THE MUTER COMPANY 



THE MUTER COMPANY 1255 S.MICHIGAN AVE., CHICAGO, ILL 




In city areas noise elimination is a 
profitable source of income. This 
N.Y. shop finds sandwich-board ad- 
vertising OK. 

swing of 15.3 we have the maximum 
and minimum instantaneous grid 
voltages ^cl equal and 30.5 as the 
limits of operation on the 7000 ohm 
line. 

But considering the 60,000 ohm 
line, it is evident that the left hand 
section X-P is much less than the 
right hand P-Y for a grid swing of 
16.3 volts. Plenty of distortion is 
the result. The reason is that the 
curves all bunch together at the left 
hand part of the curve. Point X is 
on the diagram, but Y is actually 
way out to the right off the illustra- 
tion. With the pentode power am- 
plifier, under-biasing will result in 
distortion of the upper part of the 
current wave due to the plate cur- 
rent characteristics being squeezed 
together. Over-biasing will also pro- 
duce distortion as in the triode am- 
plifier. ISTote how in Fig. 9 as the bias 
is increased, the lines come closer to- 
gether for equal differences in bias. 
This is a source of distortion as much 
as curved characteristics are. 

In both triode and pentode R-F 
and I-F amplifiers, the bias and load 
resistance considerations are far less 
important than in audio stages since 
the applied signal voltages are usually 
very small. Ordinarily the load re- 
sistance is made as high as possible 
for maximum gain — and the tube 
biased to such a point that linear op- 
eration is obtained over a small re- 



56 



Radio Today 





IS IT T^Xa^^^HiuH^ PROFITS^^g^^ 
CUSTOMER SATISFACTION YOU'RE 
LOOKING FOR? IF SO 

Seldom, if ever, do new and startling improvements 
in the field of scientific research come overnight. 
They are, rather, the fruit of patient, painstaking 
effort. Likewise, the building of a reputation is a 
slow, tortuous process. Here at Cornell-Dubilier, we 
are ever conscious of our obligation to the radio and 
electrical industries, and of the ideals of the founders 
of this great organization, established more than 
twenty-seven years ago ! 

Your every condenser requirement can be filled 
promptly and efficiently. Tor more profits educate 
Your customers on the 

,, , f CD Condensers 

Value oi ^-^ ^ 

World's largest exclusive manufacfurers of condensers 

PAPER - MICA - DYKANOL - WET & DRY ELECTROLYTIC 

Complete Descriptive Catalog Material Free on Request. 

CORNELL-DUBILIER CORPORATION 
1022 Hamilton Blvd., So. Plainfield, N. J. 




11 







500 OHMS 
^ VOLT/ 



new HIGH in 
Sensitivity and Value 

At 20 000 ohms per volt, thia 
new Simpson Set Tester is 
the most remarkable value 
ever offered to the service 
man. Negligible current con- 
sumption means accurate D. C. voltage readings of 2.S — 10 — 50— 
25&— 1000. Same ranges for A. C. at 1000 ohms per volt. Cur- 
rent readings from 1 microamp to 500 milliamps. Accurate 
resistance readings as low as 1 ohm up to 40 megohmi. Ask for 
new circular covering wide range of tests. 

Model 250 (20,000 ohms per volt model)— Net Price. . $38i50 

Time price: S8.00 down and 6 monthly payments of SS.85 each 

Model 225 (10,000 ohms per volt model)— Net Price $29.50 

Time price: S6.00 down and 6 monthly payments of $4.50 each 

Illuminated Dial Tube Tester 

Checks all tubes under individual load 
conditions utilizing latest authoritative 
circuit. Tube quality shown on illu- 
minated scale. Separate scales for 
"Diodes" and 0-100 percentage scale 
for matching tubes. Spare sockets pro- 
vide for future tube changes. Has 
neon-tube short check. A beautiful in- 
strument that boosts tube sales. 
Model 222 Tube Tester — Counter or ffQA EA 

portable type— Net Price «tf«iiOU 

Time price: S8.00 down and 6 monthly payments of $6.20 each 

"Roto-Ranger" Tube and Set Tester 

"Roto-Ranger" feature places . twelve 
distinct scales at finger tips. Utilizes 
latest tube testing circuit. Has filament 
return selector. Tests all types con- 
densers on separate scales. Has sepa- 
rate resistance scales of 100 ohms, 
100,000 ohms, 100 megohms. Three 
D. C. scales of 8—300—1000 Volts. 
(2500 Ohms per Volt.) ©BT AO 

Model 220— Net Price 90 liUU 

Time Price: $11.40 down and 6 monthly payments of $8.75 each 

"Roto-Ranger" Volt-Ohm Milliammeter 

Incorporates Simpson "Roto-Ranger" fea- 
ture with twelve separate scales cover- 
ing all ranges for practical servicing. 
Model 201 with D. C. ranges only: Net 

Price $29.50 

Time Price: $6.00 down and 6 monthly 
payments of S4.50 each 

Model 202 (A. C.-D. C. type) : Net Price $32.50 

Time Price: $6.50 down and 6 monthly payments of 55.00 each 







SIMPSON 

RADIO INSTRUMENTS 
AND SERVICE EQUIPMENT 




COUPON BRINGS FACTS 



n No. 202 



Simpson Electric Co., 5216 W. Kinzie St., Chicago 
Send bulletin describing models checked. 

□ No. 250 a No. 225 □ No. 222 G Nj. 220 Q No. 201 

□ Send deferred payment application. 

Name. . . 

Addrsss — — 



February, 1937 



57 





Exact 
Duplicate 
REPLACEMENTS 

i^ Condensers precisely matched electrically, me- 
chanically, visually, with original equipment 
replaced. 

• FIT right. LOOK right. WORK right — the 
only way to do a real servicing job. 

if Yet they cost no more than a makeshift collec- 
tion of standard condensers — and usually lots 
less for material and labor. 

■^.The one sure way to please fussy customers 
and getting paid promptly. No return calls. 
No arguments. A nice, clean, quick profit. 

Send for CATALOG : c o n t a i n s 

several 
pages of exact-duplicate condenser listings, as 
well as other condensers and resistors of the 
complete AEROVOX line. 



FKvvm 



CORPORATION 

70 Washington Si : ". Brooklyn, N. Y. 



SERVICE NOTES 



giou — extremely large signals are sel- 
dom if ever handled in these stages. 
From this discussion the impor- 
tance of proper operating conditions 
is obvious. What the suggested val- 
ues are for various tubes is obtain- 
able from the various tube manuals 
published by the leading tube manu- 
facturers. While most set manufac- 
turers adhere quite close to suggested 
operating characteristics, it is pos- 
sible to use many other values and 
obtain satisfactory results provided 
that all factors are properly taken 
into account. But in any case, the 
basic operation and principles of the 
amplifiers are the same. 

STANDARD I. F. PEAK 

* E.M.A. Standards Section is 
now working on a plan to standardize 
an I.F. peak for superheterodyne re- 
ceivers. Idea is to get all new receiv- 
ers on a single frequency where in- 
ference wiU be minimum — it is also 
expected that the FCC will take steps 
to minimize commercial transmis- 
sions on the standard I.F. peak and 
in general protect that frequency. 



OPERADIO QUALITY MEANS DOLLARS TO YOU 

The name OPERADIO has always meant good sound equipment . . . high- 
grade dependable merchandise, reasonably priced. That means dollars 
and cents to you ... a good profit, quick turnover and no costly 
calling back on the customer to fix equipment that has broken 
down. When you buy sound or P.A. equipment BUY 



UNIT- MATCHED EQUIPMENT 



All equipment is unit- 
matched" to insure a fine, 
w^ell - rounded performance; 
and each piece is marked 
with the name "OPERADIO" 
■ . . your g-uarnntee of the 
best sound equipment that 
money can buy at a price no 
more than the ordinary. 

The Operadio line is un- 
equalled for completeness 
. . . including public address 
systems, speakers, amplifiers, 
paging systems, microphones, 
all component parts and ac- 
cessories. Especially popular 
and profitable is the MODEL 
111 AMPLIFIER PAGIXG 
SYSTEM (illustrated). 

Send in your name to receive cata- 
logs and a free copy of 
THE SOUND ADVISOR. 
Address Dept. RT. 

OPERADIO 

MANUFACTURING CO. 

ST. CHARLES, ILLINOIS 




Model in Amplifier Pagring System 

A complete paging system for factories, hotels, pub- 
lic buildings, theatre dressing rooms and similar 
places. This system is equipped to use up to 12 
speakers and comes complete with contact crystal 
microphone mounted on a beautiful stand, a special 
amplifier with its tubes which mounts on the wall 
at some convenient place near the microphone, a 
foot switch for use when talking, and a complement 
of 4 permanent magnet dynamic speakers in attrac- 
tive steel wall cabinet. 



Serviceman's angle of the standard 
I.F. peak is that all future sets can 
be aligned at a single frequency — 
perhaps a stable and accurate crystal 
oscillator will be developed for that 
purpose. Present E.M.A. plans lean 
to an adoption of 455 KG as the 
standard I.F. peak. 

DRYING OUT SETS 

* Those inexipensive hair-dryers 
with a heating unit and blower are 
excellent devices for drying out damp- 
radios. Constant change of air takes 
away the moisture rapidly and the 
heat increases the speed of evapora- 
tion. 

When reclaiming the water-soaked 
sets in the flood area it ia essential 
that the receivers be thoroughly dried 
out; otherwise application of power 
is likely to bum out many parts that 
might be workable when dry. 

If any large number of sets are to 
be dried out at once, a small room 
that can be overheated by the regular 
heating system is ideal. However, the 
air must be changed frequently to 
carry away the water vapor. An oven 
might possibly be employed if care is 
taken not to melt the wax out of con- 
densers and transformers — a change 
of air must be provided for. 

E. G. Sceli of Radio Inspection 
Service Co., Hartford, Conn., says the 
following about repairing flood-dam- 
aged sets based on last year's ex- 
perience : 

"I don't believe we repaired over 
six of them. The majority of them 
were in such a condition that repairs 
would have been foolish. However, 
a few machines which were promptly 
put in an oven and baked out after 
the waters receded, came out very 
well with merely minor repairs such 
as replacing electrolytic condensers 
and one or two resistors. 

"The trouble seemed to be that most 
of the cabinets were completely 
wrecked, and if you have ever seen 
a veneered cabinet after it has been 
wet, you wouldn't wonder why peo- 
ple didn't want to do anything about 
it." 

* Vest pocket booklet carrying a con- 
densed discussion of the elimination of 
man-made interference may be ob- 
tained from Continental Carbon, Inc., 
13900 Lorain Ave., Cleveland, Ohio. 
Bulletin is illustrated and has 24 
pages; price is 10 cents postpaid. 

* Catalog No. 15, titled "Rheostats, 
Resistors and Tap Switches for the 
Radio, Industrial and Electronic 
Fields," has been issued by Ohmite 
Mfg. Co., 4835 Flournoy St., Chicago, 
111., and will be sent free upon request. 



58 



Radio Today 




Second front the ris^ht . . . 

lies CONTINENTAL Carbon's new M-5 bakelite insulated 
500 milliwatt straijlit-line resistor; quiet, moisture-proof, easy 
to handle, not deteriorated by solderins iron temperatures, 
small and yet every bit as dependable within its rating as the 
large ceramic insulated resistors pioneered over Four years ago 
by CONTINENTAL! You'll need the M-5 for auto set 
repairs. Now stocked in all standard values. List price, 17c. See 
<;vOo your jobber for net prices. 

MFS1, the Master Filternoys Selector, is a 
handy salesman for CONTINENTAL Filter- 
noys suppressors! Indicates the correct method 
of blocking 90% of the ordinary forms of man- 
made interference. 
List price, complete $11.25 




^Continental Carbon IncM 



13910 Lorain Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio • Toronto, Canada 
Send 10c for your copy of "Handy Pocket Data on Radio Interference." 



TO DEALERS AND SERVICEMEN 



TRIAD RADIO TUBE 

FREE! 




THIS COUPON 
WORTH $1.25 



I TRIAD MANUFACTURING CO., Inc. 
|Dept. A-11 Pawtucket, R. I. 

I Sure I'll try Triads. Send me Free Tube Certificate , 
good fur $1.25. Also FREE Engineering Data Chart. 

I Name 

I Address 

I Town 



^Stale_ 



I Jobber's Name_ 



'THE QUALITY NAME IN RADIO TUBES" 




Don't ganilile >vitli ordinary parts -when 
there iss :i UTAH preciselj" engineerecl for the 
job. 

The radio industry has depended upon 
UTAH for 15 years. They know each UTAH 
part is an opportunity to deliver extraordinary 
performance — ^vithoiit paying a premium 
price. 

In making' your joh easier and more profit- 
able, UTAH goes another step — your inventory 
is simplified. With just a small investment in 
UTAH parts, you can establish a reputation 
for prompt service, with tailor-made parts. 

UTAH Speakers, ever since broadcasting be- 
gan, have been building good will-^a reputa- 
tion on which yoii can capitalize ivith but a 
small investment. \Vith the UTAH line you 
can service AXT make and model of radio re- 
ceiver, 

UTAH Vibrators . . . UTAH is responsible 
for practically every major improvement on vi- 
brators. Instead of 90 auto radio vibrators* 
UTAH jobbers do a perfect job with only 24 — 
Just one example of your savings with UTAH. 

Check over the UTAH parts belo^T. Be sure 
of customer goodwill and maximum profits. 

Standardize on UTAH! 



• VIBRATORS 

• TRANSFORMERS 

• CHOKES 

• VOLUME CONTROLS 

• TONE CONTROLS 

• SPEAKERS 



RESISTORS 
PLUGS 
JACKS 

JACK SWITCHES 

PUSH BUTTON 

SWITCHES 



UTAH RADIO PRODUCTS CO. 

CHICAGO, U.S.A. 
TORONTO BUENOS AIRES 

ONTARIO, CANADA (UCOA RADIO PRODUCTS CO.) 



15 YEARS OF LEADERSHIP' 



February, 1937 



59 




Check these 
Profit Features 



bly. No loose 
parts. 

• No catting 
of dash. No 
visible screws. 

• Escutcheon 
plates to 
match all 

panels. Col- 
or-matched 



• Automat 
dial adjas 
ment. 

• Minimu 

stock fc 



UNIVERSAL 
FITS ALL/ 

AT LAST — a remote control unit 
that fits all car sets and all car models 
(1 935 - 36-37). UN IVERSALS 
give you this simplicity and stock 
economy. Now you can handle 
reinstallation jobs quicker, better 
and more profitably. 

Pre-Assembled 1 

You save time with UNI- 
VERSAL'S single-unit con- 
struction. Each control unit 
comes to you completely 
assembled. Mail the coupon 
today for the whole story! 

REPRESENTATIVES: 

A few sood territories still 
open. Write us! 



conTROL5, inc. 

[21 -07 40th Ave, Depi. C, 
LoflS Island City, N. Y. 
Please send without obligation your descriptive cir 
cular about the new, patented Uniytnal Conliols. 
Name 
Address - 




DYNAMIC 
MICROPHONES 

ARi IHCIteASINO 
IN POPULARITY 




because they 

— have greater sensitivity 

— are free from inductive pickup 

— have no background noise 

— can work v?ith long lines 

— are sturdiest ever produced 

— are weatherproof 

— are small in size 

— are reasonable in price 

We solicit requests for special sound and 

amplifying equipment. 

Send for our latest Bulletin 3013 

We arc pleased to send this to you. 

RADIO RECEPTOR CO., Inc. 

110 SEVENTH AVE., NEW YORK, N. Y. 



BOOKS FOR THE SERVICEMAN 



MAUOHY-TteSSr RADIO SEHVICE ENCYCLOPEDI. 





CONTROL 




CONDENSERS 


VIBRATORS 


Trp« a Tub 


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SwitOi Biu -Nmi 


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50 




Greatly reduced reproduction of pages in Mallory- Yaxley Radio Service Encyclopedia. 



RADIO AMATEUR'S HANDBOOK 

Compiled by American Radio Relay League 

* 1937 edition of the A.E.E.L. 
Handbook has been increased in size 
and brought up to date — practically 
all of the chapters have been re- 
written. 

Book deals mainly with amateur 
radio from the theoretical, construc- 
tion, and operating angles. There is 
a wealth of data on short-wave re- 
ceivers, transmitters, vacuum tubes, 
and antennas. Ultra-high frequencies 
above 60 megacycles are discussed 
along with construction data for suit- 
able equipment. 

The serviceman will find much data 
of value — it will help him understand 
the principles of radio receivers and 
transmitters. 

Book is priced at $1 in U.S.A. — 
paper covers. Published by American 
Radio Relay League, W. Hartford, 
Conn. — R.ADio Tod.\y 



RADIO SERVICE ENCYCLOPEDIA 

Compiled by P. R. Mallory & Co., Inc. 

* Newest book prepared especially 
for the serviceman is the Mallory- 
Taxley Encyclopedia. This volume 
gives complete service data on more 
than 12,000 receiver models — given in 
99 pages of tables — sample heading re- 
produced herewith. In one listing it 
gives volume control, tone control, 
filter condensers, vibrator, and trans- 
former data, together with reference 
to circuits employed. I.F. peaks are 
given for the superhets. 

Latter half of book is devoted to 
easily understood technical descrip- 
tions of circuits, measuring and test- 



ing devices, antennas, auto radio in- 
terference, alignment, AFC, proper 
replacement of various parts. 

JvTineteen pages are devoted to tube 
data. Decibel tables, resistance and 
reactance charts, transformer design 
data are also included. 

This is without doubt the most 
complete compilation of data ever pre- 
sented to the service trade — it has the 
advantage that only one book is now 
required in place of many. Its price 
is nominal — listing at $2.50 at your 
jobbers. Published by P. R. Mallory 
& Co., Inc., Indianapolis, lud. — 
Radio Today 

KINK-AIDS . 

* Collection of clearly indexed 
and filed service "kinks" or case his- 
tories. Feature of compilation is that 
data is printed on 3 x 5 filing cards 
and filed alphabetically by set name 
and model. 

Revised 1937 edition gives informa- 
tion for more than 3,500 different 
models. Contained in a steel cabinet. 
Complete — $1.95. 1937 supplement 
for those who have 1936 edition — 35 
cents. Published by Akrad Products 
Co., 362 Wooster Ave., Akron, Ohio— 
Radio Today 

■*• Presented to servicemen free of 
charge is a new booklet titled "101 
Radio Troubles and Their Cures," is- 
sued by Readrite Meter "Works, Bluff- 
ton, Ohio. Pamphlet was compiled by 
Ranger-Examiner engineers to help 
solve the more common reception prob- 
lems. 

■*• Champion Radio Works, Lynn, 
Mass., will now furnish on request a 
new specification chart covering "G" 
glass tubes, presented in compact 
form. 



60 



Radio Todax 







"With these handy 
new Sprague Univer- 
sal Replacement Conden- 
sers you are ready for quick, 
accurate service on hundreds of 
different radios: 
'^TYPE BT-100 . . . (Rectangular 
-8 leads) has three 8 mfd. sections 
(8-8-8, 200 volts) also two 5 mfd. sections 
(5-5, 25 volts). Gives you many needed 
combinations such as 8-16 ; 12-16 ; 10-16 ; 
5-20, etc., etc. 5 mfd. sections may be used 
as single 10 mfd. List Price $2.50, Net $1.50. 
•^TYPE ST-10 . . . Same as BT-100 ex- 
cept in rectangular cardboard casing with 
mounting lugs. List Price $2.50. Net $1.50. 
"TYPE BT-1 . . . Three sections 5-10- 
25 mfd., all 150 volts) six leads give you 
any needed combination of these capacities. 
List Price $1.95, Net $1.17. 

"See them at your jobbers . . . Write for 
Catalog." 

SPRAGUE PRODUCTS CO., North Adams, Mass. 



NEW BOOKLETS 



* To be obtained from National 
Union tube distributors is a new book- 
let listing most of the tubes brought 
out in the past 3 years with a limited 
description of each. 

■*■ A line of Hi-Q parts for critical 
radio circuits and assemblies, is illus- 
trated and described in a new bulletin 
just issued by Boonton Radio Corp., 
Boonton, N. J. Copy may be had by 
addressing the firm. 

* Illustrated manual on "The Me- 
chanics of Instantaneous Acetate Re- 
cording" has been published by Radio- 
tone Recording Co., 6103 Melrose 
Ave., Hollywood, Calif. Material ap- 
plies to all recording apparatus on the 
market; author is Sam W. Hawver. 

* For Frigidaire dealers is a new 
.'1937 Spring Plan Book," dealing with 
all the new elements of merchandis- 
ing the new line. Elaborate booklet 
carries 3 blank pages to be filled in 
as "Planned Selling" schedules for 
February, March and April. 

* Available upon request is a new 
catalog of public address products just 
published by Atlas Sound Corp., 1451 
39th St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

* Booklet titled "Handy Pocket 
Data on Radio Interference Elimina- 
tion" is a new item from Continental 
Carbon. Inc., 13900 Lorain Ave., Cleve- 
land. Ohio. Cover says 10 cents. 




"I£ you were to 
visit us here in North 
Adams you'd be amazed 
at the thousands of condenser 
types we are making regularly. 
As a matter of fact, there is hardly 
a radio receiver manufacturer of any 
size who isn't using Sprague Condensers 
today. That's why our list of exact dupli- 
cate condenser replacements is so amazingly 
complete — why you can call on us for any 
condenser you'll ever need in radio amateur 
or service replacement work. Round, square, 
dry or wet, special shapes, special mount- 
ings, unusual types — no matter what your 
requirements, we can supply 'em. 
"Try Sprague First!" 

Sincerely, ^tji*^ -^^^i^C^ 

/ 5al« Mono9«f, 

SPRAGUE PRODUCTS CO., North Adams, Mass. 



Don't Take Unnecessary Chances 
Trying to ''Get by'' Without 




Volume 


Price 


Covering 


1 — 


$7.50 — 


1920-31 


II — 


6.50 — 


1931-32 


111 — 


7.50 — 


1932-33 


IV — 


7.50 — 


1933-34 


V — 


7.50 — 


1934-35 


VI — 


7.50 — 


1935-36 



Vol. Vil — 1600 pages 
S10.— Cowering 1936-37 



Why take chances of creating dissatisfied customers — 
losing money on a ;ob — wasting valuable time — when 
the COMPLETE set of seven Rider Manuals gives ALL 
the necessary service information you need, WHEN you 
need it — AT A COST OF ONLY A FEW CENTS A DAY, 

Stop taking chances — fill in Your Set of Rider Manu- 
als Today at Your Jobber's. 

JOHN F. RIDER, Publisher, 1440 Broadway, New York City 



AMD 
OTHER 



The Cathode - Ray 
Tube at Work 
Complete, practical 
information on os- 
cillographs, etc. 336 
. 450 Ulus. $2.50 



Hour a It;iy With 
Rider On Resonance 
& Alignment. 
You need tliisl 96 
pps. 48 illu5. Hard 
cover; only . . .60c 



Hour a Day With 
Rider On DC Volt- 
age Distribution in 
Radio Receivers. 

96 pages. 69 illus. 
Hard cover. . . .60c 



Servicing 

Superheterodynes. 
Make repairs on con- 
stantly changing su- 
perhets at profitable 
speed 288 pps. $1.00 



Hour a Day With 
Rider On Automatic 
Volume Control. 
Will speed up your 
AVC work. 96 pps. 
Go illus 60c 



Servicing Receivers 
by Means of Resis- 
tance Measurements 
Tells how to use 
Ohmeter. 203 pps. 
93 illus Sl.OO 





No drip-pan needed! 

Triumph Model 120 does not 
leak r.f. to ruin sensitivity 
measurements! 



On a new Signal Generator! 
Triumph Model 120 is a pre- 
cision Generator guaranteed 
to be better than any similar 
unit offered under $50 I I ! 
Money back 10 day free trial. 



TRIUMPH— factory to you net prices 

Signal Generator, No. 120. 100 kc to 75 mc, a.f. mod. ^ftQ95 
optional, dual uv attenuator, list S53.00 kP^O — 

Tube Tester, latest model No. 420, checks each A ASS 
element of 150 types lor all possible iaults! ^O — 



Calhode-Ray Oscillograph, 3" and electronic 
Wobbulaior, the easiest C-R to operate. Special 



100 



00 



Mulli-Range Meier, ac-dc volts, ohms, mils at 1000 ^ r 95 
ohms per volt. 3'/2" round meter, now only XO 

No extra charge for export packing, F.O.B. Chcago 

n::::r-----—---zz::-z~—Z^ZZZ7.-z:7^^ 



4017 W. Lake, Dcpt. RT.72, Chicago, III., Cable Triumco 
Please send complete catalog of instruments. 

Name 



Address- 
City 



-State- 



February, 1937 



61 



SUCCESSFUL 



PERFORmnncE 

unoER 
SEVERE canDiTiQns 



VttOOTY 



ACHIEVES 

UNIQUE RECORD 

IN ACTUAL USE 



SUCCESSFUL 

in performance; "A 
magniliceni instTument 
. . . Despite the climate 
here, results are mai- 
velous and could not 
be belteied. I am sure". 
D. Hopkins, Rallies 
Hotel, Singapore. 

SUCCESSFUL 

in design: "Your 
streamline mike is go- 
ing over big with our 
trade. Congratulations 
on its tine design and 
peilormance", 
H. Ruben, Saugus, 
Mass. 

successful; 

in construction: "We 
beJieve no ofher mike 
could take the punish- 
ment it has and still 
give such excellent re- 
production", Johnston 
P. A. Service, Oneonla, 
N.Y. 

SUCCESSFUL 

in sales: "The finest 
type microphone that I 
ever used . . Please 
dupUcate my order", 
Ridley's P.A. Systems^ 

FEATURES: ■"<^" T"'^"- O""- 

1. Output increased 6 D6. 

2. Triple shielded — entirely eliminat- 
ing hum pickup. 

3. Eliminates feedback troubles. 

4. Excellent for close talking and dis- 
tcfnt pickup. 

5. Acoustically designed to elimi- 
nate any possibility of cavity reso- 
nance. 

6. Fittedwithswitchandcable clamp. 

MODELS RBHn (High Impedance); RBMn 
(200 ohms) . $42.00 LIST 

NEW! Models RBSn , RSHn: streamline: slight- 
ly lower output and frequency range than 

above $32.90 LIST 

Models RAL (200 ohms); RAH (2000 
ohms). Built to Amperite standards; 
No peaks. Flat response. Triple 
shielded. Shock absorber. Swivel 
bracket. $22.00 LIST 

Finishes: All microphones have the new stand- 
ard Gunmetal Finish. Available in Chrome, 
extra, $1.00 List. 

FREE: WINDOW DECAL, advertising 
your SOUND SERVICE. Four-color 
design, SVi x 9'/4. Write for it now. 




Coble Addiess; ALkcm. Now York 
SGI BROADWAY N. Y. 



fiiMPERITE(o. 






TRADE FLASHES 



* Vance C. Woodcox, sales man- 
ager of field operations, RCA Vic- 
tor, announces the following new ap- 
pointments: E. W. Butler, in charge 
of phonograph sales, under Paul C. 
Richardson, manager radio and 
phonograph division. George R. 
Ewald, manager Pittsburgh district. 
M. F. Blakeslee, manager Chicago 
district, replacing F. H. Larrabee, re- 
signed. F. M. Bewsher, manager At- 
lanta district. District office located at 
New Orleans has been transferred to 
Memphis, Tenn. Norman Bass, for- 
merly manager of Cincinnati district, 
will be Memphis district manager. 
D. E. Neiswander has been appointed 
manager Cincinnati district. 

■*■ P. H. Tartak, president Oxford- 
Tartak Radio Corp., Chicago, an- 
nounces the appointment of C. R. 
Bluzat as mid-western sales manager. 
Mr. Bluzat has been associated" with 
radio since 192 5 in various engineer- 
ing and executive capacities. He was 
sales engineer for the Transformer 
Corp. of America, vice-president in 
charge of engineering and production 
for the Standard Transformer Corp., 
and president of Premier Products 
Inc. tintil his present affiliation with 
Oxford-Tartak. 

* The Trav-Ijer Radio & Televi- 
sion Coip. has .iust added another 
floor to its factory facilities at 1036 
W. Van Buren Street, Chicago, 111. It 
now occupies three floors with a total 
area of more than 30,000 square feet. 
Jack Hoffman, president of the com- 
pany, reports that 1936 was banner 
year in the company's history, with 
sales figures far ahead of 1935. New 
additions to the company's sales or- 
ganization include Neal Baer, well 
known radio man who has joined the 
sales staff for general field work. 
New Trav-Ler representatives in- 
clude Bernard Lippin, 180 8th Ave., 
New York City, who will handle 
Metropolitan New York and New 
Jersey territory; I. H. Feigenbaiim, 
Philadelphia, and James Hayes, East- 
ern Trade Associates, Boston, Mass. 

* George A. Scovllle, vice-presi- 
dent and general manager for Strom- 
berg-Carlson has announced that all 
divisions of the company, engineer- 
ing, production, sales and advertis- 
ing, will be geared up to handle big 
sales increases in 1937. Mr. Sco- 
ville's statement also mentioned 3 
new models added to the Stromberg 
line, a stronger jobber organization, 
and higher prices on sets. 

* PhiIco has been forced to ac- 
quire 115,000 additional sq. ft. of 
manufacturing space in Philadelphia. 
Expansion plan will hike the produc- 
tion of auto sets 50 per cent; new 
plant will require 900 workers, and 
will be used for auto radio assembly, 
export conversion, packing voice coil 
winding and warehousing. 

* Offered to jobbers for re-issue 
to dealers and servicemen, is a new 
sales help in the form of a combined 
calendar and order card holder pre- 
sented by Hygrade Sylvania Corp. 
Item is designed to hang on the wall 
and may be had at nominal charges. 




Complete 
Electric Plants 

ONAN ALTERNATING CURRENT 
GENERATING PLANTS furnish the 
same electricity as city power lines. Made 
in sizes 3 50 to 10,000 watts to meet the 
requirements of those who must provide 
their own electricity for Farms, Summer 
Camps, Cottages, Boats, Commercial Pur- 
poses. 

OPERATE A. C. RADIO 
These A. C. Planes operate RADIO, 
HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES, WATER 
PUMP, MOTORS— anything that nor- 
mally would operate from city lines. Will 
run Public Address Systems, Demonstrat- 
ing Car Equipment, Talking Moving Pic- 
tures, X-Ray. 

MODERN CONSTRUCTION 

ONAN PLANT Engines are like the Motor 
Car, Truck or Tractor Engines. Operate 
on Gasoline, Gas or Distillate. Wiring and 
Installation is the same as for standard ap- 
plications. Also 32 volt. Direct Current 
Models. Write for details 

D. W. ONAN & SONS 

570 Royalston Ave. Minneapolis, Minn. 




QUALITY 

since 

1923 



RADIO PARTS & HARDWARE 

ARHCO products have been 
accepted as standard for 
quality and reliability for over 
16 years. 

In the hardware and parts line 
we cater to the diversified re- 
quirements of the service man, 
experimenter and manufacturer. 
Our complete line of Mycalex 
parts is designed to meet the 
rigid requirements of the dis- 
criminating amateur and engi- 
neer. 

Let us serve you in your Radio 
Hardware and Radio Parts re- 
quirements. 

Write Today for Complete Catalog No. 37 

American 

RADIO HARDVVARE CO., Inc. 
476 Broad%vay, New York, N. V. 



62 



Radio Today 



■k Southern Califoiiiia Radio & 
Refrigerator Dealers Ass'n. was one 

of the organizations in on a big co- 
operative move to get everybody in 
the Los Angeles area to listen to the 
Presidential inauguration broadcasts 
Jan. 20. Dealers loaned hundreds 
of sets to schools during the drive, 
•working with KXX, the CBS Pacific 
outlet, the Los Angeles Examiner, 
and a group of municipal and civic 
groups. 

■* New radio store in Greensboro, 
N. C, is the Cashwell Electric Co., 
recently opened by Dave Cashwell at 
110 S. Green St. Store will sell 
Norge appliances and Zenith Radios, 
according to officials of Southern 
Bearings & Parts; Co., Charlotte, 
X. C distributors for those two 
lines. 

■*• Czechoslovakia recently placed 
an order for all-wave Philco re- 
ceivers for its diplomatic corps In 
19 countries, to link its Ministers 
and Charges d'affiairs with the home 
country by air. Also Uruguay placed 
a trial order for 2 20 Philco receivers 
for use in that country's public 
school system, long recognized as 
one of the finest in the Western 
Hemisphere. These announcements 
were made by the American Steel 
Export Co., Inc., of New York, Phil- 
co's export agents. 

* Arctuiiis Radio Tube Co., New- 
ark, N. J., has notified all of its dis- 
tributors and many dealers in the 
flood areas that tubes rnd cartons 
damaged by the flood will be recon- 
ditioned and reboxed, free of charge. 

* Paul H. Tartak, president of 
Oxford-Tartak Radio Corp, has ac- 
quired the controlling interest in 
Premier Products, Inc. Mr. Tartak 
announces the removal of the plant 
and offices to a new and larger loca- 
tion at 915 W. Van Buren Street, 
Chicago. 

* Breaking all attendance rec- 
ords for recent dealer meetings, more 
than 2,500 members of the Metro- 
politan New York trade attended a 
pre-view of Fairbanks-Moise refrig- 



eration products at the Park Central 
Hotel on Jan. 17th, under the au- 
spices of Fairbanks-Morse and 
Bruno-Xew York, Inc., local distrib- 
utors for this company's refrigera- 
tion line. Irving Samoff, vice presi- 
dent of the distributing organiza- 
tion, functioned as toastmaster, and 
the presentation of the new products 
was handled ably by W. P. Jones, 
vice president and general manager 
of Fairbanks-Morse and Parker H. 
Ericksen of the company's sales ex- 
ecutive organization. More than 1500 
dealers attended the dinner, and dur- 
ing the course of the evening, four 
ballrooms were utilized for the large 
crowd who danced to the music of 
three orchestras and who also paid 
close attention to a specially engaged 
floor-show. 

■*• Bruno Ivaboratories, Inc., mike 
manufacturers, have moved from 2 
West 22nd St. to new quarters at 30 
West 15th St., N.Y.C. Firm has 
leased 10.000 additional square feet 
at the new site, and have installed 
equipment to make the production of 
the new Velotron mike completely 
automatic. 

* Foreign division of Crosley 
Radio Corp. has reported that the 
company's products are now being 
sold in 120 countries and colonies 
throughout the world. A. G. Lind- 
say is manager of the division. 

■*• Elaborate plans have been 
made by GE for 45 New York and 
New Jersey radio dealers and their 
wives to sail on Feb. 2 7th for a 6- 
day winter vacation cruise to Ber- 
muda. Trip will be made on the 
luxurious S.S. Volendam; GE's 
district radio sales manager D. AV. 
May is heading the activity. 

* L. E. Reid, president of Amer- 
ican Electric Co., St. Joseph, Mo., 
who is described as the oldest distrib- 
utor for Croslej', was honored last 
month by a surprise party staged by 
his organization. Congratulatory 
telegrams arrived from all parts of 
the U. S., including one from Powel 
Crosley, Jr.. president, Crosley Ra- 
dio Corp., Cincinnati. 



* Important in the GE sales set- 
up are the facts: Fred A. Ray has 
been promoted to be district radio 
sales manager for the Cleveland 
area: W. P. "Bill" Saunders has 
been named sales manager for the 
Middle Atlantic district with head- 
quarters in Philadelphia; George S. 
Peterson has been appointed sales 
manager of factory sales branches in 
Chicago and Peoria, 111. 



S^/mmmUM^ 



1937 Knight Radios offer you 
unbeatable profit- making oppor- 
tunities! Sensational new feature 
Include giant 11-in. Magna-Span 
Dials and super-dynamic Vita-Tone 
Speakers. Unmatched performance, 
at amazingly low prices. 3S models, 
5-19 tubes, as low as $8,451 



WMOServmParts 



You can fill every service need 
from the ALLIED Catalog — at 
lowest prices. Lists over 10,000 
exact duplicate and replacement 
parts, complete test equipment, 
tools, books, etc. You save time, 
trouble and money on every pur- 
chase by ordering from ALLIED. 



£-^ 




Sent! For CAT/IL06 




This great 152-page Cata- 

also shows newest 

sound systems, amateur 

gear, kits, Rurlpower units 

and Windchargers. etc. 

Whatever you need, you'll 

always find it in the 

ALLIED Catalog at 

the lowest prices. 



ALLIED RADIO 



ALLIED RADIO CORPORATION Dept. 15-B 

BS33 W. Jackson Blvd., Chicago, III. | 

Send us your new 1937 Catalog (Free). ■ 

I Name | 

a Address ■ 

City ■ 




Both single and double trace selectivity 
curves are obtained only with C-B Cath- 
ode-Ray equipment due to use oF the 
exclusive "Inductor-Sweep" principle. 



CATHODE-RAY Equipment for 1/2 Price! 

Clough-Brengle Model 105 Oscillograph $^Q90 

with 30,000-cycle sweep, dual amplifiers, etc. ^T^# net 



For half the former investment, you now can 
equip your shop with this profit building C-Ray 
oscillograph. The new MODEL 105 is the only 
one-inch oscillograph equal in completeness 
and performance to the larger types with 
features such as: a wider range sweep circuit, 
1 5 to 30,000 cycles, dual amplifiers linear to 
100,000 cycles, double the usual input sensi- 
tivity (.68 volts full screen deflection), positive 
lock-in synchronizing circuit, and two-section 
power supply for complete stability. 

If you want value and performance, see the 
MODEL 105 before buying. Complete in 
every detail. Nothing extra to buy. Your C-B 
jobber now has it in stock. 



Szz Your Jobber Today — Or Use This Coupon 



Modernize Your Oscillator 
for C-Ray Application 

Just connect your oscillator output to the MODEL 
81 -A separate frequency modulator and be ready for 
C-Ray alignment. No loss of calibration, drilling, or 
rewiring — no complicated connections. Plugs directly 
into the MODEL 1 05 or CR A oscillographs to provide 
either single or double trace selectivity curves. Write 
for descriptive bulletin. 



The CLOUGH-BRENGLE CO. 



■ 2827 W. 19th St, Chicago, 111., U.S. A. | 

H Send at once full description of the new MODEL h 

^ 105 Cathode-ray oscillograph and time payment S 

order blank. ^ 

Name | 

Address _ | 



February. 1937 



63 




- - BIGGER 
and BETTER 
THAN EVER 

83% more pages . . . listing' 400 
makes and 7,000 models ... up 
to the minute — including 1936 
and early '3T leceivers. Shows 
how a mere handful of stand- 
ard controls will senice most 
every set — and — for that un- 
usual job, we list special re- 
placement controls. 

Sound projection and tone con- 
trol switch data is generously 
featured. Often called the 
"serviceman's bible" ... it 
should be on every service 
bench, and in every service kit. 

As usual it is j'ours for the 
asking. 

Get Your New 1937 

Centralab 

Volume Control Guide 

From Your Jobber 



Oent^ab 



Miliivaukee, Wis. 

Division of Globe Union, Inc. 

BRITISH CENTRALAB, Ltd. 
Canterbury Road, Kilburn 
London, N.W.6, England 



FRENCH CENTRALAB CO. 

1 18 Avenue Ledru-Rollin 

Paris XI, France 



DOPE ON DISTRIBOTORS 




TWIN CITY Philco dealers shown here reversed the usual custom and threw a 
big party to honor L. W. and R. B. Cohen of the Roycraft Co., Minneapolis jobbers. 



* Ditch, Bowers & Taylor, Inc., 

Baltimore, Md., distributors oi 
American Bosch sets and Hygrade 
Sylvania tubes, have added 3 new 
salesmen to the staff: J. J. Matthews 
to cover western Maryland; Hari-y 
Bentz, for Baltimore City; and 
George Habler for the eastern part 
of Maryland. 

* RCA \ ictor Distributing Corp., 

Chicago, has announced the appoint- 
ment of Hariy D. Schoenwald as 
sales manager, Harold Renholm as 
ad manager, and W. T. Meyers as 

manager of the record dept. 

* Appliances, Inc., the Cincin- 
nati distributors for Fairbanks- 
Morse, have established a new whole- 
sale division at 130 N. St. Clair St., 
Dayton, Ohio. Featured at the loca- 
tion will be a modern display room 
and a new service organization of 
factory trained men headed by Carl 
F. Geiger. 



* A. J. Moore, formerly merchan- 
dise manager for the Milhender-Afes 
Electrical Co. of Boston, is now with 
the Geo. H. Wahn Co., Boston job- 
bers for Fada sets and Raytheon 
tubes. 

* Wholesale Radio Sei-vice Co., 

New York City, encourages the 
"hams" of the area to call and try 
out the latest radio apparatus of- 
fered by the firm. Sound-proof 
booths are provided for the purpose; 
demonstrations of p. a. systems are 
also current. 

■* Assortment of promotion aids 
has been assembled by GE for pres- 
entation with the companj''s 4 new 
auto radios: 1 demonstration dis- 
play, 2 truck and store banners, 1 
wall chart, 100 auto door handle 
hangers, 100 handbills, 2 window 
streamers, 50 folders, 4 reflectors. 




CURB SERVICE expert, J. A. Swanson, parts jobber of Racine, Wis., has just 
moved into new headquarters with 3 times his former floor space. 



64 



Radio Today 



CANNON- 
BALL 
HEADSETS 




FOR A FAST GROWING MARKET 

LJEADSETS are selling faster than at any time since the incep- 
-^ -'- tion of the loudspeaker! 

Three million homes now have two or more radio sets — requiring 
headphones to eliminate conflict in the home — and millions of 
other sets, now in use, will be equipped. 

The new demand for silent reception without disturbance to 
others is opening up a vast market for single and double headsets; 
not only in receivers now in use but in the millions that are added 
every year. Manufacturers are beginning to install adaptors or 
switches, or otherwise wire their receivers to take headphones. 

In central radio, also, the trend is to headsets. And, of course, 
the group-hearing aid is solely a headphone proposition. 

Jobbers, dealers, servicemen, installers of central radio and group- 
hearing aids, will find a RESPONSIVE MARKET for EFFICIENT, 
LIGHT WEIGHT, GOOD-LOOKING 'PHONES— a profitable 
market, too. We are receiving orders, large and small, from every 
state in the Union and many foreign countries. 

Pictured above is o^te of our leaders — the DIXIE "OLD 
FAITHFUL" CANNON-BALL, list $2.60. Send for illus- 
trated bulletin covering the complete Catinon-Ball line, 

C. F. CAN NON COMPANY 

'^~^^~^~~~~~^~—~ Manufacturer! 



SPRINGWATER 



NEW YORK 





KADIOTECHNIC "R-T-L" 
announces these new and 
exclusive features of its 
short circuit test: Neon 
sensitivity on active ele- 
ment shorts — meter sensi- 
tivity on all shorts — 
greater than any other 
tester. Double checking — 
neon and meter — shows what tube will do in actual 
service. Other equally unique and important ad- 
vances in design — all new! Get complete details! 

Ask For Folder 

THE RADIOTECHNIC LABORATORY fL^m'^i^s 



''^^f Tube ^ -^ "^ ^ 



Tube 
^Test 



^iJSj Equipment 



RADIOTECHNIC 



February, 1937 



WST AS SCIENCE HAS ADDED 
YEARS TO THE U¥E Of MAN . . . 




ARCTURUf 

has added hours ot 

DEPENDABLE, TROUBLE-FREE SERVICE 

to ---■--' 



Just as scientists have added many years to average 
human life, so have Azcturus engineers built up the 
25ZS^-eliminBting all the troubles, sporadic but 
bothersome, that seemed inherent in this tube. Prev- 
alent have been "flash-overs"; open cathode tabs 
caused by overloads; slow-heating; shorts with resul- 
tant blo^vn filter condensers; filament failures in 
excess of normal.. . . The new Arcturus 25Z5 protects 
users from these troubles. A high 
margin of safety built into these 
tubes, makes this 25Z5 outperform * 
and outlast ordinary tubes and 
withstand abuse. 

Start using them today — on EVERY 
job! Keep customers satisfied. Pro- 
tect your reputation by selling only 
the "quality" tube— Arcturus. 

ARCTURUS RADIO TUBE CO., 

NEWARK, N. J. U. S. A. 




MFR. ARCTURUS 
E 25Z5 

There is no ordinary vray to test 25Z5's effectively. You've 
got to treat thetn roughs just as they are treated in actual 
use. Shoot overload after overload into them. Snap them on 
and off constantly. Let 'em burn for many hours at a stretch. 
Under such an extremely severe test the Arcturus Z5Z5 
Tubes came through with results indicated in the accom- 
panying graph — having an effective operating life consid- 
erably in excess of five leading competitive makes of 
tubes, the average life of urhich is also indicated! 

Tiiey Heat in 11 Seconds! 

Ai^€Tyi^ys II 



INDEPENDENT TUBES FOR DEALERS WHO 
DO THEIR OWN INDEPENDENT THINKING 



65 



DOPE ON DISTRIBUTORS 



• Harrison Radio Co., 12 W. 

Broadway, N. Y. C, have been ap- 
pointed exclusive distributors for 
Utah "bam" equipment in greater 
New York. Harrison plans to fea- 
ture a new Add-A-TJnit transmitter 
kit recently announced by Utah. 



* Capital City Distributing Coi-p., 

RCA distributors of Albany, N. Y., 
whose address has been 1039 Broad- 
way, have now moved to new quar- 
ters at 33 Orange St., in the center 
of Albany's downtown section. Firm 
has a branch at Springfield, Mass. 



* Ernest and Harold Ammer- 
man, of the Radio Accessories Co., 

jobbing firm of Orlando, Pla., re- 
cently went to Owensboro, Ky., to 
visit the Ken-Rad tube plant. Next 
day after their arrival, all roads were 
closed due to flood waters; the boys 
were marooned for two weeks. 

• W. U. Dutton & Sons, the 

Hastings, Neb., distributors of Emer- 
son sets, RCA and Hygrade Sylvania 
tubes and Leonard refrigerators, 
have just acquired ABC washers and 
ironers. 




HIGH GRADE JOBBERS, this time 
spelled "Hygrade" because these are 
the gentlemen present at Hygrade 
Sylvania' s sales meeting for south- 
eastern jobbers held at Atlanta, Ga.. 
Jan. 15-16. Hosts were Fulwiler £ 
Chapman, the tube company's repre- 
sentatives there. Find these numbers 
in the picture: 

1—W. C. Boyd— Balling Electric 
Co., Jackson, Miss.; 2 — A. J. Wheeler 
and 3 — H. Friedman — Chattanooga 
Paper and Woodenware Co., Chat- 
tanooga, Tenn.; 4 — Tom. Frerk and 5 — 
3". T. Freck—Freck Radio and Supply 
Co., Asheville, N. C; 6—H. M. Car- 
penter — Thurow Radio Distributors, 
Tampa and Miami, Fla.: 7 — T. 0. 
Roe and 8 — H. A. ^Vllson — Long 
Lewis Hardware Co., Birmingham, 
Ala.; 9 — .1. /. Hickey — House Hasson 



Hardware Co., Knoxville, Tenn.; 10 — 
F. F. Dill — Chattanooga Paper and 
Woodenware Co., Chattanooga, Tenn.; 
11 — L. E. Salmon — Tennessee Valley 
Electric Supply Co., Tupelo, Miss. ; 
12 — H. J. Ballum — Shuler Supply Co., 
Neiv Orleans, La.; 13 — /. R. McMillian 
— Hygrade Sylvania salesman, At- 
lanta; 14 — J. T. Fuhviler — Hygrade 
Sylvania Corp. southeastern sales rep- 
resentative, Atlanta; 15 — John C. 
Garter — Radio Sound and Service Co., 
Knoxville, Tenn.; 16 — N. R. Casey — 
House Hasson Hardicare Co., Knox- 
ville, Tenn.: 17 — Howard Croivell and 
18 — /. J. Pardee — Radio Sound and 
Service Co., Knoxville, Tenn.; 19 — 
W. F. Joyner — Freeh Radio and Sup- 
ply Co., Asheville, N. C; 20— E. E. 
Nelson — Nelson Radio and Siipply Co.. 
Mobile, .Ala.; 21— J. R. Wiggins— 
ilafhis d- Youmans Co.. Valdosta, Ga.; 



22 — J. G. McKnight — Perfection Mat- 
tress and Spring Co., Birmingham, 
Ala.; 23— J. F. Gordy—Beck and 
Gregg Hardware Co., Atlanta, Ga.; 
24 — Grady Bolt — Sullivan Hardware 
Co., A7iderson, S. C; 25— J. C. Luttrell 
— Atlanta Phonograph Co., Atlanta, 
Ga.; 26— P. 8. Ellison— Reneival Tube 
Sales Manager, Hygrade Sylvania 
Corp., New York, N. Y.; 27— B. W. 
Krell and 28 — F. E. Beaudry — Dixie 
Radio Co,, Columbia, S. C; 29 — Don 
Follmer — southeastern representative 
lamp sales, Hygrade Sylvania Corp.; 
30 — Herndon Thomas — Peaslee-Gaul- 
bert Co., Atlanta, Ga.; 31 — A. L. Milk 
— reneival sales supervisor Hygrade 
Sylvania Corp., Emporium, Pa.; 32 — 
C. W. Chapman — Hygrade Sylvania 
Corp., southeastern sales representa- 
tive, Atlanta. Ga.: 33 — J. W. Clary- 
Clary Marsli Co., Birmingham, Ala. 



VELOCITY 




^gLECTRO-^OlGE 



MICROPHONES 



CARBON 



"V" SERIES 

The all-feature microphone. 
Preferred by discerning Sound 
and Communication engineers 
the World over. Three models 
priced from $35.00 to $75.00, 
list. 

ELECTRO-VOICE MFG. CO., Inc. 

328 EAST COLFAX AVE. 
SOUTH BEND, IND. 




"K" SERIES 

Genuine quality brought to the 
low-price field. Three models 
from $19.50 to $29.50, list. Also 
a Static-Velocity model at 
$20.00, list. Five popular carbon 

models priced from 
• $5.00 to $25.00, list. 

SOLD BY LEADING JOBBERS Complete repair serv- 
WRITE FOR CATALOGUE ice on all makes. 




66 



Radio Today 



"BULLET" 

DYNAMIC MICROPHONES 




AT LAST 

an ALL-PURPOSE Microphone . , , 

T.R. 2 — Standard model "Bullet" . . . 
the ultimate in dynamic microphone de- 
sign and performance . . . List price, any 
impedance . . . $39.50. 

T. R. 3 — New model ' ' Bullet' "... smaller 
than TR2 but with relatively the same 
characteristics . . . List price, any im- 
pedance . . . $24.50. 

Send for circular "E" and ieclmical data 



TRANSDUCER CORPORATION 

30 Rockefeller Plaza 
New York, New York 




SPRING 
CJITA&OC 

FREEI 




sound] Among these 116 pages you will see the new 
LAFAYETTE COORDINATED SOUND 
SYSTEMS. A masterwork of engineering — 
complete systems in packaged units ready 
for installation. 

AUTO sets] The new LAFAYETTE line of auto 
ets is the largest we have ever carried 
■alucs that cannot be beat — quality 
;uarantced. 

receivers! The complete LAFAYETTE line ranges 
from 4 to 24 tubes, from 57-95 up. Sold 
on the famous 30 DAY FREE TRIAL BASIS. 

You will marvel at these amazing 

, bargains. 

PARTSi This new Catalog features more than 10.000 
al values in everything you need in radio. 




buildei 



and I 



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r«T i Tiwii i T(fiiiii- ii iiviiBffMfiiiiima3 

MAII. THi COUPON NOW 



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I wTiol ESA 'EllADIo'sERVrCE CO.. INC. 

■ 100 Sixth Avenue New York, N. Y. 

■ Please rush new 116 page FREE catalog No. 68-I2B7 



I NAME— 



I ADDRESS. 
I 



JOBBER NEWS 



* Recently appointed by the 
Emerson Radio <& Phonograph Coip. 
as new distributors are Graybar 
Electi'ic Co., Inc., Savannah, Ga.; 
Graybar Electric Co., Inc., Jackson- 
ville, Fla. ; Emerson-New York, Inc., 
Xew York, N. Y.; Graybar Electric 
Co., Inc., Atlanta, Ga.; and Emerson- 
Xew Jersey, Inc., Newark, N. J. 

* Crosley jobbers who have been 
recent hosts to dealers at shows held 
to feature the 1937 Shelvadors are: 
Stimpson Sales and Investment Corp., 
Wichita, Kan.; Greusel Co., Milwau- 
kee; Frank H. Clay Co., Kalamazoo, 
Mich. ; American Electric Co., Kansas 
City, Mo.; Apollo Distributing Co., 
Newark, N. J.; Crosley Distributing 
Corp., Chicago; Kiefer-Stewart Co., 
Indianapolis, Ind. ; Anchor Lite Ap- 
pliance Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.; Reader's 
AVholesale Distributors, Houston, 
Tex.; C. E. Hamlin Co., Jackson, 
Mich.; Ackerman Electrical Supply 
Co., Grand Rapids, Mich. ; Roger 
& Baldwin Hdw. Co., Springfield, Mo. 

* When P. I. Burks & Co., radio 
distributors, 911 West Broadway, 
Louisville, Ky., suffered the immer- 
sion of a quantity of their stock dur- 
ing the recent Ohio River floods, 
they found that a number of radio 
manufacturers offered to replace the 
damaged material with new mer- 
chandise, without the extra cost, so 
that fresh stocks would be on hand. 
Among the lines carried by the Burks 
company are RCA, Solar, Yaxley, 
Sprague, Cornell-Dubilier, Centralab 
and Electrad. 

* Stewart- Wanier Coit). has an- 
nounced the appointment of four 
new distributors for radio and refrig- 
erator lines: Dietz Distributing Co., 
Cincinnati. Ohio: Alemite Co., San 
Antonio. Tex.: Indiana Distributing 
Co., Indianapolis. Ind. SW appoint- 
ment of Kelly-HoAv-Thomson, Du- 
luth. Minn., was announced earlier. 

RMA THUMBS-DOWNS 
SETS AT SHOWS 

* "Exliihition of radio sets in 
trade shows and public shows by set 
manufacturers or distributors, is not 
helpful to the radio business, and is 
not approved," according to a show 
policy determined unanimously by 
the EITA board of directors meeting 
at Chicago last month. EMA mem- 
bers have been requested to refrain 
from such exhibitions and also to re- 
quest their distributors not to par- 
ticipate in local shows. 

A questionnaire sent out brought 
replies indicating that exhibiting sets 
at shows "deters rather than promotes 
the sale of receiving sets." and the 
EMA directors resolved that "this 
Board considers the exhibition by 
manufacturers of receiving sets as 
detrimental to the industry." 



• INDEX • 
TO ADVERTISEMENTS 



AEROVOX CORP bS 

ALLIED RADIO CORP 63 

AMERICAN RADIO HARDWARE CO., INC... 62 

AMPERITE CO 62 

ARCTURUS RADIO TUBE CD 65 

CANNON CO., C. F 65 

CENTRALAB 64 

CLAROSTAT MFG. CO., INC 55 

CLOUGH.BRENGLE CD 63 

COMMERCIAL CREDIT CORP 21 

CONTINENTAL CARBON, INC 59 

CORNELL-DUBILIER CORP 57 

DICTOGRAPH PRODUCTS CO.. INC 17 

ELECTRO-VOICE MFG. CO.. INC 66 

FAIRBANKS, MORSE & CO 46 

FRIGIDAIRE DIV., GENERAL MOTORS.... 43 

GALVIN MFG. CORP Cover IV 

GENERAL ELECTRIC CO Cover III 

GENERAL HOUSEHOLD UTILITIES CO. ..4, 49 

GENERAL INDUSTRIES CO., THE 68 

HYGRADE SYLVANIA CORP 37 

INTERNATIONAL RESISTANCE CO 27 

J. F. D. MFG. CO 53 

KEN. RAD TUBE & LAMP CORP 40 

MICAMOLD PRODUCTS CORP 29 

MUTER, CO., THE 56 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING CO Cover II 

NATIONAL CARBON CO., INC 33 

NOBLITT-SPARKS INDUSTRIES, INC 23 

ONAN & SONS, D. W 62 

OPERADIO MFG. CO 58 

PARRIS.DUNN CORP 5 

PHILCO RADIO & TELEVISION CORP 6 

PIONEER GEN.E-MOTOR CORP 3 

PRESTO RECORDING CORP 42 

RADIO & TECHNICAL PUBL. CO 47 

RADIOBAR COMPANY OF AMERICA 41 

RADIO CORP. OF AMERICA 34, 35 

RADIO RECEPTOR CO., INC 60 

RADIOTECHNIC LABORATORY, THE 65 

RADOLEK 48 

RAYTHEON PRODUCTION CORP 31 

RCA MFG. CO.. PARTS DIV 54 

RCA MFG. CO.. RCA-VICTOR DIV 2 

RIDER, JOHN F 61 

SIMPLEX RADIO CO 1 

SIMPSON ELECTRIC CO 57 

SPRAGUE PRODUCTS CO 61 

TRANSDUCER CORP 67 

TRAV.LER RADIO & TELEVISION CORP... 33 

TRIAD MFG. CO., INC 59 

TRIPLETT ELEC. INSTRUMENT CO 39 

TRIUMPH MFG. CO 61 

UNITED SCIENTIFIC LABS.. INC 25 

UNIVERSAL CONTROLS. INC 60 

UNIVERSAL MICROPHONE CO.. LTD 41 

UTAH RADIO PRODUCTS CO 59 

WARD LEONARD ELECTRIC CO 55 

WARD PRODUCTS CORP 68 

WEBSTER. CHICAGO 54 

WEDGE MFG. CO 55 

WHITE DENTAL MFG. CO., S. S 53 

WHOLESALE RADIO SERVICE CO 67 

WRIGHT-DeCOSTER, INC 48 



While every precaution is taken to insure accu- 
racy, we cannot guarantee against the possibility 
of an occasional change or omission in the prep- 
aration of this index. 



February, 1937 



67 




FINE PERFORMANCE 

in Radio-Phonographs 
Depends On the Motor 

YES . . . and flue performance is 
yours, to proclaim without reser- 
vation, when you install the latest 
model G. I. FLYER Motors. Sure 
starting, maintaining selected run- 
ning speed with fine accuracy re- 
gardless of record drag, and noise- 
less. Self - lubricating laminated 
geai-s and long over - size bear- 
ings. Precision-built, which means 
long life without repairs. Two 
speeds — SSy^ or 78 r.p.m., in- 
stantly changed by simple shift 
lever. For AC, DC, or universal 
AC-DC. Order a sample TODAY. 
Be sxu-e to specify exact voltage 
and frequency of current you use. 

^ScGenemail Imjustmies CO. 

J738 TAYLOR STREET, ELYRIA, OHIO 

Ask for FREE samples of 
TRUETONE needles 



ij NEW UIRRD 

AUTO AERIALS 





MODEL T. A.— The'Tur-relte.-One ol the 
new top aerials featured by WARD for 1937. 

NO DRILLING IN TOP 
SEND FOR CATALOG TODAY 

WARD PRODUCTS CORP. 

WARD BLDG. CLEVELAND, OHIO 

CANADA: ATLAS RADIO CORP., TORONTO, ONT. 
FOREIGN: LINCOLN EXPORT CO., NEW YORK 



USE THIS COUPON 



WARD PRODUCTS CORP. 
Ward BIdg. - Cleveland, O. 
Send information of Ward's 1937 Auto Aerials. 

Name ^ 

Address 

Check a Dealer D lobber D Service Man 




.^.S-'3*f!;.^riF5." TSi 



TELEVISION ARTIST gets assistance from Philco engineer Albert F. Murray. 

RADIO & TELEVISION 



• TELEVISION took a step, if 
not a leap forward in public attention 
with. Philco's Feb. 11 demonstration 
of its 441-line picture. With this ad- 
vance from 345 lines to 441. EMA 
standards are matched with what 
Philco presents as its "high fidelity" 
system, and the problem of how to get 
detail in telecast pictures seems well 
solved. 

This extraordinary show was pre- 
sented for a press group invited to 
the Germantown Cricket Club, in 
North Philadelphia. Pictures were 
received there from the transmitter 
at the Philco plant, about 3 air miles 
away, on improved receivers which 
had fewer controls and fewer tubes as 
well as better picture quality. 

Sayre M. Eamsdell, Philco vice- 
president, confronted the guests with 
answers to the popular question, 
"When will we have television ?" Mr. 
Eamsdell said that it was not likely 
by Christmas time, this year, and 
named at least 5 things which will 
have to be done before picture broad- 
casting can be generally used. These 
were concerned with further technical 
standards set by the FCC, licenses, 
program sources, and cost. 

James M. Skinner, president, Phila- 
delphia Storage Battery Co., and 
chairman of the EMA television com- 
mittee, explained that a definite and 
roomy spot in the broadcast band 
must officially be set aside for tele- 
vision. He pointed out that other 



interests are already active in cinch- 
ing the disputed band for themselves, 
and that television interests should 
hurry to prove the importance of their 
position. 

Philco engineer Albert F. Murray 
opened the show. On each receiver 
appeared a black and white picture 
about 7% inches by 11, watched by lY 
persons per group in the darkened 
room. General reaction was that how- 
ever the pictures behaved, their be- 
havior was still attractive. Objects 
such as dollar bills, newspapers, and 
photos of movie stars were televised 
to provide a study of detail ; engineers 
switched the system from 345 lines to 
441 lines alternately so that specta- 
tors could observe the difference. 

Newsreels, singers, fashion shows 
and a Boake Carter interview were 
flashed on the screens. Television 
camera at the Philco plant went out- 
doors at one point to pick up a pic- 
ture of the television antenna. Sound 
was transmitted at 54 mc. and picture 
signals at 49 mc. 

* * « 

Although there has yet been no 
public demonstration, pictures of 441 
lines are also being transmitted by 
ECA and NBC from the Empire 
State Tower in New York City. These 
have been successfully received by 
television receivers in the homes of 
ECA-NBC engineers and technicians. 
For these expei'iments, a television 
program technique is being developed 
in NBC studios. 



68 



Index to advertisements on page 67 



Radio Today 




^/aTTUm^-re^y^ 



IN THE GENERAL ELECTRIC AUTO 
RADIO 1937 MERCHANDISING DEAL 



A package of FOUR new, modern, sensation- 
al G-E AUTO RADIO MODELS, plus a big 
assortment of SALES PROMOTION SELLING 
AIDS, plus a sensible purchase plan on cus- 
tom-built mounting plates. Together, they 
comprise the G-E Auto Radio MERCHANDIS- 
ING DEAL. Right at the beginning of the 
season, y°^ 9®* everything you need to 
sweep the auto radio market at a profit. 



GENERAL 4 
ELECTRIC 1 

I AUTO RADIO ^fl 

APPLIANCE AND MERCHANDISE DEPARTMENT, J 

^fcHEBAL ELECTRIC CO.. BRIDGEPORT. COIj^^^^l 



JUST LOOIf AT THIS ASSORTMENT OF MODELS 




AND LOOK OVER THIS LIST 
OF SALES PROMOTION MATERIALS 

*Demonstration-DisplaY Stand *Truck and Store Ban- 
ners *Wall Chart *Auto Door-handle Hangers *Hand- 
bills *Window Streamers *"Saftee" Auto Reflectors 
*Full-line Folders. 

GENERAL ELECTRIC GIVES YOU 

*Fast Turnover *Small Initial Investment *"Spotlight" 
Selling Features *"Custom-built" Controls for Instru- 
ment Panel Installation *Leadership in Design and Per- 
formance *The FIRST Auto Radio with AFC •*A model 
in each of the three major price-class brackets. 
Ask your G-E Radio Distributor for details of the General 
Electric AUTO RADIO 1937 MERCHANDISING DEAL. 



•ILUllL' 



THE l937FEATUni MIT! 



"GOLDEN VOICE" 
MOTOROU 

T/ie Aristocrat 
of Radio 
8 Tub«t 

List, $69.50 



^eca 



-J 



^ THAT MAKE MOTOROLA THE OUTSTANDING 



8-Inch Permanent Magnet Dynamic Speaker 

LOW BATTERY DRAIN 

ACOUSTINATOR EQUIPPED 



lODEL "70" 



DE LUXE 

6 Tubes 

[ List, $54.95 



8'lnctl Permanent Magnet Dynamic Speaker 
LOW BATTERY DRAIN 

ACOUSTINATOR EQUIPPED 



MODEL "S5" ACOUSTINATOR EQUIPPED 

LOW BATTERY DRAIN 

6 Tubes — Powerful S' Electro Dynamic Speaker 

List, $49.95 



REMARKABLE PERFORMANCE 

^r(ul 6' Electro Dynamic Speaker 
List, S39.9S 




DDEL "35" THE CHALLENGER— Ust, $29.95 

NEW LOW PRICES-BIG VALUE 
& Tubes— ^-Gang Tuning Condenser 



CAR RADIO FOR 1937. ..YOUR TRADE 
WILL THRILL TO THE EXCLUSIVE NEW 



\\ 



// 



ACOUSTINATOR 

PERSONAL PREFERENCE SELECTOR 



I Motorola again heads the parade with five outstanding FEATURE models . . . 
I Each representing value leadership in its price class . . . Priced lower than ever 
I before in Motorola's history. Take advantage of the remarkable sales and profit 

possibilities of this "stand-out" FEIATURE merchandise. FEATURES you can 
j easily demonstrate . . . FEATURES your customers can see and hear! Wzite for 

full information and prices. 






,«« <*<*» 




^'^:^>'/////i//fMhi(f(illi'nH»V<^" 



ENJOY NEW THRILLS 

Be Your Own Program Director 
Interpret Every Broadcast 
to Your Individual Taste 

With the thrilling new ACOUSTINATOR, you 
can dial programs far and near, accommodat- 
ing the sensitivity of your Motorola to your loca- 
tion, insuring distinct, noise-£ree reception. 

And as you ride you can interpret programs to 
suit your fancy . . . (VOICE) "spotlighting" 
your favorite speaker or soloist — or (MUSIC) 
enjoying balanced musical programs — or 
(BASS) emphasizing the mighty, deep bass 
instruments. 




LOW BATTERY DRAIN— Due to the use of 
Permanent Magnet Dynamic Speakers, Cold 
Cathode Tubes, Class "B" Audio System, New 
Design Power Transformers, and New Circuit 
Developments, the Battery Drain has been re- 
duced as much as 25% iri some models . . . 
Added Efficiency . . . New Economy of Opera- 
tion. An outstanding Motorola feature. 



Backed by Powerful National and Point-of-Purchase Advertising 

MATCHES ALL CARS-"ADAPTO" ANTENNA SYSTEM 

fin May, we will introduce a complete line of home radios. Write for com-\ 
'\plete details regarding this new Motorola profit-making opportunity. y 



GALVIN MFG. CORPORATION 

847 WEST HARRISON STREET, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



i 






▲ 



enls a Copy 



Caldwell-Clements, Inc., 480 Lexinston Ave., New York, N. Y. 



$1 Yearly 




MARCH, 1937 



An Akron, O., radio store daily invites women shoppers to 
stop in and listen to favorite broadcast programs. See page 8 



1: 




They're Thinking of Programs 

when they're looking at sets! 

NBC Network Programs are magnets that draw people to 
your store — a great force in selling the better sets 

Programs — and NBC all-star programs in particular — stretch out to 
influence people and places far beyond the reach of ordinary solicita- 
tion. So . . . remember this: when prospects enter your store, give 
them the best of the things that turned their steps there to begin with 
. . . NBC Programs. Know your NBC Stations and Programs, just as 
you know your sets. To tune them in swiftly, clearly, is to guarantee 
the success of your demonstrations. 

RCA presents the Metropolitan Opera every Saturday afternoon and "The Magic Key" 
every Sunday 2 to ^ P. M., E. S. T. Both on NBC Blue Network 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY 

A Radio Corporation of America Service 





w 



HEN you sell gasoline powered equipment — farm washing 
machines, smoH farm tools, battery chargers, etc. — there is 
nothing so vitally important as the gasoline motor itself. 

If the motor runs — and runs economically and free from trouble for 
years and years — customer kick-backs are unknown. If the motor 
falls down, then gone are your profits — In comes an unknown 
quantity of ill will that makes future sales harder and harder to get. 

Briggs & Stratton 4 Cycle Motors on the equipment you sell 
are a sure way to eliminate grief and profit gamble. Twenty 
years of small gasoline motor experience — over three-quarters 
of a million in daily use — and their enviable world-wide repu- 
tation for dependable, unfailing performance — protect you. 

You and your customers also have the backing of a responsible 

,,factory-supervised nation-wide service organization — that today 

b servicing Briggs & Stratton Motors bought many years 

ago — just like they will be doing a score of years from now. 

And, always working for you is the biggest thing of all in retail 
selling — a consumer acceptance unrivaled in the 4 cycle gasoline 
motor field — when you say, "It's povyered by Briggs & Stratton," 

Equipment powered by Briggs & Stratton is easier 
to sell — and the profits stay in your cash drawer. 

kBRIGGS & STRATTON CORP., MILWAUKEE, WIS., U. S. A. 



Briggs & Stratton 




RADIO TODA\, March, 1937, Vol. Ill, No. 3. published monthly by Caldwell-CIements, Inc., 480 Lexinston Ave., New York, N. Y. Subscription 
yearly $1.00 m U. S. and Latm American countries; $1.25 in Canada; $2.00 all other countries; single copy, 15c. Entered as second-class matter July 24, 
1936, at the post office at New York, N. Y., under the Act of March 3, 1879. Printed in U. S. A. Copyright 1937 by Caldwell-CIements, Inc. 



Index to advertisements on page 75 



nnounclng DICTOGRAPH DUQ-MATI 



HuMPHEEY BoGABT Starring in 
Warner Bros. MARKED WOMAN 





DICTOGRAPH IN THE MOVIES 

• Dictograph has been used in hundreds of moving 
pictures. Fourteen pictures now in production in 
Hollywood show either Executive or Staff Stations in 
actual use. Hollywood, sparing no expense to make 
every scene mirror life, invariably shows Dictograph 
Intercommunicating Systems in business offices, 
homes and other scenes where the symbol of modern 
intercommunication logically belongs. 





The Leader in th^ii 

Field has a profit i 

Dealers andC 



DICTOGRAPH, the oldest and best known firm in the 
intercommunication field, for the first time in its history 
offers a proposition to the radio trade. 

This proposal centers around our new, proven Duo-Matic 
Intercommunicating System — a two-station system that pro- 
vides genuine intercommunication with the all-essential fea- 
ture of two-way talk. In addition to the immediate profits to 
be made from the sale of Duo-Matic, you are also offered an ' 
opportunity without investment to profit from sales of our 
larger models that result directly from your own efforts. 
These include both the Dictograph Junior with one Executive 
and four or six staff stations — and the famous custom-built, 
larger Dictograph systems now being used by leading Amer- 
ican firms, the Federal Government, hospitals, schools, etc. 

Thus, Dictograph offers you intercommunication profits 
from equipment that satisfies the needs of all — from the small- 
est to the largest user. 

GENUINE INTERCOMMUNICATION— Do not confuse 
the Dictograph Duo-Matic with toy devices now being offered 
for intercommunication. Dictograph provides simultaneous 
two-way talk without the use of any listen-talk key — and 
no intercommunication is genuine without this feature. Dic- 



A. Pat O'Brien a 
Beveelt Roberts 
Warner Bros. Picti 
China Clipper 

B. WiLLAKD ROBEl 

SON and Ward Bo 
in Columbia Pictv 
The Man Who Lrv 
Twice 

C. Chester Mori 
and Wallace Cla 
in Columbia Pictii 
I Promise to P 

Radio Today 







ENUINE 2-WAY INTERCOMMUNICATION! 




■vo styles of stajf stations available. 



intercommunicating 
^lAKiNG plan for alert 
Distributors! 



tograph offers loud-speaking without tubes or any other 
typical radio-operating expenses. Dictograph systems assure 
absolute privacy. There is no all-day current drain — for Duo- 
Matic, like your doorbell, operates eight to twelve months on 
a few dry cell batteries. Duo-Matic is always ready for im- 
mediate action — day or night. In short, Dictograph Duo- 
Matic is genuine telephone equipment — smartly styled, 
sturdily constructed, and soundly engineered for long years of 
trouble-free service. 

A BIG WAITING MARKET- The market for Dictograph 
Duo-Matic is vast and unscratched. Doctors, Dentists, small 
offices, stores, shops and countless homes will buy practically 
on sight. (And don't forget the "traffic value" of the Duo- 
Matic; it draws folks into your store.) But that's just the be- 
ginning of your opportunity. You can build substantial extra 
profits with the entire Dictograph line through the sensa- 
tional proposition we have waiting for you. 

NATIONWIDE ORGANIZATION— Dictograph backs your 
effort by a long-established engineering sales and service or- 
ganization with branch offices in 18 key cities. No other firm 
knows as much about intercommunication because no other 
firm has built so many installations. 

SALES COOPERATION— We have a complete sales help 
service ready for you: Advertising folders, newspaper mats, 
window displays featuring famous stars of the silver screen, 
and Dictograph sales stimu-letters. National advertising in 
newspapers and publications is planned for early appearance. 

WRITE FOR THIS SENSATIONAL PROPOSITION— 

Intercommunication is definitely a part of the activities of 
every radio dealer. Before you make any plans for your de- 
partment be sure to get the full story of the Dictograph Duo- 
Matic and the other facts in this truly sensational nroposition. 
A coupon is provided for your convenience. Fill it in and 
mail immediately. 

DICTOGRAPH PRODUCTS CO., INC. 

580 fiffh Avenue New York, N. Y. 



Bette Davis starring in 
Warner Bros. MARKED WOMAN 



DICTOGRAPH 

?. Created the loud speaker. 

2. Creoted the Detective Dictograph, the sensitive 
m/cropfione widely used in po/ice work. 

3. Created the Limousine Dictograph used almost 
exclusively on chauffer driven private cars. 

4. Created light weight sensitive head sets and mi- 
crophones used by U. S. air forces. 

5. Created the Acousticon, the first portable electric 
hearing aid, and has made and sold more than all 
other makes combined. 

6. Created Dictograph Silent Radio, the radio re- 
ceiver that through the principle of bone con- 
duction has personalized listening. 

TRAILER DICTOGRAPH 

• Intercommunication for the trailer is not only de- 
sirable but may soon be compulsory for all trailers by 
legislation. Dictograph is ready with the Trailer 
Dictograph, providing simultaneous two-way talk 
betiveen trailer and car. The driver can talk and 
listen without taking his eyes from the road or his 
hands from the wheel. The Trailer Dictograph is a 
practical proven system that will stand up in service. 
Easily installed. 

© Dictograph Products Co.. Inc. Printed in U.S.A. 

I DICTOGRAPH PRODUCTS CO., Inc. | 

I 580 Fifth Ave., N. Y. C. . 

! n I OTO interested in the Dictograph Duo-Matic . 
. Intercommunication proposition. ' 

I n Send information on the Trailer Dictograph. I 

I Name ' 

I Firm name 

I Address City ■ 

I n I am a wholesaler. □ / am a retailer. , 



March, 1937 



mamm 



Bettk Davis starriiifj in 
W'anier liros. MARKED WOMAN 








The Leader in the Intercommunicating 
Field has a profit, making plan for alert 
Dealers and Distributors! 



DICTOGRAPH IN THE MOVIES 

• Dictograph has been used in hundreds of moving 
pictures. Fourteen pictures now in production in 
Hollywood show either Executive or Staff Stations in 
actual use. Hollywood, sparing no expense to make 
every scene mirror life, invariably shows Dictograph 
Intercommunicating Systems in business offices, 
homes and other scenes where the symbol of modern 
intercommunication logically belongs. 




DICTOGRAPH, the oldest and best known firm in the 
intercommunication iield, for the first time in its history 
offers a proposition to the radio trade. 

This proposal centers around our new, proven Duo-Matic 
Intercommunicating System — a two-station system that pro- 
vides genuine intercommunication with the all-essential fea- 
ture of two-way talk. In addition to the immediate profits to 
be made from the sale of Duo-Matic, you are also offered an 
opportunityWiY/iouf investment to profit from sales of our 
larger models that result directly from your own eilorts. 
These include both the Dictograph Junior with one Executive 
and four or six staff stations — and the famous custom-built, 
larger Dictograph systems now being used by leading Amer- 
ican firms, the Federal Government, hospitals, schools, etc. 

Thus, Dictograph offers you intercommunication profits 
from equipment that satisfies the needs of all — from the small- 
est to the largest user. 

GENUINE INTERCOMMUNICATION— Do not confuse 
the Dictograph Duo-Matic with toy devices now being olfereii 
for intercommunication. Dictograph provides simultaneous 
two-way talk without the use of any listen-talk key— and 
no intercommunication is genuine without this feature. Die- 



f 




A. Pat O'Bbien a 

BEVEBLV HOBHITS 

Wanwr Bros. »'" 
China CLrppw 

B. WIMABD B""* 

SOX and Wam B" 
m CohimU" »l" 
THE Man WHO l»< 

TWICK 






C. Chesteb 
and WALUCt 
in coliimiia P"" 
I PiioiiisE ™ 



Radio Today 



tograph offers loud-speaking without tubes or any other 
typical radio-operating expenses. Dictograph systems assure 
absolute privacy. There is no all-day current drain — for Duo- 
Matic, like your doorbell, operates eight to twelve months on 
a few dry cell batteries. Duo-Matic is always ready for im- 
mediate action — day or night. In short. Dictograph Duo- 
Matic is genuine telephone equipment — smartly styled, 
sturdily constructed, and soundly engineered for long years of 
trouble-free service. 

ABIG WAITING MARKET- The market for Dictograph 
Duo-Matic is vast and unscratched. Doctors, Dentists, small 
ofiices, stores, shops and countless homes will buy practically 
on sight. (And don't forget the "traffic value" of the Duo- 
Iflatic; it draws folks into your store.) But that's just the be- 
ginning of your opportunity. You can build substantial extra 
profits with the entire Dictograph line through the sensa- 
tional proposition we have waiting for you. 

NATIONWIDE ORGANIZATION— Dictograph backs your 
effort by a long-established engineering sales and service or- 
ganization with branch offices in 18 key cities. No other firm 
knows as much about intercommunication because no other 
firm has built so many installations. 

SALES COOPERATION- We have a complete sales help 
service ready for you: Advertising folders, newspaper mats, 
window displays featuring famous stars of the silver screen, 
and Dictograph sales stimu-letters. National advertising in 
newspapers and publications is planned for early appearance. 
WRITE FOR THIS SENSATIONAL PROPOSITION— 
"'"''^"'"'^"'nication is definitely a part of the activities of 
ery radio dealer. Before you make any plans for your de- 
Mati "'h sure to get the full story of the Dictograph Duo- 
ic and the other facts in this truly sensational oroposition. 
mail^°"i.^ provided for your convenience. Fill it in and 
mail immediately. 

58o?«5J°^'^^P" PRODUCTS CO., INC 

fim Avenue New Y0rk. N. Y. 

March, 1937 



DICTOGRAPH 

1. Created ffie loud speaker. 

2. Created the Detective Dictograph, the sensltlva 
microphone wldefy used h police work. 

3. Created fhe Lifnouslne Dictograph used a/most 
exclusively on chauffer driven prlvafe cars. 

4. Created llghf weight sensitive head sets ond mi- 
crophones used by U. S. air forces. 

5. Created fhe Acoustleon, the first portable electric 
hearing aid, and has made and sold more than afi 
other makes combined. 

6. Created Dictograph Silent Radio, the radio r«- 
ceiver that through the principle of bone con- 
duction has personailied listening. i 

TRAILER DICTOGRAPH 

• Intercommunication for the trailer is not only de- 
sirable but may soon be compulsory for all trailers by 
legislation. Dictograph is ready with the Trailer 
Dictograph, providing simultaneous two-way talk 
between trailer and car. The driver can talk and 
listen without taking his eyes from the road or his 
hands from the wheel. The Trailer Dictograph is a 
practical proven system that will stand up in service. 
Easily installed. 

© Dictograph Products Co., Inc. Printed iti U.S.A. 

I DICTOGRAPH PRODUCTS CO., Inc. I 

I 580 Fifth Ave.. N. Y. C. ■ 

j QZ am interested iri the Dictograph Duo-Matic . 
j hiterco7nviunication proposition. ! 

I n-Senrf information on the Trailer Dictograph. I 

I Firm name ■ 

I Address City ■ 

! D^ fl'" (^ wholesaler. Q/ am a retailer. . 

3 




Number 2 
RCA VICTOR'S MAGIC BRAIN 

Magic Brain eliminates interference,] in- 
sures more stations, better tone, easier 
tuning. Silver-plated copper-band coil 
system now gives even better perform- 
ance than previously. The first radio fre- 
quency stage used even in D-band ahead 
of first detector, has the "Watchman 
Tube," which guards programs against 
noise and interference, and supercharges 
them four times. 



THESE 24 EXCLUSIVE RCA VICTOR FEATURES ALSO MEAN 
FEWER "FIRST YEAR", NON-PROFIT SERVICINGS 




RCA VICTOR MAGIC VOICE MODEL 
9K3. A price leader in the quality class 
. . . with Magic Brain, Magic Eye and 
Metal Tubes. 



Magic Voice; Magic Brain; Magic 
Eye; Metal Tubes; Worldwide Re- 
ception; Super-Fidelity Speakers; 
Higher Fidelity Tone System; 
Duo-plane Speaker Mountings; 
Tone Compensation; Dynamic 
Expansion; Micro-tone Control; 
Music-Speech Control; Beam 
Power Amplifiers; Antenna Wave 



RCA Victor wants to help you 
make more money. Why? Because 
by so doing, you can help RCA 
Victor make more money. 

We sincerely think that by giv- 
ing you the details concerning RCA 
Victor's 24 features for finer per- 
formance ... by urging you to tell 
your prospects about these features, 
just as we tell you about them . . . 
that you can sell more RCA Victor 
radios — and sell them faster and 
easier! Because these features are 
not mere claims. They are facts that 
prove beyond question the extra 



Traps; Built-in Antenna Coup- 
lers; Automatic Volume Control; 
Permanent Adjustment; Stabi- 
lized Oscillator Circuit; Rubber 
Floated Chassis and Condensers; 
Selector Dial; Band Spreaders; 
Edge Lighted Dial; Record 
Player Connections; Magnificent 
Cabinets. 



l»~, 



quality built into RCA Victor 
radios. And if you point out these 
features to your prospects — Wi4 
about them — they'll prove more 
convincing than ten thousand 
fancy claims. 

Note the 24 features shown on 
this page. Read all about the one 
"spotted." If you didn't get the 
information previously published 
here on Feature Number 1, let us 
know and we'll send it to you. 
Keep these and subsequent pages on 
hand. Study them. Use them. They'll 
prove welcome selling aids to you. 



RCA ALL THE WAY 

Most broadcasting equipment is built by 
the Radio Corporation of America. Most 
power on the air is RCA installed. The 
newest RCA Victor sets keep the thread 
of RCA quality unbroken from the micro- 
phone to you. They bring your customers 
reception to match the fidelity with which 
RCA equipment and NBC engineering 
put programs on the air. 



RCA presents the "Magic Key of RCA" 
every Sunday 2 to ^ P. M., E. S. T. on NBC Blue Network 




RCA MANUFACTURING CO., INC. • Camden, New Jersey 
A Service of the Radio Corporation of America 



Radio Today 




BUSINESS REPLY CARD 

First Class Permit No. 22273 (Sec. 510 P. L. & R.) New York, N. Y 



RADIO TODAY 



480 LEXINGTON AVENUE 

NEW YORK, N.Y 




Send me RADIO TODAY for the period indicated below:' 

Q 1 Year (12 issues) $1.00 [J Send bill 

I I 3 Years (36 issues) $2.00 [^ Amount enclosed 



Name 



Title or Occupation 



Company 



Street 



City 



State 



Our Mala Line of Siis/oess Is: 



If RADIO TODAY is to be mailed to your home, fill in address here 



Your Franchise on Extra Profits 
This Summer 



A genuine air refrigerator and 
dehumidifier — self-contained — 
portable. Every Office, Home, 
Hotel, Store, Hospital a prospect 
for a NORTHWIND SUMMER 
AIR CONDITIONER. ^ 



f" 



"W> 



^•i-' 






The Northwind is your 
i-A.i'J most important item 
for additional profits 
• this year. It is "made 
to order" for your sales organi- 
zation. It is easier to install than 
a radio. Air cooled, no plumb- 
ing connections necessary. It 
requires no special knowledge 
of air conditioning equipment 
or servicing. Motors, compres- 
sor and coils are standard, sim- 
ple and fool proof. Thoroughly 
tested in domestic and foreign 
markets and by the Electrical 
Testing Laboratories. Fully 
guaranteed for one year. 

The Northwind cools — de- 
humidifies — washes and quietly 



circulates 300 cubic feet of air 
a minute. It is HALF THE 
PRICE, HALF THE SIZE, 
HALF THE WEIGHT. Can be 
carried easily from room to 
room. At its low list price of 
S175, the Northwind will out- 
sell any summer air conditioner 
in your territory. Liberal dis- 
counts assure large profits. 

Territorial allocations and 
franchise agreements are now 
being arranged. Hundreds of 
dealers are already taking ad- 
vantage of this unusual oppor- 
tunity. Mail the attached cou- 
pon for complete information. 
There are greater profits for you 
in the cool air of a Northwind. 



Pleasantaire Corporation 

304 EAST 45TH STREET • NEW YORK CITY 

CABLE ADDRESS: CARMUSE NEW YORK CITY U.S.A. 



Tear Off Coupon 

and mail today for complete infor- 
mation on franchise and discounts. 



P,easan.aire CorP°ra,i.n 

304 East 45th Street . New 

A me complete informauon 
Please send me ^mp p jitioner. 
o„ Northwind Summer A.r Cond 



STBEET 
CITY 

RADIO DEALER 
BEFK1GER-4TOR DEALER 



STATE. 

^TRIBVTOR 

DISTRIBVT()R_ 



RT-37 



March. 1937 




REMOTE UNIT. Provides instant two-way conversation 
with Master Control Unit. You can speak ... or hear 
. . . from any point in the room. No need to stop what 
you are doing to use the PHILCO PHONE. Compact 
walnut cabinet — 6J^" high, 6^" wide, ZYa" deep. 



IM CrOINe 

TO PUT 

PHILCO PHONE 

IN MY HOME, 

TOO ! 




MASTER CONTROL UNIT. Combination speaker- 
microphone permits instant conversation with one or all 
Remote Stations at will. A turn of the volume knob 
sends the voice to the Remote Units as LOUD or as low 
— as desired ! Red Signal hght on Master Control Unit 
shows when system is turned on, ready for use. Encased 
in compact, attractive walnut cabinet, size S^'^/io" high, 
10^" wide, SYs" deep. 



PHILCO'S PRIVATE TWO-WAY 
COMMUNICATION SYSTEM 
NATION-WIDE SUCCESS! 



WE KNEW there was a big market for 
PHILCO PHONE ... but we never re- 
alized how big it was going to be! But when 
Philoo distributors and dealers got their iirst 
glimpse of PHILCO PHONE ... we got the 
first indications that sales were going to hit 
landslide proportions! 

Orders came thick and fast. Every comer 
of the country joined in the demand. Thou- 
sands upon thousands of offices, factories, 
stores, theatres, restaurants, garages . . . and 
homes . . . had apparently just been waiting 
for a chance to buy a reliable, strictly pri- 
vate, time-saving inter-communication sys- 
tem at the right pzice. Now they were not 
only offered the right price . . . but the right 
name . . . the name they all knew . . . Philco! 

Dealers have found the "ready and wait- 
ing" market for PHILCO PHONE is almost 



unlimited. And they have found that 
PHILCO PHONE sales are all profit. No 
costly installation to make ... no servicing 
problems. Anyone who can make a few sim- 
ple connections can put PHILCO PHONE 
into operation. It operates on AC or DC . . . 
has Underwriters' approval . . . requires no 
inspection. 

Philco quality . . . Philco standard radio 
parts throughout . . . and a real Philco prod- 
uct that has all the prestige of the Philco 
name. Get in touch with your Philco dis- 
tributor! He has complete merchandising 
plans . . . window displays . . . folders . . . 
everything to help you clean up with 
PHILCO PHONE. 



$4950 



FOR TWO STATIONS 
ADDITIONAL STATIONS $10 EACH 



PHILCO RADIO & TELEVISION CORPORATION 



Radio Today 



MH U ld37 



Staff- 



Darrell Bartee 
Randall R. Irwin 
M. H. Newton 
B. V. Spinetta 
Vinton K. Ulrich 



Lee Robinson 

Sales Manager 



RADIO 
T O DAY 



Orestes H. Caldwell 
Editor 

M. Clements 
Publisher 

Copyright 1937 

Caldwell-Clements. Inc. 

480 Lexington Ave. 

New York. N. Y. 

Tel. PLaza 3-1340 



Vol. III. No. 3 



UNFAIR TO PESSIMISTS 

* Sittei's-down, walkers-out and 
miscellaneous hangers-on. in spite of 
everything, have hiked the wage lev- 
els of this country. If you want, you 
can say that their methods are rough 
and shabby, hut still the purchasing 
power is sharply upped. Add the vol- 
untary increases that dozens of big 
outfits have put through, and the 
prospect is splendid indeed for radio 
buying power. 

Estimate is that 1,000,000 workers 
have benefited in the last two weeks. 
Enough for manufacturers in many 
lines to hoist advertising budgets in 
an effort to get in on extra buying 
power. 

For the radio dealer this means im- 
mediate markets for more sets. 



NEW RADIO LINES FOR 
RADIO DEALERS 

* Rapid rise of trade interest in 
new intercommunicating systems 
using tube amplifiers, suggests that 
here is start of new additional asso- 
ciated lines for radio dealers. 

Radio manufacturers have looked 
with concern on the increasing pres- 
sure put on electric refrigerator sales 
by radio trade, and have wondered 
what ultimate effect will be on radio 
sales. Now along comes new inter- 
communicating apparatus with radio 
tubes and parts, highly appropriate 
for the radio man to sell and to 
service. 

Trend may be thus back to com- 
plete and exclusive radio merchants 
who will specialize in radio-tube de- 
vices, including radio sets, phono- 
graphs, electronic musical instru- 
ments and organs, intercommunicat- 
ing sets, sound equipment, and even- 
tually television. 

Some of the new intercom, sys- 
tems are being marketed only to re- 
tailers who order a required number 
of radio sets. This helps to move 



radios; also has the effect of keeping- 
intercoms in radio channels. A com- 
plete listing of intercommunicating 
systems, with specifications, appears 
on page 32. 

JUNE IN CHICAGO 

* Altogether brisk and beautiful 
rings the note of optimism through- 
out further plans for the radio parts 
manufacturers' National Trade Show, 
June 10 to 13. Seems that all of the 
130 available booths are practically 
traveled into. 

Success and to spare, say three of 
the show oificials, eyeing the show 
progress from different angles. "In 
a very short time," says Managing- 
Director Ken B[athaway, "I will have 
to start telling exhibitors that there 
is no more space left." 

Ralph Hill. Ohmite sales managev, 
reports on interest among jobbers, rep- 
resentatives and servicemen : "ISTot 
only are the bosses coming, but they 
are planning to bring their service- 
men and employes along with them." 

Arthur Moss, show secretary and 
Electrad president : "In addition to 
the regular group of exhibitors, I am 
glad to see many of the raw-material 
suppliers included in the listing.'' 



PRICE RANGES OF RADIO 

* The editors of Radio Tod.w 
have been making a compilation of 
retail-price ranges in sets now most 
popular on the market, and from an 
analysis of nearly two million set 
sales, have derived the accompanying- 
chart. Lines studied were widely rep- 
resentative of the present radio indus- 
try, in both the low and high brackets. 

It will be noted that the most pop- 
ular range — $50 to $70 — indicated by 
this survey, confirms the $55 average 
retail price reported by the Electric 
Institute of Washington, D. C, which 
compiles all radio sales made monthly 
in the capital city (see p. 9, February 
issue). 

WEEK SHALL BE FILLED 
WITH MUSIC 

* Whether it's modest or master- 
ful, droves of young people in this 
country are enjoying a romantic ad- 
venture with musical training. The 
charm of self-created music is some- 
thing that steals early into our home, 
is inclined to linger. 

National Music Week Committee 
surveyed the situation, found that 
"wlien this preliminary training period 




March, 1937 




David Sarnoff, president RCA, and general chairman for Music Week, mugged 
between masters of music and millions, Walter Damrosch and John D. Rocke- 
feller, Jr. National Music Week is scheduled for May 2 to 8. 



has passed, no further opportunity for 
development presents itself to thou- 
sands of those young people." Appro- 
priately then, Music Week for this 
year, announced for May 2 to 8, dedi- 
cates itself to the theme, "Foster 
Local Music Talent." 

Radio is involved, because of the 
appreciation studies that are regu- 
larly broadcast, and because of its 
super-distribution of the world's finest 
music. Networks will make a special 
broadcast series out of the Maytime 
event. 

David Sarnoff, EGA chief, is gen- 
eral chairman for Music Week and 
says that "our special concern this 
year will be to create opportunities 
for continued musical activity by 
young people." 

HOW MUCH THEY HAVE 
FOR SPENDING 

* The District of Columbia and 
three states had a per capita income 
in excess of $600 in 1985, according 
to the K'ational Industrial Conference 
Board. Per capita income in the Dis- 
trict of Columbia was $966. :N"ew 
York had a per capita income of 
$697; Connecticut, $607, and Califor- 
nia, $605. 

In seven states per capita income 
in 1985 was between $500 and $600. 
This group included Delaware with 
a per capita income of $592; Nevada, 
$545; Massachusetts, $539; Wyom- 
ing, $526; New Jersey, $512; Arizona, 
$505, and Illinois, $500. 

There were eleven states in 1935 in 
which per capita income was under 
$300. These were chiefly in the south- 
eastern section of the United States. 
The states in this group and their 



8 



per capita incomes in 1935 were : 
South Dakota, $275; North Dakota, 
$260; Oklahoma, $259; Georgia. $253: 
North Carolina, $252; Kentucky, 
$240; Tennessee, $252; South Caro- 
lina, $224; Alabama, $189; Arkansas, 
$182, and Mississippi, $170. 

SALES SCENE 

* De luxest item to come from 
the radio sales front is pictured on 
Radio Tod.\t^s cover this month. It 
shows how women shoppers are se- 
duced onto a radio sales floor by the 
use of broadcast appeal. 

Radio Manager E. Dykes of the M. 
O'Neil Co., big department store in 
Akron, Ohio, found that many women 



were following the NBC broadcast, 
"The Story of Mary Marlin." Mr. 
Dykes went to work. 

"Just prior to 12 :15 each day we 
arrange ample seating capacity in the 
way of radio benches, chairs, etc. Sev- 
eral of our better radios are tuned 
in on this broadcast, with the result 
that we have many listeners in the 
department during the program. 

"Many additional sales of radios, 
radio benches and radio ornaments 
have been made because of this cour- 
tesy. The picture gives you an idea 
of the number of shoppers that fol- 
low the broadcast." 

FIGURED VENEERS, 
LIGHTER FINISHES 

* Perry F. Hadlock, commercial 
engineer of the G-E Radio Division, 
Bridgeport, Conn., visited the recent 
Furniture Shows in Chicago and 
Grand Rapids to observe style trends 
in cabinets. 

"Much of the styling," said ilr. 
Hadlock, "was in the modern trend 
and some designs followed the lead 
of radio-cabinet design in using the 
rollover top to a much greater de- 
gree. 

"While radio ver.y often has taken 
its styling trends from the furniture 
industry, here is one case wliere radio 
has really led the way," stated Mr. 
Hadlock. "The new rollover top is 
now being used in many pieces of 
conventional house furniture." 

Another trend noted was more ex- 
tensive use of figured veneers and 
especially lighter finishes than were 
used in radio cabinets last year. 




Arthur Moss, president of Electrad, lays finance plans for the National Radio 
Parts Show, of which he is secretary-treasurer. Note date, Chicago, June 10-13. 

Radio Today 




Burton Browne, of Ford, Browne & Mathews, Eddie Riedel, Raytheon general 

sales manager, and Earl Dietrich, Raytheon jobber sales manager, hold a sales 

conference on a Chicago street corner. 



100% EMPLOYMENT BY 1940! 

■*■ Declared herewith is a state of 
roar and gaiety iu business activity, 
bound to liave repercussions on radio 
sales. National Industrial Confer- 
ence Board says that continued in- 
crease in the total volume of produc- 
tion and trade and of output per 
man-hour at the same rate as since 
1933, with the currently prevailing 
hours of work, would require the fol- 
lowing number of workers in the 
years just ahead: 

1937 4.5,5] 9.000 

193S 48,3.35.000 

1939 51.41S.000 

1940 .54.802,000 

Available workers for those years 
will be: 

1937 53,200.000 

1938 53.900,000 

1939 54,500.000 

1940 55,200,000 

And all prosperous prospects for 
radio sets ! 

LUMINOUS FACTS 

■*■ There's a deal of fuss about 
what sort of taste a network exhibits 
during the hours which advertisers 
haven't bought. Observe what hap- 
pened at Columbia during the year 
just past: there wei'e 12,419 sustain- 
ing programs presented, of nearly 10 
different types. 

More than 1.000 were listed as out- 
standing music; over 900 as adult 
education; over 500 as children's pro- 
grams. Civic welfare and religion 
accounted for another 500; national 
and public affairs for 300; interna- 
tional programs 300 ; news and pub- 
lic events 900; sports 200; and popu- 
lar entertainment, including drama 
and dance bands, 7,000. 



DAYTIME DRAMA 



* Some fresh truth has been 
hauled out of the latest radio audi- 
ence survey made by the Cooperative 
Analysis of Broadcasting. From in- 
formation supplied by over 161,000 
radio homes in 33 of the leading- U.S. 
cities, CAB found, among other 
things : "During daytime hours adult 
serial dramas were the most popular 
type and occupied one-half of the 



commercial network time before 6 
p.m." 

Mass of figures in this report, 
headed "Radio Audiences — May to 
September. 1936," also indicates that 
"during the summer months, there is 
a decided trend toward lighter enter- 
tainment, more time being devoted to 
dance music, novelty shows and news 
commentators than during the win- 
ter. . . ." 

NEWS BY SOUND 

* A new outfit, called Vocanews, 
with headquarters at 1770 Broadway, 
N'ew York, has announced that it will 
set up systems in 10 of the chief cities 
of the country to send music and news 
reports on telephone wires to public 
spots such as cafes, hotels and stores. 

Set-up will be similar to Muzak's 
and material put on the wires will be 
heard through loudspeakers installed 
by subscribers. Xo announcement has 
been made as to whether time will be 
sold to sponsors, but no such sales are 
made on the Teleflash, which is pro- 
moted by the same company. 

RADIO DATES AHEAD 

April 19 — Baseball Season Opens. 

May 2-8 — National Music Week. 

^fay 12 — Coronation of George VI. 

June 3 — Braddock-Schmeling Fight. 

June 10-13 — Eadio Parts Manufac- 
turers National Trade Show, 
Hotel Stevens, Chicago. 




S. T. Thompson, Pilot's vice-president, awards CBS a medal of merit, and a 

scroll to its president, William Paley, who a few days later was adjudged by 

America's tailors to be radio's best-dressed man. 



March, 1937 



Here's your practical review oF the new Fair-trade laws as they now stand 

SPRING CLEANING HITS RADIO 



• PEICE CLIPPEES in radio 
must today Iceep an eye on the law- 
makers. 

Legal dynamite started with the 
Eobinson-Patman law, and now a 
good share of the 48 states are busy 
with regulations of their own. Few 
persons in the business possess any- 
thing that resembles a halo, so the 
clean-up should be lively. 

Let John W. Van Allen, general 
counsel for the Eadio Manufacturers 
Association, be the spokesman. His 
legislative memorandum on resale 
price maintenance is pi-e-e;Ue.l in 
part herewith. 

"The proponents of re-sale price 
maintenance legislation, or some of 
them, apparently despairing of secur- 
ing relief from Congress, entered into 
the plan of having enacted by indi- 
vidual states the so-called Fair Trade 
Laws, permitting re-sale price main- 
tenance of branded, labeled or trade- 
marked merchandise. 

"Sixteen states have already passed 
such Fair Trade Laws, and in twenty 
states bills of a similar nature are 
pending. In those states in which 
valid laws have been passed, it is 
possible to have re-sale price mainte- 
nance in intrastate business, because 
these laws permit it, but it is impos- 
sible to have it in interstate business, 
because it is prohibited by the Anti- 
Trust Laws. 

Supreme Court O. K. 

"Of the Fair Trade Laws passed in 
the si.xteen states, the California law 
and the Illinois law were declared 
valid by the courts of those states, 
and as to those two state laws, the 
United States Supreme Court has de- 
cided that they are not contrary to the 
Federal Constitution. 

"In New York State practically the 
same law was declared by the New 
York Court of Appeals as invalid 
therein, because contrary to the Due 
Process clause of its constitution, and 
also declared by that court as con- 
trary to the Due Process clause of the 
Federal Constitution. 

"Since the New York decision, the 
United States Supreme Court decided 
the California and Illinois cases in 
which it declared that these laws were 
not contrary to the Due Process clause 
of the United States Constitution. 



"In the New York case, the New 
York Court considered the law as 
making a merchant boimd by statute 
to a contract to which he was not a 
party. 

"In the California and Illinois 
cases, the United States Supreme 
Court distinguished between articles 
of trade identified by patent, copy- 
right, trademark, grant or similar de- 
vices and articles of like character not 
so identified, and held that while one 
might own an unbranded, unlabeled 
or untrademarked commoditv and 
subject it to sale, he has no right to 
sell the trademark or brand or label 
or name, and that where, knowing the 
restrictions on such a sale, he adver- 
tises or offers for sale and sells the 
combined commodity and label, brand 
or trademark, he can be guilty of un- 
fair competition and can be subjected 
to suit for damages by any person 
injured thereby without violating the 
Federal Constitution. 

"Whether the New York court will 
follow its previous decision or the de- 
cision of the United States Supreme 
Court if a new case arises by a pro- 
ducer who has a uniform system of do- 



THESE AFFECT YOU! 

1 . All manufacturers may be forced 
to take a stand on price main- 
tenance on their merchandise. 

2. Private brands are likely to flour- 
ish if producers fix retail prices on 
trade-marked goods. 

3. Practice of fixing retail prices may 
settle on single figures, or on 
maximums and minimums. 

4. Misleading advertising will be 
watched closely as a result of the 
new emphasis on general fair 
trade practice. 

5. Retailers may face a new set of 
special taxes levied to support 
fair trade commissions and ad- 
ministrative bodies. 

6. Public good will toward nation- 
ally advertised radios will now be 
regarded more than ever as dis- 
tinct property. 



ing business by means of fair trade 
contracts and not a single contract 
only, remains uncertain. 

"The conclusion is that similar Fair 
Trade Laws enacted by states are 
valid therein if not contrary to the 
Constitution of those states, as they 
do not violate the Federal Consti- 
tution. 

"Speaking of the trends — will the 
Fair Trade policy in intrastate com- 
merce, as indicated in these state laws, 
be reflected in an Act of Congress, 
or will we continue to have a prohibi- 
tion by Congress of the principles of 
these laws in interstate commerce? 

Federal law? 

"We look to the records of Congress 
for an answer and we find that the 
Tydings-Miller Bill, drawn to permit 
resale price maintenance on a na- 
tional scale on nationally branded, 
labeled and trademarked merchandise 
in interstate commerce where per- 
mitted by state laws. 

"We will not here enter upon a 
discussion of whether Eesale Price 
Maintenance Laws, in interstate com- 
merce and intrastate commerce, are 
desirable or not, as there are pro- 
ponents of these laws who strongly ad- 
vocate them and opponents who as 
strongly disagree. We are discussing 
trends. We find the trend in sixteen 
important states has resulted in the 
enactment of State Fair Trade Laws 
and consideration by twenty other 
State Legislatures. We find retail es- 
tablishments, particularly in the de- 
partment store field, manifesting de- 
termined opposition to such laws for 
either intrastate or interstate trans- 
actions. We find some makers of 
nationally labeled, branded and trade- 
marked goods opposed arid some favor- 
ing the principle of these Acts. We 
find an argument being used that 
many makers of nationally branded 
goods have not availed themselves of 
the Fair Trade Laws of the states 
and hence they have not had gen- 
eral acceptance. 

"To the contrary, we find the argu- 
ment being used that makers of na- 
tionally branded goods have not done 
so because of increased taxation in 
the states and the necessity of doing 
business through a branch or other- 
(Coniinued on page 62) 



10 



Radio Today 



LISTENERS ON 



WHEELS 




ANY ADULT within the driver-family circle can be a prospect for the many-featured 1937 car receivers. 




TODAY'S DASH is designed so that parts of it can be neatly and FLEETS of trailers and boats are added to 
simply replaced or filled up by radio controls, chassis and speaker. likely spots for auto radio installations. 





FINE FITTINGS and full-matched custom VOLUME in both dollars and demonstrations is ready for the auto-radio 
controls are part of the modern appeal. dealer who finds a place for slick display jobs readied by manufacturers., 



March, 1937 



11 



RADIO BUSINESSES THAT MAKE MONEY 

Dealers invited to co-operate in setting up yardsticks For profitable selling 



* WHAT does it really cost to sell 
radio receivers at retail? 

What is a fair measure of net profit 
for the radio dealer? 

How much should be spent for sales 
help — for overhead — for management 
salaries ? 

What is the actual cost to the re- 
tailer of the radio merchandise he 
sells? 

What percentage of radio sales are 
made for cash, on open account, and 
on the installment plan? 

How much should profitable radio 
businesses spend on rent, on adver- 
tising ? 

Nobody knows 

These questions and many others 
equally vital to the radio dealer's busi- 
ness no one has been able to answer. 
Definite information has not been 
available to show what these "yard- 
sticks" of successful radio selling 
should be. Radio dealers, radio dis- 
tributors, radio manufacturers have 
all thrown up their hands when it 
comes to citing actual radio selling 
costs applicable to the present time. 

Now Radio Today has gone out to 
get the answers — to set up yardsticks 



of sound merchandising in radio busi- 
nesses of various volumes, and for 
different sections of the country, so 
that the radio dealer, whatever the 
size of his business, can have actual 
facts in dollars, cents, and percent- 
ages, by which to compare his own re- 
tail operations. 

To five thousand of the most active 
radio dealers in the nation have gone 
out question-blanks like that repro- 
duced opposite. These blanks have 
been timed to reach radio merchants 
just as they are finishing making up 
their Federal income-tax reports, and 
so have all necessary information con- 
veniently available. 

You can AeVp, too 

These five thousand dealers, scat- 
tered throughout the 48 states, will 
provide a widely distributed back- 
ground of information sources. But 
the survey is not limited to these par- 
ticular dealers who have been sent 
question-forms by mail. 

Any dealer-reader of Radio Today 
is invited to take part in the survey 
by answering the questions shown in 
the form opposite, and sending in his 
replies on a separate sheet of jaapev. 



HOW MUCH 

I For SALARY 
For SALES MEM 
For RENT f 

ForADVERXISH 
ForNETfR^ 





12 



Cost and profit figures supplied in this 
way will be held in confidence, of 
course, and will entitle the dealer 
contributing them to an advance com- 
pilation of figures covering his partic- 
ular group, without waiting for the 
publication of the general cost studies 
in the pages of Radio Today itself. 

Merchandising authorities 

Co-operating with the editors of 
Radio Today in making the present 
yardstick survey are the officials of 
the famous School of Retailing of 
New York University, New York 
City, of which Dr. Norris A. Brisco 
is dean. Dr. Brisco and his associate. 
Dr. J. W. Wingate, associate professor 
of marketing, have reviewed the ques- 
tion-forms on retail radio costs and 
have made many valuable suggestions. 
Under Dr. Brisco's direction will be 
carried out the analysis of the cost 
figures received. 

The School of Retailing of New 
York University is widely known 
among merchants as the leading 
school of the country in matters of 
merchandising methods and practice. 
D'r. Brisco has the active support of 
the great retail firms of the metro- 
politan area in making his courses of 
the utmost practical value to students 
of retailing. Outstanding merchan- 
dising executives, whose incomes 
reach into six and seven figures an- 
nually, freely give of their time in lec- 
turing before the School of Retailing 
and in consultation with Dr. Brisco in 
curriculum planning. 

Getting the facts 

With definite facts on radio retail 
costs in hand, dealer-readers of Radio 
Today will have information of the 
most incalculable value for guidance 
of their own businesses. Again and 
again, studies of successful mercantile 
businesses have shown that thorough 
examination of all available data on 
the actual cost of doing business, and 
of speciiic sources of profit, supply the 
most effective tools to combat business 
weaknesses. A knowledge of the facts 
about a business situation creates self- 
reliance in the mind of the dealer and 
stimulates confidence — the most effec- 
tive means for promoting sales and 
meeting competition. 

Radio Today will be ready with this 
basic information, presenting its cost 
studies in coming issues. 

Radio Today 



QUESTIONNAIRE WHICH WAS MAILED OUT TO THOUSANDS OF IIADIO DEALERS IN 

RADIO TODAY'S SURVEY OF RADIO SELLING COSTS AND PROFITS 

MR. RADIO DEALER: 

You are invited to take part in this nation-wide study of the cost-of-doing-business in retail selling of 
radio sets and supplies. 

Information which you contribute will be treated in confidence, and used only for the compilation of 
averages. 

In return for your cooperation in supplying your figures, RADIO TODAY will send you, with its com- 
pliments, complete compilation of average costs of similar businesses. 

O. H. CALDWELL— Editor RADIO TODAY 



1 . My Sales of Radio in 1 936 were $_ 

(gross sales minus returns, etc.) 

2. Opening Inventory of Radio^ Jan. 1 , 1 936 $_ 

(at cost, unless otherwise noted) 

3. Radio Merchandise Purchased during 1936 $_ 

4. Closing Inventory of Radio, Dec. 31 , 1 936 $_ 

(at cost, unless otherwise noted) 

5. My principal line of business is 

and Radio Sales are per cent of my total business 

6. Expense of handling sales during 1936 

a. Salaries of owners or officers $ 

b. Employees' salaries and wages $ 

c. Rent $ 

d. Advertising $ 

e. Light, heat, telephone $ 

f. Free servicing during guarantee period, delivery, installation $ 

g. All other expenses $ 

Total cost of doing business $_ 

7. I operate a radio-repair or "service" department which during 1936 took 

in a total of $ 

To operate this repair department during same period, cost, not including free 

servicing of sets sold, (see 6f.) $ 

Making a net profit on repair dept. of $ 

8. My radio sales in 1936 were % of the 1935 figure. 

9. My 1936 radio sales were divided approximately 

Cash '"c, Credit 9c, and Installment sales % 



"FUGUE IN CYCLES AND BELS" 

* MK. MILLS' fine volume is 
essentially about the perception of 
musical qualities and their relation 
to present and future electrical sound 
transmitters. Assembled with great 
discernment, the material includes 
some vastly interesting reports on 
recent researches and the book wisely 
provides some idea of the direction of 



musical development in this day of 
things radio. 

"A Fugue in Cycles and Bels" is 
designed rather for musicians, and 
will be found a pleasant and valid 
treatise for experts in associated 
matters of sound production and 
transmission. Part III, titled "An 
Electrical Future For Music," is per- 
haps the most arresting section in 
point of research news, but we were 
ourselves specially intrigued by the 



book's preliminary account of how 
"an important relationship for tones 
was established between a psycholog- 
ical characteristic and a physical 
quantity." The structure of thjs part 
is exceptionally well planned. 

Mills' style makes just the right 
concession to the layman reader, and 
he never fails to make a technical ex- 
planation seem romantic and attrac- 
tive. Van Nostrand, jST. T., is publisher. 



March, 1937 



13 



GO OUT AFTER "SOUND" PROSPECTS 

With a bit of organized effort, you can make what is called a killing 



* By means of planned "sound" 
merchandising campaigns the Eadio 
Laboratories, Inc., 2217 N. 12th 
Street, Milwaukee, Wis., has built 
up a large annual volume of business 
in the "sound" equipment line, as 
well as a fine volume on radios, tvibes 
and accessories. This firm does not 
wait for the customer to come into 
the store to inquire concerning am- 
plifiers and sound truck service. 

Arnold Kaliebe, secretary, declares 
that a regular direct-mail campaign 
is the firm's biggest asset in con- 
tacting potential customers. ITeve 
is how it works : 

The firm secures a list of univer- 
sities, school boards, civic organiza- 
tions, home-coming festival commit- 
tees, political campaign headquarters, 
church and picnic committees, and 
then sends direct mail to such pros- 
pects, calling attention to the fact 
that various events can be publicized 
by using a sound system. It is point- 
ed out that where people attend an 
event in large numbers, a sound sys- 
tem is absolutely indispensable to in- 
form everyone of what is happening 
at the time it happens. 

Must sell constantly 

Very satisfactory results have been 
obtained from this kind of advertis- 
ing, states Mr. Kaliebe. Organiza- 
tions of various kinds are looking for 
ways and means to publicize their 
business but the radio dealer must 
be alert and sell these people on the 
sound system idea, if he wishes to 
secure extra profit in this field. 

Among the larger gatherings 
which the sound trucks of this firm 
have covered have been gubernato- 
rial political campaigns, celebration 
of the birth of the Eepublican party 
at Eipon, Wis., motor-cycle hill 
climbing contests in upper Michigan, 
events of national importance in 
Soldiers' Field, Chicago, North- 
western University homecoming. 
American Legion Convention and 
many other events in Wisconsin, Illi- 
ois and Michigan. 

"We send our direct mail to firms 
located in any nearby state," says 
Mr. Kaliebe, "and we get results 
from it, too." 

In the indoor field, in addition to 
constant reminders in the way of 




CHURCHES, along with schools, 
factories, etc., need sound systems. 

direct mail distributed to school and 
church authorities and funeral homes, 
industrial plants are constantly being- 
contacted for new business in the 
way of amplifier installations. In 
one steel treating plant, this firm re- 
ports having installed a system of 
eight amplifiers of special construc- 
tion, so that calls can be heard above 
the din of shop noises. 



Replacements 



Among funeral directors, Mr. Ka- 
liebe states, additions are constantly 
being made to the list of satisfactory 
installations in funeral homes, more 
than twelve now being numbered 
among the customers of this firm. 
In one of the larger funeral homes 
in Milwaukee, this company has in- 
stalled twelve amplifiers, which are 
constantly being kept at top-notch 
efficiency. Fifteen theatres in Mil- 
waukee are also on the books of this 
firm for the sale and service of am- 
plifier units. 

As improvements are made from 
time to time in sound systems and 
amplifier units, this firm, according 
to Mr. Kaliebe, is constantly contact- 



ing users by personal calls and direct 
mail, with the idea of incorporating 
new features in existing equipment, 
or the replacement of old tji^e units 
with those of later type. 

Although direct mail is usually the 
initial form of contact for new busi- 
ness, this is by no means the only 
method employed to increase the list 
of customers for this company. Per- 
sonal contact is made with all pros- 
pects, about five or six calls a day 
being made for this purpose, or about 
100 calls a month. Out of this fol- 
low-up method, Mr. Kaliebe states, 
records show that 5 per cent will 
ultimately become customers of this 
firm. 

Renting makes sales 

In many instances, Mr. Kaliebe ad- 
vises, the amplifier units are rented 
by organizations for use on special 
occasions, but the satisfactory results 
obtained frequently prompts those in 
charge to have permanent installa- 
tions made in assembly halls later 
when the budget will permit. 

Although the use of sound trucks 
for outdoor affairs is no longer in 
its infancy, this method of "broad- 
casting" never fails to attract atten- 
tion from those in attendance at 
meetings, Mr. Kaliebe declares, and 
the truck is really a good advertis- 
ing medium in itself for the firm. 

FEW PLACES WHERE SOUND 
CANNOT BE SOLD 

* To anyone who has followed the 
development of sound equipment and 
its merchandising methods, it is dif- 
ficult to look into the future of this 
business without discerning the very 
broad remunerative market for those 
jobbers, dealers, and service organiza- 
tions which make "sound" their busi- 
ness, comments John Erwood, vice- 
president of the Webster Company, 
3825 West Lake Street, Chicago. 

Mr. Erwood feels that the proper 
merchandising of sound equipment 
takes its logical path through the job- 
ber, whose functions are as a ware- 
house and advisory station as well as, 
in some cases, financial aid to the 
dealer. 

"To the dealer who expands his 
energy in the sale and service of a 



14 



Radio Today 



well-advertised, progressive product 
that is manufactured by an organ- 
ization which provides adequate dealer 
sales-promotional material, a substan- 
tial business will result," declares Mr. 
Erwood. 

''As to the best prospects for sell- 
ing sound equipment, this subject is 
too broad, and it would be easier to 
ask where sound equipment cannot 
be sold. We know of very few places. 

"To sum up, the sound equipment 
business is going through the same 
stage of development today that the 
automobile business and the radio 
business has gone through in the 
past. And if conditions exist in the 
sound equipment field today that are 
not as stable as we would like to see 
them, we must remember that we are 
in an industry that is growing tre- 
mendously fast, and one in which the 
surface has only been scratched." 



HOW DEALER CAN "CASH 
IN" ON SOUND 

* "We feel that the legitimate 
dealer and service man is the logical 
person to sell public-address equip- 
ment," declares Larry King, sales 
manager of Operadio Manufacturing 
Co., St. Charles, 111. "It is true that 
in all cases these men's activities will 
not bring them into direct contact 
with all the possible prospects in their 
localities. 

"However, by associating himself 
with other stores in the town whom 
he might contact in his regular line 
of business, the dealer can in this way 
receive additional inquiries through 
them which he can follow up and con- 
summate as sales. 

"We feel, however, that the limiting 
factor in the amount of business these 
dealers and service men can do at a 
profit is dependent entirely upon two 
very vital elements, the first one being 
their willingness and desire to go out 
and exclusively 'sell' merchandise 
rather than to try to 'build and sell.' 
Second, that after they have been out 
trying to sell merchandise, the,y must 
have absolute assurance that when the 
final sale is consummated they will 
be the ones to get the sale and will 
not be bypassed and deprived of the 
sale because the customer has been 
able to go and buy the same prodvict 
somewhere else at the dealer's cost ! 

"We feel in general that the 'sound' 
business for servicemen and dealers 
looks very encouraging," concludes 
Mr. King. "The demand and the mar- 
ket is there and it merely waits for the 
dealer and the serviceman to judi- 
ciously select the type of merchandise 



and the company with whom he wants 
to deal to assure himself that after he 
has put a lot of time and efPort on a 
prospect, he is able to 'cash in' on his 
efforts." 



EVEN WELL-KNOWN MARKETS 
BARELY SCRATCHED 

* Notice of greater opportunities 
in the sound market is given by S. 
N. Shure, of Shure Bros., 225 West 
Huron St., Chicago : 

"Even the conventional, well-known 
markets have barely been scratched. 
Hard work will 'close' these sales. 
Continuing improvement in general 
business conditions has made it pos- 
sible for many prospects who delayed 
purchases to buy now. 

"Opportunities for the application 
(if sound amplification principles are 
limited only by the imagination and 
ingenuity of the seller. 

"Every prospect for sound is ad- 
versely influenced by every poor sound 
installation that he has ever heard. 
Equipment should be sold on its 
merits and not on a basis of price 
alone. Technical advances in micro- 
phones, amplifiers, loud speakers and 
made possible the achievement of 
high quality reproduction at a mod- 
erate cost. 



''Techincal skill is still a highly im- 
portant factor in securing best results 
and the sotmd man who expects to be- 
come and remain a factor in the field 
must make a thorough study of his 
subject and keep abreast of current de- 
velopments. The individual sound en- 
gineer should realize his responsibil- 
ity to the industry for advancing the 
general level of quality of sound in- 
stallations." 



COMMERCIAL SOUND JOBS 
MUST BE RUGGED 

* Successful "sound" men must 
always keep in mind the following 
principles, declares S. Euttenberg of 
the Amperite Corporation, 561 Broad- 
way, New York City: 

"Since the number of sound instal- 
lations obtainable in any territory is 
limited, a good margin of profit must 
be made on each job. 

"Sound installations are different 
from home installations in that they 
are made for commercial purposes and 
therefore must use commercial stand- 
ards of ruggedness and reliability. 

"A business man does not tend to 
buy the cheapest material, but will 
insist on quality and reliability. He 
will also insist on service, which must 
be figured in the initial price." 




PUSHING INTERCOMMUNICATORS 

— purchasers galore for new loud-speaking phones 

— office bosses buy quickly upon demonstration 




PHILCO-PHONE. Master unit will 
handle four remote stations. Con- 
nected by twisted pair. 



NEW'PHONES" SELL ALL SEASONS, 
KEEP DEALERS BUSY 

* Radio dealers who have taken 
on the new intercommunicating phone 
systems, report that public response 
has far exceeded their expectations. 

When such intercommunicating 
phones are displayed in dealers' win- 
dows, they prove to be "traffic stop- 
pers" and bring passersby into the 
store. 

But it is those dealers who have 
outside salesmen who seem to be do- 
ing the best job of selling the new 
"talking pairs." Almost every office 
is found to be an immediate prospect, 
these salesmen report. Often, even 
the first call-and-demonstration re- 
sults in an immediate sale; in other 
cases the prospect asks to try out the 
phones for a day or two before pur- 
chasing. 

Doctors, lawyers 

Doctors, dentists, lawyers, and 
business executives prove prime pros- 
pects. In this respect, the variety 
of opportunities for radio-phone sales 
is even larger than for radios, which, 
of course, are limited chiefly to homes. 

But homes, too, are also prospects 



for intercommunicating sets — partic- 
ularly larger homes in the upper in- 
come brackets. Even in smaller 
dwellings, phones upstairs and down, 
save much up and down climbing, 
for talking between members of the 
family and for giving orders to serv- 
ants. 

"The fact that the new phones are 
not seasonable items, but have con- 
tinuous sales possibilities right on 
through the Spring and Summer 
months, makes this new line a valu- 
able adjunct for the radio dealer, in 
keeping his sales people busy through- 
out tlie year," comments 6. W. Ax- 
macher, in charge of Philco phone 
sales for the Xew York territory. 
'"Already we find ourselves way be- 
hind in filling orders I" 




CARRIER-CALL. Talks over light- 
ing lines. No other connecting wires. 
"Simply plug in and talk!" 



RE INTERCOM LICENSES, 
USES, INTERFERENCE 

* With the new loud-speaking in- 
tercommunicating systems attracting 
trade attention, radio-set manufactur- 
ers are asking whether their present 
radio-receiver licenses permit them to 
make the new pairs of talking phones. 
On this point, legal opinion seems 
definite that a radio-receiver license 
under the amplifier patents is not ap- 
plicable; that the intending. maker of 
intercommunicating phones must ap- 
ply for a special phone license, getting 
it from A. T. & T. This includes both 





DICTOGRAPH DUO-MATIC. At left, loud-speaking unit for executive's desk; 
at right, hand-phone for branches. System talks both ways without switching. 



OPERADIO inter-office set. Provides 

up to 11 stations. Connected by 

twisted cable. 



wire-connected and carrier-current 
systems. 

Already Carrier-Call, pioneer in this 
new field, has obtained its A. T. & T. 
license, according to President Levy. 
Asked about reports that radio-set in- 
terference is caused by carrier sys- 
tems, inventor Levy explained that 
while in some cases radios within a 
few feet of the wires had been affected 
by carrier-frequency harmonics, this 
difficulty has been corrected in the 
new phones, and the FCC has now 
awarded carrier systems a clean bill 
of health. Carrier-Call operation was 
recently tested successfull.v in deep 
mines, effecting communication thous- 
ands of feet underground without 
special wiring. Xew York subway 
trains have also been linked by carrier 
impulses, and music delivered to 
speeding trains. 

AND NOW INTERPHONES FOR 
AUTO TRAILERS 

* A new off-shoot of the inter- 
communicator field, of special inter- 
est to dealers handling auto-radio, is 
the new interphone for automobile 
trailers. These special pairs of bat- 
tery-phones have been developed for 
communication between the occu- 
pants of the trailer and the driver of 
the car. 

Such means of talking between the 
family in the trailer and the driver 
up front, have been found necessary 
as the result of accidents occurring 
to these trailing homes. Sometimes 
trouble develops in the trailer or its 
rolling mechanism, and the people on 
board have no wa.v of calling to the 
driver to stop. Serious accidents have 
been caused by drivers continuing on, 
in ignorance of dang'erous conditions 
in the trailer behind. 

3Iotor-vehicle officials who have 
studied this new accident problem 
have considered making intercommu- 
nicating phones mandatory on trail- 
ers. 

Already Dictograph and Transducer 
have announced special loud-speaking 
phone systems for auto-trailer use. 



16 



Radio Today 



DAILY PROMOTIONS FOR RAOIO DEALERS 

Sales ideas For Spring, as outlined by six radio merchants who tried them 



March 22-37 



22 — Try the idea of inviting good 
prospects to your own residence for 
evening demonstrations. 

23 — Ascertain the type of program 
your prospect likes best, tune in on it, 
and leave radio tuned in on same. 
Do not switch stations. Permit your 
customer to get an earful. 

24 — Display a picture of a big clock 
face, dramatizing the daily hours that 
your serviceman is available. 

25 — Choose a series of cheerfully 
colored sets, those shades appropriate 
for the Easter period, for window dis- 
play. 

26 — Collect all the manufacturers' 
sales material which has a light-col- 
ored. Spring or Easter atmosphere, 
group them in an island display. 

27 — Cash in on current plans to re- 
decorate homes at this time; offer to 
deliver cabinets until you get the one 
that's just right. 

28 — Easter Sunday. 

30 — Start a promotion among all the 
offices in your area, on combination 
radio-bars. 

31 — Check all sources for the names 
of those planning to take cottages for 



the summer; interest them in an ap- 
propriate, or portable set. 



April 1.19 



1 — Use an ad or a circular outlining 
the fun of "April ilotoring with Our 
New Auto Radios." 

2 — Use an entire wall of your shop to 
display pictures of radio stars now 
on the air. 

3 — Check with all local theaters to 
find out whether you can display new 
receivers in their lobbies. 

4 — Sunda3'. 

5 — Build a window display around 
large studio photos of all radio pro- 
grams sponsored by radio manufac- 
turers. 

6 — Pick out all prospects which are 
families, and let them know the ad- 
vantages of extra sets for children. 

7 — Choose groups of Italian, German 
or other foreign names and mail them 
appropriate broadcast schedules, do- 
mestic and short wave. 

8 — If you are advertising on the air, 
add a notice of it to your letterhead. 

9 — Start the practice of attaching 
your shop sticker to a radio fan mag- 



azine, to leave in homes where your 
free trials are in progress. 

10 — Write a note to all prospects 
whose credit you have checked, tell 
them that they may select a new set 
any time. 
1 1 — Sunday. 

12 — On a series of cards, paint sep- 
arate selling features of a new re- 
ceiver, run ribbons from these to the 
part of the set concenie I. 
13 — Introduce "The Modern Amer- 
ican Family'' in your window, show 
a receiver for each member of it. 
14 — Run an ad showing the photos 
of all members of your store staff. 
1 5 — Send all prospects a notice which 
explains all the things regarded as 
difficulties in summer radio reception. 

16 — Offer to take prospects for a ride 
in your own car, demonstrating the 
features of a new auto receiver. 

17 — Publicize the names and pictures 
of those radio entertainers who will 
remain on the air throughout the 
sunnner. 

1 8 — Sunday. 

19 — Run an ad playing up the open- 
ing of the baseball season today, ex- 
plaining what the season will mean to 
sport listeners. 



Very! Storcr, Ogallala, Neb. R. H. Ghanem, Tanta. Egypt. 




Harold Newby, Herbert & Newby Radio Fred J. Olsen. Olsen's Radio 
Service, Wichita, Kansas. Green Bay, Wisconsin. 



Edward Burton, Center Music Morris Wolf, Wolf Radio & Electric, Van- 
Stores, New York, N. Y. couver, Washington, 



March. 1937 



17 



AUTO RADIO ON SAFETY'S SIDE 



Multiple usefulness oF the car receiver is settled all over again. 



• MESSY ITEM to come up in 
the Idaho legislature last month was 
a bill to prohibit the use of auto radio 
in that state. 

Advocates of the bill had the nerve 
to advertise it as a "safety measure." 
It passed the Senate and had some 
chance of becoming a law, until a 
public hearing was held in the Idaho 
House of Representatives. 

Radio Manufacturers Association 
sprang into action and General Man- 
ager Bond Geddes rushed to Boise 
with a brief which he presented per- 
sonally at a committee hearing. Mr. 
Geddes proved that the measure would 
be unwise, unnecessary, unenforceable, 
injurious to business, and of doubtful 
validity. He cited dozens of opinions 
of public officials, and reminded every- 
body that insurance companies had 
pronounced auto radio as safe. 

Public utility 

The RMA official had the facts to 
establish the position of car radio as 
attractive and indispensable. In his 
remarks, some of which follow, are 
seen the outlines of a widely useful 
utility. 

"Automobile radio is a major factor 
in public communication, utility, con- 
venience and enjoyment. For many 
years radio has been almost univer- 
sally used and enjoyed in homes. In 
recent years there has been a growing 
demand for extension of its use in 
offices and public places, "but the larg- 
est demand within the last six or 
seven years has come from automobile 



owners. Introduced in 1930 with a 
small production of 34,000 automobile 
sets, the industry sales last year were 
about 1,500,000 of such receiving sets, 
and there are over 4,000,000 now in 
use. Also they have been universally 
adopted in law enforcement as a new 
and tremendous aid to police officials, 
national, state and local, and with 
participation and assistance from the 
public owning auto-radio. 

"Only recently in the Ohio floods 
they were of dramatic aid to police, 
Red Cross, and other relief workers. 
Automobile radio was installed in 
police and coast guard boats and con- 
tributed greatly to relief work and 
saving of human lives. 

"In the apprehension of criminals 
by police through public broadcasting, 
auto-radio has been a most effective 
weapon in the war on crime. Useful- 
ness of automobile radio, in cars of 
private citizens in police direction and 
diversion of traffic is well recognized. 
In any public emergency, such as 
floods, storms or forest fires, auto- 
radio has been used in many states 
and is similarly potential in Idaho. 



700% useful 



"Needs filled by automobile radio 
in the daily business and private lives 
of citizens also are well established 
and widely recognized. Farmers re- 
ceive crop, weather renorts and news, 
while to the business traveler and 
tourist automobile radio is especially 
welcome and valuable. 



625,000 TRAILER-HOMES, A BRAND NEW MARKET FOR AUTO RADIO 




YEAR OF TRAILERS, 1937, when they help jobbers to contact dealers who sell 
auto radio to trailer-homes. This is a slick job from Louisville, Ky. 



"Experience in actual use of auto- 
mobile radio and its manual operation 
destroy completely the apparent basis 
of this bill that it may tend to divert 
the attention of the motor vehicle 
operator and thus cause traffic acci- 
dents. We seriously and vigorously 
contend that the exact opposite is the 
fact. We contend that automobile 
radio is a safety factor, a safety ac- 
cessory of an automobile, and that its 
use tends to and actually results in 
safer driving, safer highways and re- 
duction of accidents. 

Promotes attention 

"Auto-radio for the motor operator 
and also for any passengers tends to 
promote attention, wakefulness, in- 
terest and alertness. All are safety 
factors in driving. Also automobile 
radio reduces or eliminates the recog- 
nized hazard of "backseat driving." 
It reduces disturbing conversation 
with the operator. It keep_s the occu- 
pants of the car entertained and, 
therefore, more quiet, reducing dis- 
concerting conversation. Nothing 
coming from a loudspeaker of an auto- 
radio can be is disconcerting to the 
driver as conversation or acts of oc- 
cupants which divert his attention 
from his driving job. 

"Consider the manual operation of 
automobile radio. The modern auto- 
radio set has not more than two dials 
and in some sets only one dial. It is 
installed close to the driver and gen- 
erally closer, on the steering wheel, 
than the choke or controls on the 
instrument board. Its operation does 
not divert or distract the attention of 
the driver because it requires little or 
no attention of the operator. Gen- 
erally the set is tuned in while the 
car is parked, before starting or as 
the car slowly goes into motion. 

"In the dual control set generally 
in use, the operation is entirely and 
very briefly confined to one hand. The 
set is turned on with the volume con- 
trol and the hand then passed to the 
tuning dial, involving only the use 
of one hand with the aid of the ear 
and without the use or need of the 
eyes. Less, or at least no more, effort 
is required than to operate the choke, 
starter or windshield wiper or other 
slight manual adjustment with which 
the driver also is familiar and which 
also becomes with practice largely 
automatic. 



18 



Radio Today 



"Excessive speed and reckless driv- 
ing are conceded to be the principal 
factors causing motor accidents. Auto- 
motive radio tends to and actually 
does reduce driving speed and. there- 
fore, is a safety factor. Its use is 
incompatible with high speed driving, 
either in the city or on rural high- 
ways. This has been demonstrated 
by years and wide use of automobile 



radio. Programs cannot be enjoyed 
while cars are speeding. Enjoyment 
of music, constituting 50 per cent or 
more of programs, and other broad- 
easting, naturally and automatically 
reduces driving speed. 

"Another actual safety result of 
automobile radio is that it keeps mo- 
torists alert in the operation of their 
cars and does not dull their perception 



and reactions. This is especially true 
in long periods of driving and at 
night. There are many instances of 
accidents due to drowsiness or sleepi- 
ness of the driver, particularly in the 
case of chauileurs or truck drivers. 
For this reason many owners of fleets 
of trucks have equipped them with 
auto-radio for their drivers' benefit 
and safety." 



THE EFFECT OF TURNOVER ON PROFITS 

Chart shows how delayed movement oF merchandise may turn net into loss 



* Among most retailers, the effect 
of turnover is perhaps the least 
understood of the factors having a 
vital bearing — direct and indirect — 
on profits. 

The effects of turnover are far- 
reaching. 

For the longer merchandise is kept 
in stock — the more it costs — and the 
less it is worth. 

Interest on your investment in- 
creases with time. 

Insurance costs are higher. 

Space cost for storage and display 
adds up with time. 

If assortments of new and wanted 



merchandise are also maintained — 
then your total stock must increase. 

Damage — and consignment repair 
costs rise. 

Consumer "desire to purchase" 
goes down as age of the merchandise 
increases. 

Long experience indicates that the 
"cost of merchandise"' — which in- 
cludes interest, insurance and rent — 
increases 1 per cent per month after 
the first month. And "cost of sell- 
ing" which includes markdowns — 
extra commissions — polishing and re- 
pairs — increases 2 per cent per month. 
Combined — these two factors decrease 
profits S per cent per month. 



The accompanying chart shows this 
relationship graphically. 

Cost of merchandise is taken as 54 
per cent — a 40/10 per cent discount. 

Overhead expense is 35 per cent. 

Net profits 11 per cent. 

Then see what the lack of turn- 
over does to these profits — see how 
profits soon turn into losses when the 
stock fails to be kept actively on the 
move. 

In the production of final operating 
profits — turnover is almost as import- 
ant as high sales volume. 

For safety — watch and control both 
of these important factors. 




March, 1937 



19 



TO SELL THE FASTER 

— locating some dynamite for sales talk 

— avoiding the weak and negative cracks 



* THE ALL-VEEY-WELL na- 
tional ballyhoo on radio sets is seri- 
ously discounted unless the receiver 
salesman knows exactly what to utter 
when he stands face to face with the 
consumer. 

Smart salesmen dislike the idea of 
"canned" sales talk, but a salesman's 
speech can be planned and standard- 
ized so that his performance is in- 
telligently scheduled. This advice 
comes from Tested Selling, Inc., a 
New York firm whose product is noth- 
ing else besides "tested selling sen- 
tences." Comi^any has analyzed some 
105,000 sales words and phrases and 
has tested thousands of them on 
nearly 20,000,000 persons. 

Eadio salespeople naturally inherit, 
from the nature of their merchan- 
dise, the finest selling arguments in 
the world, but these can't be delivered 
if the prospect departs after the first 
few moments. Suggestion is, then, 
that they take the hit-and-miss qual- 
ity out of their first few cracks. 



iuccess 



ful 



sentences 



Question is, what kind of opening 
remarks will seize and hold the radio 
prospect ? 

The Tested Selling experts believe 
that these sentences must be based 
upon the fact that people buy with 
their subconscious minds. Weak, un- 
organized phrases thought up on the 
spur of the moment won't do. 



Although radio receivers have in- 
sides of a technical nature, the first 
sentences should not deal with the 
technical structure of the instru- 
ments according to these rules. Theory 
is that people buy for three reasons : 
(1) Self-preservation, (2) Romance, 
and (3) Profit. Eadio merchandise 
falls under "Eomance" and therefore 
the early catch-remarks should deal 
with broadcasts rather than with cir- 
cuits. 

Price angle ditched 

Faithful attention to the matter of 
tested words has a strong tendency 
to cut the price appeal in sales con- 
versations. Mention of cut prices 
and trade-ins does not fit in with the 
planned appeal of "romance" and the 
entire set-up is designed to focus at- 
tention elsewhere. 

Eules of this game also take into 
account the fact that many of today's 
radio prospects are themselves ex- 
salespeople. They are bitterly wise 
to the whole set of tricks which super- 
trained sellers are likely to exhibit. 
They are technique-conscious to their 
finger-tips and they have to be halted 
in their preoccupation with sales 
style. 

On the other hand, if today's sales- 
men try a trick of speech which is too 
obviously a device — sentences which 
sound as if they had been figured out 
after long hours of special planning — 
the efl'ect is lost. 



Act/on notes 

Eadio men will find valuable tips in 
the methods used by Tested Selling 
on a well known vacuum cleaner. 
Companj' introduced a brand new 
model and was anxious that it should 
be presented carefully on sales floors. 

Instead of calling the gadget a 
"vacuum cleaner," it was referred to 
as a "cleaning ensemble." This was 
intended to dramatize revolutionary 
improvements, and the word "ensem- 
ble" was known to be familiar to all 
women. 

The cleaner was made of a new 
alloy, but that meant nothing to the 
average housewife until the salesman 
said that "it is one-third lighter than 
aluminum and twice as strong." 

The new model was gray in color, 
but instead of saying that it was 
"Bam Yard Gray," the Tested Selling 
officials suggested "'Stratosphere Gray, 
because Stratosphere is a word tested 
to stand for lightness and speed in 
the mind of a prospect." 

The headlight on the new cleaner 
was not called just that, because the 
phrase was too ordinary. Descrip- 
tion was "Dirt Einder" and the sales- 
man added that "it sees where it goes 
— and it's clean where it's been." 

Warning signal on the cleaner was 
not described as a "danger" or "warn- 
ing" because those are negative words. 
Eather, the salesman said that "this 
is the new Time to Empty signal." 

Many of the words which are 
needed by radio salesmen can be 
found in literature issued by manu- 
facturers. Descriptive material in 
1937 is detailed and dramatic and will 
reveal countless ideas, if not the 
phrases themselves. 




Trick sound movies like these are being exhibited in many communities to promote radio dealers' wares. At left, by double 
photography, the broadcast artist appears singing on top of the Philco set; at the right lifelike Lilliputians crowd around 

the giant Fairbanks-Morse radio. 



20 



Radio Today 




EVERY CAR OWNER IS A PROSPECT FOR 



Po.eriul -Pfto:-t drain. ^^^ ^^,euua g^e. 
^ V par baltery. ^^ ^ on core - ^^ ^ ^p 

avnamic and pe ^^^^^ ^^.v^. ^ 
Dasb controls to 
Tuning optional.) 




T^ WENTY million or more car owners — ^ach and 
every one of them a potential customer for 
touch-o-matic tuning. This latest Admiral sensa- 
tion is easily installed on any car radio . . . old or 
new. Just touch a button . . . and presto! in comes 
one of your favorite stations clear as a bell. 

Streamlined, handsomely faced with chromium, 
the touch-o-matic control mechanism is easily at- 
tached to steering column. The operating mech- 
anism is housed in a compact metal case installed 
on the side of the radio. Make 1937 your biggest 
auto radio year with touch-o-matic tuning and the 
new 1937 Admiral Auto Radios. Write for details. 

CONTINENTAL RADIO & 
TELEVISION CORPORATION 

325 W. HURON ST. CHICAGO, ILL. 





^iio BAB»OS 

35: 



1 T^e.s'4-in-^ 



"^^ -^ ^* «i TO M^^*^*^ 



GAS-0-LECTRIC 
POWER PLANTS 



YOUR CUSTOMERS 
Want ELECTRICITY 

Here is an exclusive dealer-jobber line of portable 
light plants priced for quick sales and big profits. 
Tfie new RED TOP! 

A necessity on millions of farms, trailers and 
wtierever "city" electricity is not available. Provides 
instant power for electric iigfits, radios, electrical 
equipment and appliances. Combination A.C. and 
D.C. or D.C. only. Liberal discounts assure long 
profits. Mai! coupon for information at once. 

COMBINATION A. C — D. C. PLANTS 
In one plant — both 110-V., A.C, 300 watts for lighting, 
household appliances, small electric tools, pumps, etc.; 
and up to 325 watts D.C, for charging 6, 12, and 32-V., 
batteries. Prices from $89.95 up, F.O.B. Chicago, Push 
button starter. 

PEONEER GEN-E-MOTOR CORPORATION, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 




PIONEER GEN-E-N/.OTOR CORPORATION 
Dept. No. R-2C 466 West Superior Street, Chicago, Illinois 
Please send me complete information on the new RED TOP 
Gas-O-Lectric Plants, 

NAME 

ADDRESS , 

CITY ...STATE 



MAI L COU PON NOW 



TRYING TO GET BY WITH ONLY 
SIX RIDER MANUALS "( SAVED'' 
TEN DOLLARS— BUT 



is poor "economy" which prompts a 
serviceman to try and "get by" without a 
complete set of seven Rider Manuals. For the 
profit from only one additional tube sale a week, 
your set of Rider Manuals can be kept up-to-date. 
YOU NEED ALL SEVEN VOLUMES 
Vol. VII— 1600 PAGES— 
$10.00— Coverino 1934-37 
Vol. VI .... $7.50—1935-36 
. $7.50-1934-35 
. $7.50—1933-34 
. $7.50—1932-33 
. $6.50—1931-32 
$7.50—1920-31 




AllCNING PHILCO 
RECEIVERS— New! Au- 
thentic initructions for olign- 
ing ANY of tt)e 8,000,000 
Philcos, Over 160 $ 1 00 



SERVICING SUPERHETS 

Revised edition iust pub- 
liihed showj how to moke 
superheterodyne repoiri 
quickly, 288 pp,, $^00 



CATHODE-RAY TUBE 
AT WORK — Complet., 

procticol, writton for ler- 
vicemen. Information on 



336 pp. 450 ni., 
'■AN HOUR A DAY WITH RIDER" BOOKS 

ON AUTOMATIC VOLUME CONTROL will speed up your 

AVC work, 96 pp, — 65 ill, — hard cover — 60e 

ON RESONAI-ICE & ALIGNMENT, You need this I 96 pp. 

— 48 ill. — hord cover — 60c 

ON D-C VOLTAGE DISTRIBUTION IN RADIO RECEIVERS. 

How d-c voltages ore led to tube elements, etc. 96 pp. 

—69 ill,— hard cover— 60c 

ON ALTERNATING CURRENTS IN RADIO RECEIVERS — 



JOHN F. RIDER, Publisher, 1440 Broadway, N. Y. C. 




'-(Qi^em/m//i/ 



FAMOUS SINCE BROADCASTING BEGAN 

Announces ... 

A Sensational New 
Low Priced Spring Line 

With These Features 

Distinctive Eye Appeal Well Known Name 

Competitively Priced Excellent Performance 

Good Profit Margin 

Join the increasing list of 
FREED-EISEMANN boosters 




Model 28 (shown above) — 6 tube AC /DC Superheterodyne 
—has foreign short wave band ^ gets police, aircraft, 
amateur, and standard broadcasting. Model 98, similar 
to above except 5 tube set for use on AC current. 

Write for full information. Sets are priced from S14.95 to $49.95. 

FREED MANUFACTURING CO., inc. 

44 WEST 18th STREET NEW YORK, N. Y. 



22 



Radio Today 



MERCHANDISING RECORDS 



Band under dii'eotion of Lucky Millin- 
der— 3158D. 



BuUoonacy. Barrelhouse. Both by Mills 
Blue Rhythm Band — 31.56D. 



— Kvely interest in new discs 

— trends important to dealers 



DISCS FROM "SHALL 
WE DANCE" 

* Considerable interest has been 
shown in recordings from the new 
Fred Astaire-Ginger Rogers musical 
movie, "Shall We D'ance?" Last week 
in March Brunswick announces discs 
of the new tunes from the picture, 
exclusive with Mr. Astaire and 
Johnny Green. 

Music for "Shall We Dance?" was 
written by George Gershwin. Bruns- 
wick records include "Wake Up, 
Brother, and Dance," "They All 
Laughed," "Let's Call the Whole 
Thing Off," "I've Got Beginner's 
Luck," "They Can't Take That Away 
from Me" and "Slap That Bass." 

New director of advertising and 
publicity at Brunswick Record Corp., 
1776 Broadway, is Munroe Howard, 
doubtless to be an important figure 
among record officials. Mr. Howard's 
experience has been with American 
Publicity Associates, the Morton 
Freund advertising agency, and other 
outfits for whom he was ad chief. 

TWO NEW LABELS 

* A new company in the record 
field is Master Records, Inc., which 
will market "Master" and "Variety" 
records, retailing at seventy-five cents 
and thirty-five cents respectively. 
This company is owned by the Ameri- 
can Record Corp., 1776 Broadway, 
iST. Y. C, and the new brands will be 
sold through regular Brunswick chan- 
nels. Irving Mills, well known mu- 
sical publisher, is musical director of 
Master Records, Inc. 

BING REMAINS WITH DECCA 

* New term contract has been 
signed by Bing Crosby to continue 
exclusively making records for Decca. 
Company has enjoyed this arrange- 
ment since October, 1934, when the 
popular crooner first got under way 
on Decca discs. His current record- 
ing of "Pennies From Heaven" has 
had a top position on many best seller 
lists throughout the nation. 

Decca has started a series of 12- 
in. records with two popular tunes 



on each side. First of these novel 
discs (No. 15028), has Al Donahue 
and his orchestra playing "For Sen- 
timental Reasons," "It's Love I'm 
After," "When My Dream Boat 
Comes Home," and "To Mary With 
Love," with vocal choruses by Barry 
McKinley. 

FLOOR PLAN HIKES VOLUME 

* Radio store executive has made 
a report on the use of a model floor 
plan such as was presented in Radio 
Today for October, page 19. The ar- 
rangement of the store and the posi- 
tion of fijitures had the effect of "total 
sales increased 20 per cent and the 
sale of console and compact simul- 
taneously increased 50 per cent with 
a sharp decrease in overhead costs 
and consequent increase of net profit." 

Materials and colors used in the 
"Layout For a Retail Radio Store" 
need not be fancy or extravagant. 
Plan aims to present the necessary 
amount of merchandise in the neat- 
est fashion, from the standpoint of 
actual sales effectiveness. 



BEST SELLING RECORDS 
AS WE GO TO PRESS 

BLUEBIRD 



This Year's Kisses, The Girl on the 
Police Gazette. Both with Shep Fields 
and his Rippling Rhythm — B6757. 

How Could You? The Meanest Thins 
You Ever Did AVas Kiss Me. Both with 
Dolly DaT\-n and her Dawn Patrol — 
B6797. 

3Ioonliprht and Shado-*vs. Dedicateil to 
You. Both with Shep Fields and his 
Rippling- Rhythm — B6S0S. 



BRUNSWICK 

This Year's Kisses. You're Laughing 

at Me. Both with Hal Kemp and his 
orchestra — 7S12, 

I've Got My Love to Keep Me AVarni. 
Sluniniinpr on Park Avenue. Both -R-ith 
Red Xoryo and his orchestra — 7S13. 

All's Fair in Love and War. "With 
Plenty of Money and You, Both with 
Hal Kemp and his orchestra — 7769. 



DECCA 

(By titles) 

"With Plenty of Money and You, Henry 
Busse and his orchestra — 1076. Dick 
Powell — 1067. Ink Spots — 115-4. 

Good Xight, My Love. Ruth Etting — 
1107. Mai Hallet and his orchestra — 
1047. Dick Robertson and his orches- 
tra — 1131. 

This Year's Kisses, Diclv Powell — 

1149. Abe Lyman and his orchestra — 

1127. Roy Smeck and his Serenaders — 
1117. 



Stonipin' at the Savoy. Vibraphone 
Bines, Both by Benny Goodman Quar- 
tet — 25521. 

This Year's Kisses. He Ain't Got 
Rhythm, Both with Benny Goodman 
and his orchestra — 25505. 

I Can't Lose That Lougins for You. 
Boo-Hoo, Both with Guy Lombardo 
and his Royal Canadians — 25522. 



• Thomas F, Joyce, RCA-Victor 

advertising head, was tlie speaker at 
tlie Feb. 2 6th meeting of the Phila- 
delphia Chapter of the American 
Society for Metals. Subject was "The 
Revival of the Phonograph." Other 
activity on the part of Mr. Joyce was 
a recent check-up on the sales of the 
Victor "Book of the Opera." More 
than 25,000 copies of the new re- 
vised volume have been sold since 
the first of the year, which estab- 
lishes a new high for the elaborate 
526-page book. 



Serenade ii 
the Moon, 



COLUMBIA 

the Xight — tango. Me and 
Both "With vocal refrain, 
both with Mantovani and his Tipica 
orchestra — 3159D. 

Mr. Ghost Goes to Town, Algriers 
Stomp, Both by Mills Blue Rhythm 




Shep (Rippling Rhythm) Fields is on 
Victor's Bluebird best seller. 



March, 1937 



23 



NEW THINGS FROM THE MANUFACTURERS 



Fada Motosets 




■*• 1937 Fada auto radio line is com- 
prised of four models. No. 267 is a 
single-unit 6-tube model — tunes 535- 
1620 KC. Antenna and battery lead 
filtering eliminates need of sup- 
pressors. Variable tone control — 6-inch 
speaker. List $42.95. 

Type 267SD is a dual unit set with 
8-inch cowl speaker. 267SG and 267SF 
have header speakers for General Mo- 
tors and Ford cars respectively. Fada 
Radio & Electric Co., 30-20 Thomson 
Ave., Long Island City, N. Y. — Radio 

TOD.\Y. 



Howard auto radio 




ie Eight-tube receiver for autos — 
dual unit construction with 8-inch dy- 
namic speaker. Push-pull output. 
Tuning condenser with cut sections 
enabling use of high secondary induct- 
ance antenna coil. Spark filter — first 
section built against outer shell. Perma- 
nent alignment card on set permits 
alignment without control head. Model 
HA-8. Howard Radio Co., 1731 Bel- 
mont Ave., Chicago, 111. — Radio Today. 



Crosley auto sets 




type dial — custom controls. Output of 
9 watts — 8-inch speaker with special 
pressure relief, giving performance 
equivalent to large home radio. Header 
or cowl speaker. Tone control — music- 
speech switch. Model A-177 $59.50. 

Model A-167 is a 6-tube single unit 
receiver listing at $39.95. Crosley 
Radio Corp., 1329 Arlington St., Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio — Radio Today. 



Remler "Scottie" radio 



Sloping pane! set 




* New Emerson creation has acous- 
tically constructed cabinet with slant- 
ing front panel. Chassis is 6-tube AC 
—tunes 540-1750, 5600-18,000 KC. Out- 
put of 3 watts — 6y2-inch speaker. Tone 
control— AVC. Gemloid dial. I.F. 
wavetrap and power line noise filter. 
Model Z-159— list $44.95. Emerson 
Radio & Phonogi-aph Corp., Ill Eighth 
Ave., New York, N. Y. — Radio Todav. 



Amerieon-Boseh receiver 




* 7-tube dual-unit superhet employ- 
ing "G" type tubes. Requires no 
spark plug suppressors. Airplane 



* 12-tube high-fidelity console with 
automatic frequency control. Tunes 
525-18,500 KC — large etched glass tun- 
ing dial with second hand indicator — 
dual speed vernier. 12-inch speaker — 
phono terminals for record fans. Tone 
control — 42-inch high cabinet. Model 
678. United American Bosch Corp., 
Main St., Springfield, Mass. — Radio 
Today. 




* Bakelite cased receivers in ivory, 
and onyx with ivory ornamentation. 
Vertical scale dial sets new style in 
tuning. Available with several chassis 
types — No. 46 has 5 metal tubes and 
tunes broadcast and police calls. Model 
47 has AVC and tunes 540-1750, 5400- 
10,500 KC. An AC-DC model with 6 
metal tubes is also available. Remler 
Co., Ltd., Bryant at 19th, San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. — Radio Today. 

Freed-Eisemann receiver 




* AC-DC 5-tube tuned radio fre- 
quency table set — tunes 530-1820 KC. 
Dynamic speaker — illuminated blue 
and gold dial. Self-contained aerial. 
Size 12 X 81/2 x 6% inches. Model FE-24 
—list $19.95. Freed Mfg. Co., 44 W. 
18th St., New York, N. Y.— Radio To- 
day — see also advt. p. 22. 

Radoiek amplifier 

* 50-60 watt 6L6 beam power am- 
plifier. 4 individual input channels 
for crystal, velocity or other low level 
mikes. Separate phono input. Uni- 
versal output and field supply. With 




suitable speakers it will cover an out- 
door area of 65,000 square feet or in- 
door audience up to 25,000 persons. 
Radoiek Co., 601 W. Randolph St., Chi- 
cago, 111. — Radio Today — see also advt. 
p. 74. 



24 



Radio Today 




Picture shows Mr. Eddie Riedel, Ray- 
theon general sales manager; and Mr. Earl 
Dietrich, manager ofdistributor sales, photo- 
graphed with Grand Prize Sound Truck. 



WE ARE (4^ui^ JtrUUMy^l 

ALSO 500 OTHER FREE PRIZES 

It's the easiest contest ever! Just answer a simple question — an answer that every service- 
man or dealer gives to his customers two or three times a week. It may win for you this 
new V-8 service truck with a complete built-in sound system — or $600 Cash! In addition, 
the first prize winner's name and photograph will appear six weeks after the contest in our 
advertisement in the Saturday Evening Post! There are 500 other prizes you will find 
equally desirable! Learn about the Raytheon Contest today! Ask your jobber! 




RIYIHEOII mODUCIIOII COIirOilllllON 



420 leilngton Ave., New York. N.Y. 445 Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, Illinois 

55 Chapel Street. Newton, Mass. 555 Howard Street. San Francisco, Cal. 

415 Peachtree SI.. N. E., Atlanta, Ga. 



March, 1937 



25 



NEW THINGS 



Onan generators 




* streamline, fully enclosed com- 
pact AC generators. Designed for 
sound trucks, trailers, boats, summer 
camps, emergency power supplies. 
Hand and self cranking models — avail- 
able in sizes from 350 to 1000 watts. 
Extra silent muffler and exhaust pipe. 
350 watt model weighs 150 pounds. 
D. W. Onan & Sons, 43 Royalston Ave., 
Minneapolis, Minn. — Radio Today — see 
also advt. p. 74. 

ICA auto antenna 




* Airflow type antenna designed 
for steel-top cars. Supported by rubber 
suction cups — requires no drilling of 
the top. Reduces ignition and wheel 
static noise. List $3. Pole type an- 
tenna for mounting on rear bumper — 
8 feet high. List $2.50. Insuline Corp. 
of America, 25 Park Place, New York, 
N. Y.— Radio Today. 



Triumph oscillograph 




*• Low-cost oscillograph employing 
913 type cathode ray tube. Functions 
as a vacuum-tube voltmeter, resonance 
indicator, waveform analyzer, output 
meter. Practically impossible to harm 
the instrument by overloads. Linear 
thyratron sweep circuit. Uses only 4 
tubes— 80, 6A6, 885, 913. Controls 
mounted on engraved bakelite panel. 
Size 9 X 7% X 8. Model 820. Triumph 
Mfg. Co., 4017 W. Lake St., Chicago, 
111. — R.\M0 Today— see also advt. p. 59. 



Port-o-matic combination 

* Universal AC-DC portable type 
radio-phonograph combination. Rec- 
ords carried in a separate tray — pre- 
vents damage to mechanism. Tone arm 
automatically supported when top is 
closed. Copper aerial screen built in 
case. Beam power output of 3-watts. 
Lehman Radio Salon, 1013 Madison 
Ave., New York, N. Y. — Radio Today — 
see also advt. p. 60. 

Miniature panel instruments 

* New line of round and rectangu- 
lar style AC, DC, copper oxide, radio 
frequency meters. Sensitivity as great 
as 20 microamperes full scale. Type 
35. Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. Co., 
E. Pittsburgh, Pa. — Radio Today. 

Tobe mounting clips 



Universal recording machine 




■*• New Tobe electrolytics now 
equipped with mounting clips. Slits 
in the ends of the condenser permit 
the insertion of clips — will hold con- 
denser either flat or edgewise. Tobe 
Deutschmann Corp., Canton, Mass. — 
Radio Today. 

Amperite velocity mike 




■*■ Improved cable connector now 
supplied on Amperite RBMn and 
RBHn mikes. Cable connector of posi- 
tive 3-pin type. Locking ring elim- 
inates possibility of loose contacts. 
Connector on shock absorber prevents 
mechanical noises due to moving cable 
from reaching mike. Amperite Corp., 
561 Broadway, New York, N. Y. — 
Radio Today — see also advt. p. 42. 

Philco-phone 

■k Two-way communication system 
for offices, homes, stores, etc. Master 
unit will handle up to 4 remote sta- 
tions. Entire amplifier contained in 
master unit — remote units consist of 
speaker only. Easily installed — con- 
nected by a twisted pair. Speech may 
originate at either end. List — master 
and 1 remote station $49.50. Addi- 
tional stations $10. Philco Radio & 
Television Corp., Tioga & C Sts., Phila- 
delphia, Pa. — Radio Today — see also 
advt. p. 6. 




* Portable recording machine de- 
signed for school and college use — fea- 
turing simplicity of operation. Ampli- 
fier has low and high pass filter. Com- 
plete with microphone, stand, playback 
equipment, neon volume indicator. 
Housed in 16x22x9 inch case — weight 
about 50 pounds. Universal Micro- 
phone Co.. Inglewood, Calif. — Radio 
Today. 



Burgess lantern 

■*• Light-weight battery operated 
lantern. Unbreakable convex lens, 
parabolic reflector, grip-fit handle, rub- 
ber lens collar, micro-focusing. Only 
2 battery terminals to connect — spare 
bulb holder. Burgess Battery Co., 
Freeport, 111. — Radio Today. 



Professional Tru-Tan pick-up 




* Crystal type pick-up employing 
off-set head design which reduces the 
tracking error. Reduces the side 
thrust of the needle on the groove 
wall and practically removes all ten- 
dency to jump grooves. Plays all sizes 
of lateral transcriptions. Finished in 
modernistic black and chrome. Model 
B-16— list $27.50. Astatic Microphone 
Lab., Inc., Youngstown, Ohio — Radio 
Today. 



Webster amplifier 




* 30-watt amplifier with dual ad- 
justable frequency characteristic. In- 
dividual high and low frequency com- 
pensators. 2 input controls permit use 
of 2 low level mikes. Housed in metal 
case with rounded corners. Model 2A- 
30. The Webster Co., 3825 W. Lake 
St., Chicago, 111. — Radio Today — see 
also advt. p. 31. 



26 



Radio Today 




MODEL 



ONLY 
2y2" DIA. 

V2'' THICK 

• 

FULLY 

GUARANTEED 




D-2 



NON- 
DIRECTIONAL 
• 
OUTPUT 
LEVEL 
—60 DO 



-FOR PUBLIC ADDRESS— 1 

THE MODEL D-2, shaped and styled like a watch — immediately 
wins the heart of every microphone user wherever public appear- 
ance is made. Not only beautiful to look at, but does not obstruct 
performer's face. Essentially NON-DIRECTIONAL. Frequency 
response substantially flat from 50 to 6000 c.p.s. Built to stand 
shock far beyond ordinary. Now equipped with plug and socket 
connector for immediate interchange with K-2 or D-104 on same 
stand. Special Astatic cable mounting designed to protect cable 
against breakage. List Price $25. See your jobber or write for 
D-2 Bulletin. 

Licensed itndcr Brush Dei-ehpmcnt Company 
Patents ~ Astatic Patents Pending. 

ASTATIC MICROPHONE LABORATORY, INC. 

DEPT. RT, yOUNGSTOWN, OHIO, U. S. A. 



Ask your jobbei 
fox new booklet, 
"Your Pocket 
Book — What 
About It." 



ROYAL TYPEWRITER 

VI V% V' Vl To National Union 
" *%*!*! Servicemen .... 

Natioual Union and the 
Royal Typewriter Conipany 
have negrotiated a plan to 
provide free type^vriters to 
jVntional Union servicejuen. 
A choice of either the 
Royal D e L u X e Model 
which otherwise would cost 
you $64.50 (shown here) or 
the Royal Model O which 
^vould cost you $54.50 may 
be had with — 

NATIONAL 
UNION 
TUBES 

— purchased over a two-year iiei'iod 
as foUows: 1000 tubes plus $35.00 
dealer deposit secures the Deijuxe 
Model typewriter. . . . Purchase of 850 
tubes, plus $29.00 dealei- deposit gets 
the Model O machine. . . . This is at 
the rate of only 8 to 10 tubes a week, 
purchased over the 2-year period — 
depending on model. . . . Deposit as- 
sures immediate delivery of type- 
writer. . . . Offer good only in V. S. 
Send coupon below for further details. 



National Union Radio Corporation RT-3o7 I -, *- , tt,.;.... 

e.^A X - ^ . ,kT -»- 1 ^-* ■ Katioiial Union 

570 Lexmcrton Ave., Ne«" lorlc City I „ ,„. 

** I offers a complete 

Tell me how to get Royal Typewriter I jjj,g „f radio 




/. 



\ 



and other equipment FREE. 

Name 

Address 



City. 



I 

I 

I 

I 

State I 



tubes in g-lass. 
metal and G - 
types — the out- 
standing favor- 
ites in the radio 
service profes- 
sion. 



HERE'S GOOD NEWS! 




MODEL AP 1831 

15 WATT SYSTEM 

A TYPICAL 

ELECTRO -ACOUSTIC VALUE 



$1345? 



DISTRIBUTORS 

ATTENTION! 

JriERE'S your chance to improve your 
position in the Sound Equipment business, with the 
outstanding line of high quality P. A. Equipment. 
It's a completely new line which will qualify for 
the finest installations without increase in cost. And 
it's complete ! Portable Systems from $59.50 up, 
Amplifiers, Microphones, Accessories and MAGNA- 
VOX P. A. SPEAKERS. All fully licensed. 

Built by people who know how — Elec- 
tro-Acoustic Products Company is a subsidiary of The 
Magnavox Company which has pioneered and built 
the finest sound reproducing apparatus for 26 years. 

A MODERN PLANT IN THE CENTER OF AMERICA 



■ Mi 




A SOURCE OF SUPPLY YOU CAN DEPEND UPON 

IMPORTANT DISTRIBUTORSHIPS ARE OPEN 

DON'T DELAY! WRITE TODAY! 

ELECTRO -ACOUSTIC 

PRODUCTS COMPANY 



Subsidiary oi 

The Magnavox Company 



Fort Wayne 
Indiana 



March, 1937 



27 




IGHTNING-FAST SALE 




Three powerful radios, Htro 6-tube sets snd 
« super 7-tube model, with matching panel 
veraal controls and overhead, separate 
case or in-the-set speakers. Comolete set 

p iic se tLB low AS • • • 




# There's lightning fast sales action in the new Arvin 
Car Radios, simply because they perform so well . . . 
when folks hear 'em play they exclaim, "I never heard 
such a hot performin' car set." 

It's all due to the many Arvin engineering achieve- 
ments headed by the sensational Phantom Filter — a 
"booster station" that steps up power and brings in 
more stations, more clearly. The Automatic Eliminoise, 
Geographical Compensator and Permatune Transform- 



ers are other exclusive features that contribute to the 
brilliant performance of the new Arvins. 

Arvin backs you up with a complete line-up of action- 
getting sales helps, free to registered dealers, and pow- 
erful nation-wide consumer advertising. Ask your job- 
ber about the Arvin Floor Plan Deal. 

NoBLiTT- Sparks Industries, Inc., Columbus, Indiana 

Also makers of Arvin Radios for the home and Arvin Hot Water Car Heaters 



ASK YOUR JOBBER ABOUT THE NEW ARVIN FLQOR PLAN DEAL 



28 



Radio Today 



NEW THINGS 



Ranger-Examiner tube tester 









'S. ^^ ■■ M 



•k Emission type tube checker with 
direct reading good-bad scale. Only 
four simple operations required. 
Checks shorts and leakage — shadow- 
graph AC meter for line adjustments. 
Housed in a metal case with silver 
and black modernistic panel. Model 
440— net ?18. Readrite Meter Works, 
Bluffton, Ohio — Radio Today. 

Exponential speakers 




* Magic Magnet air column speak- 
ers for outdoor use. Quartz ribbon 
voice coil unaffected by moisture or 
temperature variations. Nipermag 
magnets provide high flux in the air 
gap. Spun aluminum horns. Model 
FYA illustrated— list $66.50 complete. 
Will handle 15 watts — 28-inch air col- 
umn — 24-lnch bell. Other models to 
handle 25 and 30 watts. Excellent fre- 
quency response. Cinaudagraph Corp., 
Stamford, Conn. — Radio Today. 

Universal condenser 
replacements 




* 3 additional universal replace- 
ment condensers have been announced 
by Sprague. BT-100 is a rectangular 
unit having 3, 8-mfd. sections at 200 
volts, and 2, 5-mfd. sections at 25 volts. 
ST-1 is same condenser in round card- 



board casing. BT-1 has 5, 10, 25 mfd. 
sections at 150 volts. Numerous com- 
binations can be obtained by parallel- 
ing the sections which have separate 
leads. Sprague Products Corp., North 
Adams, Mass. — Radio Today- — see also 
advt. p. 72. 

Operadio intercommunicator 

* Two-way system of inter-office 
communication. Cased in steel cab- 
inet. Speech may originate at either 
position. Permodynamic speaker used 
as mike and reprodflcer. Separate vol- 
ume control on each unit. Connected 
by No. 18 twisted cable. Type A sys- 
tem — list $75. Type B is a master 
system with maximum of 10 outlying 
stations. Type C Is a multiple unit 
system of 3 to 11 stations — all able to 
communicate with each other. All 
AC-DC operation. Operadio Mfg. Co., 
St. Charles, 111. — Radio Today. — see 
also advt. p. 34. 

Air-tuned I.F. transformers 



Vac-o-grip speaker carriers 




* Line of air-dielectric tuned in- 
termediate transformers. Air type 
condensers provide extreme stability 
and low losses. Available with iron 
or air core windings — Isolantite in- 
sulation. Primary and secondary ad- 
justments at top of shield — size 2 in. 
square by 4% high. List $5 — $6.50. 
J. W. Miller Co., 5917 S. Main St., 
Los Angeles, Calif. — Radio Today. 

Modulation transformers 




* Four multi-match modulation 
transformers for use in amateur trans- 
mitters. Plug-in type connectors per- 
mit rapid matching of modulators to 
amplifier load. Available in 50, 125, 
250, 500 watt ratings. Thordarson 
Electric Mfg. Co., 500 W. Huron St., 
Chicago, 111. — Radio Today. 

* On page 54 of the January Radio 
Today, in the item about Sprague con- 
densers, the condensers were referred 
to as electrolytic, whereas they are 
ordinary paper sections. 




* Vacuum operated carrier for 
mounting speakers on the metal roofs 
of cars without drilling. Single unit 
model illustrated. Vacuum from car 
engine holds frame securely to top of 
car — suction great enough to prevent 
unit from sliding or falling off. P.A. 
carrier No. 4 for single speaker — 
$12.80. Vac-o-grip Co., 2023 Detroit 
Ave., Toledo, Ohio. — Radio Today. 



Taco wavetrap 

* Wavetrap for reducing signals of 
interfering broadcast stations. Avail- 
able in 3 ranges, 450-750, 750-1150, 
1150-1550 KC. Connects between an- 
tenna and set. Housed in small cylin- 
drical case. Sells for less than $1. 
Technical Appliance Corp., 17 B. 16th 
St., New York, N. Y.— Radio Today. 



Weston tube checkers 

modernized 

* Many of the older type Weston 
tube checkers can be rebuilt to accom- 
modate the newer types of tubes. Re- 
builds are offered of the following 
models: 674, 676, 676-R, 677-R, 678-R, 
679-R, 681, 682, Jewell 538-R (letter R 
indicates that it has already been re- 
built once). Test data charts are fur- 
nished with all rebuilds. Weston 
Electrical Instrument Corp., 614 Fre- 
linghuysen Ave., Newark, N. J. — 
Radio Today — see also advt. p. 45. 



Mounting flanges 




* Aerovox PBS card-board cased 
electrolytics are now equipped with a 
universal mounting flange. Fully adjust- 
able so as to hold the unit flat against 
chassis, upright, or stacked by inter- 
locking and soldering the flanges. Slots 
allow for variable spacing of mount- 
ing holes. Units available in 250 and 
450 volt ratings. Aerovox Corp., 70 
Washington St., Brooklyn, N. Y. — 
Radio Today — see also advt. p. 69. 



March, 1937 



29 



NEW THINGS 



Triplett audio oscillator 




* AC operated audio oscillator for 
receiver and amplifier testing. Deliv- 
ers sine wave voltage at following fre- 
quencies— 100, 250, 500, 1000, 2000, 
3000, 4000, 5000, 7500, 10,000 cycles. 
Attenuator for measuring gain percent- 
ages. Housed in metal case. Model 
1260— net $28.33. Triplett Electrical 
Instrument Co., Bluffton, Ohio — Radio 
Today — see also advt. p. 61. 



Wright-deCoster speakers 




■* Speaker designed for remote 
position. Housed in steel cabinet — 
standard 482 5-inch nokoil unit. Model 
596. 

Model 1136 is for use in an auto. 
Uses model 980 nokoil speaker — re- 
quires no field excitation. Cabinet 
mounted by a single stud — fits any 
auto Installation. Wright-deCoster, 
Inc., 2233 University Ave., St. Paul, 
Minn. — Radio Today — see also advt. 
p. 71. 

Lafayette co-ordinated sound 
systems 




* Complete line of sound systems 
■with scientifically matched compo- 
nents. Available In five sizes from 5 
to 60 watts. Mike, amplifier and 
speaker designed to be used with each 
other. "Wholesale Radio Service Co., 
Inc., 100 Sixth Ave., New York, N. Y.— 
Radio Today — see also advt. p. 56. 



Western Electric mike 

* Dynamic microphone that is 
changeable from a non-directive unit 
to a semi-directive unit. Cylindrical 
case with perforated hemispherical 
end. Made directional by adding a 
small baffle to the end. Response well 
balanced from 40-10,000 cycles — output 
level minus 90 DB. Suitable for PA 
and sound reinforcing systems. Type 
633A. Western Electric Co., 195 Broad- 
way, New York, N. Y. — Radio Today — 
see also advt. p. 71. 

Atlas speaker stand 



Electro-Acoustic amplifier 





* Floor stand for speaker. Adjust- 
able height — maximum 8 feet. Ad- 
justable rubber-tipped feet prevent 
wobbling. Shiny fittings — black finish. 
Special saddle for mounting baffle. 
Model AS-10— list $12.50. Atlas Sound 
Corp., 1451 39th St., Brooklyn, N. Y.— 
Radio Today — see also advt. p. 42. 

Meissner dual wavetrap 

* Wave trap for eliminating both 
I.E. and broadcast interference at the 
same time. Consists of 2 units — one 
tuning 400-700 KC for the I.E. fre- 
quency — other tuning 700-1720 KC. 
Iron-core coils provide extremely high 
efficiency. Type 8048— list $2.65. Meiss- 
ner Mfg. Co., Mt. Carmel, 111.— Radio 
Today — see also advt. 70. 

Precision multimeter 




■* Eleven range DC multi-meter. 
DC voltage ranges 0/10/100/250/500/ 
1000 at 1000 ohms per volt. DC mils 
0/1/10/100/25. Ohm scales 0/500/300,- 
000. Ranges selected with switch. 
Leather finished case 4% x 7 x 214 
inches. Model 830 — net $10.95. Pre- 
cision Apparatus Co., 121 E. New York 
Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. — Radio Today. 

ATR vibrators 

•k Complete line replacement vibra- 
tors for auto and farm radios featur- 
ing improved performance, precision 
construction, and lower prices. Vibra- 
tor guide sent free to servicemen. 
American Television & Radio Co., 128 
E. 10th St., St. Paul, Minn.— Radio 
Today. 




* 30 watt beam power amplifier 
with provision for mixing 3 crystal or 
3 velocity mikes and high-impedance 
pick-up. 5 controls for mixing, fading 
and tone. Amplifier supplies field for 
2 13,000 ohm speakers or 1 5000 ohm. 
Eield circuit separate from filter. 
Model A-3023— list $87.50. Electro- 
Acoustic Products Co. (subsidiary of 
Magnavox), Fort Wayne, Ind. — Radio 
Today — see also advt. p. 27. 

Crystal musical pick-up 




* Vibration type pick-up for use 
with musical Instruments. Type VP- 
1-M has a frequency range up to 8000 
cycles. Size is only i/4 x % x 1% 
inches. May be cemented in place or 
clamped. List $17.50. Brush De- 
velopment Co., E. 40th & Perkins, 
Cleveland, Ohio — Radio Today* — see also 
advt. p. 46. 

Bullet mike in colors 

* Chinese red and antique ivory 
finishes are now available for the Bul- 
let dynamic microphones. Standard 
black is still available. Colors are 
ideal for such installations as night 
clubs. Model TR-3 in colors — list 
$27.00. Transducer Corp., 30 Rocke- 
feller Plaza, New York, N. Y. — Radio 
Today — see also advt. p. 70. 

Multi-tester 




* Low-cost multiple range meter. 
2000 ohms per volt movement — 0/ 
5/50/500/1000 volts DC; 0/.5/5/50/500/ 
5M mils; 0/500/50M/lmeg resistance. 
Ranges available at pin-tip jacks. 
Model 408— net $9.95. With rectifier 
for AC voltages— $13.90. Size 3x5 %x2 
inches with 2% inch meter. Radio 
City Products Co.. 88 Park Place, New 
York, N. Y. — Radio Today. 



30 



Radio Today 



MAKE 
MORE 
MONEY 

. . . Selling 

WEBSTER. 
CHICAGO 

The Fastest-Moving 
Line of 

SOUND EQUIPMENT 

All radio dealers and service dealers should in- 
vestigate the money making possibilities of 
the Webster-Chicago line of sound equipment, 
public address systems and accessories. 




SOME OF WEBSTER-CHICAGO'S 
DEALER HELPS 

4. Factory Call System 
Broadside. 

5. Dealer Signs with 
Individual Dealer 
Name. 

. . . Part of a definiite 
plan of cooperation 
vsdth you to sell sound. 



I.Sound Engineering 
Book Useful En- 
gineering Sales Help. 

3. School and Institu- 
tional Mailing Piece. 

3. Inter-Office Commu- 
nication System 
Folder. 



Model PA -530 MOBILE 
SYSTEM. For 6 Volt DC 
or 110 Volt AC operation. . . 
Hand type crystal micro- 
phone, 2 P.M. speakers, pho- 
nograph turntable built into 
amplifier. A 30-watt ALL 
PURPOSE SYSTEM. 




Model OCM INTER-OFFICE 
COMMUNICATION SYSTEM 



Model PA-20A PORTABLE 
SYSTEM. A 20-watt Port- 
able System, packed in 2 
handy cases. . . 2 P.M. 
speakers, crystal microphone 
with full length floor stand, 
dual input electronic mixer, 
amplifier uses latest type 
beam tubes. 




• A complete Sound line. . . . All items. 

• Designed by Specialists with many years experience 

in Sound Engineering. . . . All the very latest fea- 
tures Many exclusive WEBSTER-CHICAGO 

developments. 

• Priced to sell in volume. 

• Extensive and sustained advertising to the Consumer 

— vv^ith inquiries forwarded to dealers. 

• Dealer helps that definitely open doors. 

Such outstanding merchandise backed by such intensive 
selling efforts creates turnover . . . the backbone of dealer 
profit. 

WEBSTER - CHICAGO 



Strict Dealer Policy 



Fully Licensed 



NOTICE to DEALERS: '"" T^n" cou^n **"" 

WEBSTER-CHICAGO, SecUon M-9, 3825 W. Lake St., Chicago, HI. 

Without obligation please send 
me more information on checked 
items. 



nlnter-OflSce 
Systems 

— 1 Mobile 
— I Systems 

I Portables 

I Fixed 
— I Systems 



I I Sebool 
■ — Systems 

FaetoryCall 
1 — ' Systems 



scry Items 



) Dealer 
i — Helps 



Name . . . 
-Address. 
Citv 



.State. 



I 1 



March, 1937 



31 



TELL-ALL ON INTERCOMMUNICATORS 



Model 
No. 



List List for Type 

for 2 additional of 

stations stations system 



No. of Trans, 
remote line 

stations required 



Type 
power 
supply 



Maxi- 
Pick-up mum 
No. of at how distance 
tubes many between 



Allied Radio Corp., 833 W. Jackson Blvd., Chicago, 111.— "Knight" 

A12080 $45.00 $17.50 Yes 110 AC-DC 

A12083 75.00 17.50 Master 4 Yes HO AC-DC 

A120S5 130.00 47.50 Multiple 4 Yes 110 AC-DC 



feet 

10 
10 
10 



Volume 
control 



Momentary 

talk 

switch 



David Bogen Co., Inc., 663 Broadway, New York, N. Y. — "Bogen Communo-Phone" 

2SC 49 50 Yes 110 AC-DC 2 2 

5SC 105^00 52.50 Multiple Unlimited Yes 110 AC-DC 4 10 

American Carrier Call Corp., 119 W. 57th St., New York, N. Y.— "Carrier Call" 

$65.00 No 110 AC-DC 4 NS 

Dictograph Products, Co., Inc., 580 Fifth Ave., New York, N. Y. — "Dictograph" 

$ 65. 00 and up All types Unlimited Yes Battery None 4 

Electronic Devices, Inc., 626 Broadway, Cincinnati, Ohio — "Portaphone" 

FL $65.00 $32.50 No (110-220 1 3 

NS NS NS Master 6 No \AC-DC / NS 

Electronic Sound Labs., Inc., 5912 Melrose Ave.. Hollywood, Calif. — "E. S. L." 
M50 $49.50 $15.00 Master Unlimited Yes fllO AC 1 3 

\110 AC-DC 1 

Laurehk Radio Mfg. Co., E. Michigan St., Adrian, Mich. — "Laurehk" 

IC-42 $32.75 $10.00 Master 4 Yes HO AC-DC NS 

Miles Reproducer Co., Inc., 114 W. 14th St., New York, N. Y. — "Vocaphone" 

201 $69.50 $20.00 Master Unlimited Yes 110 AC-DC 4 

601 79.50 20.00 Master Unhmited Yes 110 AC- DC 4 



20 
20 



Operadio Mfg. Co., St. Charles, 111.— "Opcradlo" 

A $ 57. 50 

B NS NS Master 10 

C NS NS Multiple 10 

Ottawa Radio Co., 308 W. Lafayette St., Ottawa, 111.- 
CR-10 $ 55. 00 $ 27. 50 Master 7 



Yes 
Yes 
Yes 



110 AC-DC 
110 AC-DC 
110 AC-DC 



40 
40 

50 
50 
50 



-"Ottawa" 
Yes 110 AC-DC 



Phllco Radio & Television Corp., Tioga & C Sts., Philadelphia, Pa. — "Philcophone" 

901,902 $ 49. 50 $ 10. 00 Master 4 Yes 110 AC-DC 4 40 

Radolek Co., 601 W. Randolph St.. Chicago, 111.— "Radolek" 

$ 35. 00 $ 8. 00 Master 6 Yes 110 AC-DC 3 3 

Remler Co., Ltd., 2101 Bryant St., San Francisco, Calit — "Remler" 

CIO $47,00 Yes 110 AC 3 25-75 

M50 52.00 $16.50 Master 12 Yes 110 AC 3 25-75 

M70 86.00 $45.50 Multiple 12 Yes 110 AC 3 25-75 

Sound Systems, Inc., 6545 Carnegie Ave., Cleveland, Ohio — "S. S. I." 

CY50-51 1 $35.00 ($ 10.00 Master 1 17 Yes 110 AC-DC ' 3 3 

52-53-54 / t 12.50 Multiple / 

Transphone Corp. of America, 14 W. 45th St., New York, N. Y. — "Transphone" 

D $ 65.00 Master 10 No 110 AC-DC NS NS 



Transducer Corp., 

C2 NS 

C3, C4 NS 

S3, S4 NS 

T3, T4 NS 



30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N. Y.— 
NS Master 3 Yes 

NS Master 3 Yes 

NS Multiple 3 Yes 

NS Master 3 Yes 



Also available in 6 and 32 volt DC types. 

Turner Co., Cedar Rapids, Iowa — "Speech Relay" "PDQ" 

$125.00 $ 30.00 Yes 

140.00 30.00 Master 9 Yes 

170.00 35.00 Multiple 9 Yes 

PDQ 64.50 12.00 Yes 

United Scientific Labs., 510 Sixth Ave., New York, N. Y.— ' 
200 $48.00 Yes 

202 48.00 $ 24.00 Master 6 Yes 



"BuUetphone" 

110 AC-DC 
no AC-DC 
110 AC-DC 
110 AC-DC 



NS 10 

NS 10 

NS 10 

NS 10 



110 AC-DC NS 

110 AC-DC NS 

110 AC-DC NS 

110 AC NS 

Electrocal" 

110 AC-DC 2 

110 AC-DC 2 



40 
40 
40 
40 



units 

1500 

1500 Master 

1500 All stations 



500 
1000 



2500 
2500 



Yes 
Yes 



3000 Internal 



500 
2000 

1000 
1000 
1000 



Yes 
Yes 

Yes 
Yes 
Yes 



1000 Master 



250 Optional 



1000 
1000 
1000 



Master 
Master 
AH stations 



1000 Master 



Unlimited No 

Unlimited No 

Unlimited No 

Unlimited No 



2000 
2000 
2000 
2000 

1000 
1000 



United Sound Equipment Co., 2233 University Ave., St. Paul, Minn. — not available as we go to press. 

Webster Co., 3825 W. Lake St.. Chicago, 111.- 

OC2 $ 73 50 

OCM 73! 50 $ 45.00 Master 10 



' 'Webster-Chicago" 

Yes 110 AC-DC 
Yes 110 AC-DC 



500 
500 



Yes 
Yes 
Yes 



Yes 
Yes 



Yes 
Yes 



Webster Electric Co., De Koven & Clark, Racine, Wis — "Teletalk" 

$51.00 Yes 110 AC-DC 3 

NS $13.50 & 21.00 Master 9 Yes 110 AC-DC 3 

NS NS Multiple 9 Yes 110 AC-DC 3 



4 2000 Master 

4 2000 Master 

4 2000 All stations 



Yes 
Yes 
Yes 

Yes 
Yes 



No 
No 



Yes 

Yes 

Yes 
Yes 
Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

Yes 
Yes 
Yes 



Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 



Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 

Yes 
Yes 



Yes 
Yes 

Yes 
Yes 
Yes 



Size of 

master 

unit 



7Kx7J^x5K 
10x81^x6% 

8x8x4 
7^^x8x7 

9x6^x5 Ji 



6x7x9 ^ 

NS 



8x8x8 
8x8x8 

9x5x7M 
9x5x7 H 
9x5x734 

8x14x7 

NS 

12x6x7 

10x65-^x5 
10x65^x5 
10x6^x5 



Size of 

remote 

unit 



7Kx73.gx5)i 
75ix73ix5K 
10x81^x6 Ji 

8x8x4 
7^x8x7 

9x6J^x59-i 



6x7x9 H 
NS 



NS 

8x8x8 
8x8x8 

9x5x71^ 
9x5x7 H 
9x5x7H 

8x14x7 

NS 

6x6x5 

10x6?^x5 
10x65^x5 
10x63^x5 



ll>^x6Hx7M llJ-<x6)^x7H 



NS 

NS 

NS 

7i4x7J^x4 

8x5x6 
8x5x6 



6x7Mx9 
6x7Mx9 

11^x6x7}^ 
llKx6x7H 
llKx6x7M 



NS 

NS 

NS 

7Mx7Jix4 

8x5x6 
8x5x6 



6x75^x9 
6x7 Mx9 

111^x6x7 J^ 
llHx6x7H 
llKx6x7K 



* Listed above are specifications 
of some 40 intercommunications sys- 
tems manufactured by half as many 
companies. Basic price is given for 
two stations and does not include 
installation fees or transmission line. 

Intercommunicators can be divided 
into three distinct types : non-selective 
units of which the simple two station- 
installation is typical. With the non- 
selective types it is sometimes possi- 
ble to have as many as six or more 
operating on a common system, but 
speech is heard at all stations when 
anyone is talking over the system. 

The master type of system has a 



master unit, which is capable of se- 
lecting any desired remote station. In 
this way it is possible to carry on a 
conversation with any remote station 
without the other staions hearing any- 
thing. 

Third system is the use of a num- 
ber of master units — this has been 
labeled multiple because of the use 
of several master systems. In the 
multiple installation it is possible for 
any station to talk with any other 
station directly and privately. Also 
the operation of any pair of stations 
has no effect on the other stations 
so that they may also be used simul- 



taneously for separate communica- 
tion. In other words, if there were 
six stations, it would be possible for 
three pairs of units to be operating 
at once without interfering with each 
other. 

A listing appears above which gives 
a comparative idea of the sensitivity 
of the various units — it has the head- 
ing pich-up at how many feet and 
figures are given for normal talking 
voice. Many systems with low sen- 
sitivity have been made purposely so 
— and if required can usually be made 
more sensitive. 



32 



Radio Today 



C^'^he SYSTEM that MADE 




ORIGINATORS 
jjil^^^- of the INSTANT 2-WAY 
[ti^^'*' COMMUNICATING SYSTEM 

Plug into any electric light socket, 
press the signal, talk... and listen. 



• WIRE-LESS ... NO WIRES ... NO BATTERIES 
... NO INSTALLATION COSTS. Nothing extra 
to sell. You sell what you advertise . . . packaged 
merchandise . . . ready to plug in. 

• PORTABLE . . . MOVE IT ANYWHERE AT WILL! 
Move from room to room . . . from floor to floor 
. . . from building to building . . . just pick it up 
and take it with you . . . you plug it in just like a 
lamp. 



• OPERATES 



On AC or DC current. 



• EXCLUSIVE . . . Opens tremendous market where 
other types of equipment cannot be used . . . 
giving CARRIER-CALL an exclusive and powerful 
selling advantage. 

• LICENSED . . . CARRIER-CALL is licensed 
by Electrical Research Products, Inc., under 
patents owned or controlled by American Tele- 
phone and Telegraph Co. and Western Electric 
Company, Inc. This is DOUBLE PROTECTION 
for you. 

• MARKETING ADVANTAGES . . . CARRIER-CALL 

gives the distributors and dealers the best and 
surest opportunity for the profitable sale of com- 
munication systems, from every merchandising 
and technical standpoint. 

• CARRIER-CALL has created this phenomenal new 
market because it has none of the limitations of 
the older types. 



* FAMOUS SCIENTISTS SEE CARRIER-CALL IN ACTION. 

On October 5th, 1936, CARRIER-CALL was 
presented to an audience of distinguished 
scientists at the NEW YORK MUSEUM OF 
SCIENCE AND INDUSTRY . . . where it was 
subjected to the most exacting analyses and 
tests and overnight became the sensation of 
the scientific world . . . creating a new in- 
dustry . . . bringing in orders and inquiries 
from every corner of the earth. 

MHE CARRIER-CALL DISTRIBUTER FRANCHISE 

presents : 

NEW MARKETS 

ATTRACTIVE PROFIT MARGINS 
EXCLUSIVE TERRITORIES 
PRODUCT LEADERSHIP 
COOPERATIVE ADVERTISING 

'DISTRIBUTORS... DEALERS! 

Here's an unusual merchandising proposi- 
tion. A "Packaged" over-the-counter item 
that sells itself on demonstration. Everybody 
is a prospect . . . Offices, Plants, Factories, 
Banks, Hotels, Restaurants, Schools, Col- 
leges, Theatres, Hospitals, Churches, Clubs, 
Halls, Auditoriums, Stores, Shops, Parks, 
PRIVATE HOMES, Doctors, Dentists . . . 
wherever people talk and listen. 



SOME VERY ATTRACTIVE TERRITORIES STILL ARE AVAILABLE TO ACCEPTABLE DISTRIBUTORS AND DEALERS... 
WIRE OR WRITE TODAY — YOUR QUALIFICATIONS, TERRITORY YOU COVER, AND YOUR SALES FACILITIES 

...WE WILL CONTACT YOU PROMPTLY. 



AMERICAN CARRIER-CALL CORPORATION 
119 West 57th Street • • New York, N. Y 



March, 1937 



33 




fo Champion Jobber^ 
nd IbaVr^ PROFITS 



. . . has always been the poUcy from which we 
have never deviated. We offer not only a substan- 
tial profit to jobbers and dealers, but so conduct 
our business that you actuallymaice those profits. 

OPERADIO does not enter into competition 
with jobbers and dealers by selling direct to the 
consumer. Neither do we countenance, directly 
or indirectly, the practice of competing unfairly 
with our established outlets by selling everyone 
and anyone who can purchase our equipment 
and pay for it. 

To maintain a policy which allows for protected 
profit taking ... to pass by the business of those 
who operate against our established jobber-dealer 
setup ... to refuse the business of the "price 
chiseler" . . . those are the principles to which we 
subscribe. 



Mr. Jobber and Mr. Dealer ... we submit that 
when you sell OPERADIO Sound and Public 
Address Equipment you make more money be- 
cause you are dealing with a company who does 
not sell all comers at your expense. 



fVant to keep abreast 
of Sound? 

TlKti ask to be put on 
our list to receive "THE 
SOUND ADVISOR" 
— a monthly publication 
sent with our compli- 
?nents. Address Depl. 
R. T. 3. 



-k A NEW LINE? ... Operadio does not obsolete job- 
bers' and dealers' stocks by bringing out a new line periodically. 
To be sure, progress demands that we give you the benefit of 
new developments as they are proved practical and saleable. 
Such new developments will be announced shortly. 



BRNOIO 



MANUFACTURING COMPANY ST.CHARLES ILLINOIS 



A NAME LONG KNOWN FOR FAIR DEALING AND QUALITY IN SOUND AND PUBLIC ADDRESS EQUIPMENT 



34 



Radio Today 



DECIBEL RATIOS & POWER LEVELS 



DECIBEL GAIN OR LOSS VS. VOLTAGE RATIO 



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.00005 .00001 .00001 




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FOR DECIBEL GAIN READ TOP SCALES FOR VOLTAGE RATIO 
FOR DECIBEL LOSS READ BOTTOM SCALES FOR VOLTAGE RATIO 



DECIBEL LEVEL VS. POWER LEVEL 



006 .01 .06 .1 6 


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MICROWATTS 

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60 60 100 



600 1000 6000 



6000 1000 600 100 



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60 60 10 



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FOR PLUS DECIBEL LEVEL READ TOP SCALES FOR WATTS RADIO 

FOR MINUS DECIBEL LEVEL READ BOTTOM SCALES FOR MICROWATTS TODAY 

DB. = 6.00 MILLIWATTS 



SERVICING AND MAINTAINING SOUND EQUIPMENT 

Practical hints for the man with radio-service experience 



* A HIGH-GAIN amplifier, con- 
trary to general opinion, is quite dif- 
ferent from ordinary radio set audio 
amplifiers. The tolerance on the va- 
rious parts and frequency character- 
istic are more rigid than in a receiver 
— higher gains and operation at ex- 
tremely low levels introduce many 
problems not found in a radio set. 
Many PA amplifiers have more gain 
than an entire radio, including EF 
and IF circuits. 

When called into service any sound 
installation the first thing to deter- 
mine is whether or not the system 
ever worked properly. If it did, and 
no changes have been made either 
in the installation or the structure of 
the building, the serviceman should 
confine his efforts to locating some de- 
fect in the equipment instead of rec- 
ommending changes or additional 
equipment, advises Art Schneider, 
N. Y. superviser of EGA Centralized 
Sound and Photophone service. Also, 
he should obtain the service bulletins 
for the particular system employed — 
this is particularly important in view 
of the fact that slight variations in 
operating voltages and parts values 
will affect the operation quite serious- 
ly. In other words, the serviceman 
cannot just assume that a certain 
value is approximately correct. 

Closer tolerances 

The closer tolerances required in 
sound systems are not in any way an 
indication that troubles are more like- 
ly to occur — in fact just the opposite 
is true with quality amplifiers since 
they are built more carefully and with 
more precise parts. 

Difiiculties with amplifier systems 
can be classified for discussion into 
four distinct groups : inoperation, in- 
adequate volume, distortion, poor 
quality or frequency-response. 

Inoperation, of course, means the 
failure of some part or parts. In in- 
stallations using flexible cords for mi- 
crophones, the input system is most 
prone to trouble — breaks frequently 
occur in the cables. The first test in 
such a set-up should be made in the 
input system — this is readily done by 
connecting a microphone directly to 
the input of the amplifier. 

If the difficulty is not shown up 
by this test, it is best to work from 
the loudspeaker backwards. First 
test should be to see that the speaker 



is getting field excitation and that the 
voice coil is not open. Voice coils 
can be easily checked using a s.mall 
battery and noticing the movement of 
the cone when the voltage is applied. 

The high-level amplifier stages can 
be rapidly checked by removing and 
replacing the tube — a plop indicates 
that the tube is functioning. On the 
lower level stages a hum or some noise 
should result when a finger is placed 
on the grids. These tests, which 
should be familiar to radio service- 
men, will give a quick check and rap- 
idly locate the defective stage. If the 
amplifier and speaker are okay, the 
only other sources of trouble are the 
pre-amplifier and the mike itself, 
since in the preliminary test a check 
was made of the input wiring sys- 
tem. We have assumed, of course, 
that the serviceman has kept his eyes 
open for such obvious things as smok- 
ing transformers or burnt-out tubes 
and improper voltages. 

Mikes frequently are mistreated 
and as a result become inoperative. 
The best check for a mike is to sub- 
stitute one that is known to be good — 
or test it with an amplifier that is 
working okay. Bibboii or velocity 
milxes should never he tested with an 
ohmmeter — the application of a volt- 




This non-directional Western Electric 

mike can be made semi-directional by 

the addition of a small baffle plate. 



age to the ribbon will cause the rib- 
bon to be pushed out of the pole- 
pieces with such a force that it will 
break. 

Mike cables are most easily checked 
by shorting the amplifier input end 
and opening the mike end — an ohm- 
meter applied to the mike end of the 
cable will provide a continuity check. 
The cable should be whipped around 
during this test to show up any in- 
termittents. Also a check for short- 
ing to the shield should be made. 

The serviceman should never at- 
tempt to repair a quality mike for he 
has n« instruments with which to tell 
if his repairs have been properly 
made. If the mike doesn't work prop- 
erly it should be returned to the fac- 
tory or local agent, advises RCA 
sound expert Schneider. 

Inadequate volume 

Inadequate volume is something 
that many servicemen are likely to 
blame upon the original installation — 
in fact many times additional ampli- 
fiers and many changes have been rec- 
ommended. If the amplifier worked 
well once, it should be apparent that 
something in the set-up has gone bad 
— and the serviceman should use his 
head and locate a defect. 

Tubes are one of the common 
sources of trouble — and usually they 
deteriorate gTadually, making it nec- 
essary to increase the setting of the 
gain control. In the low-level high- 
gain stages the tubes are most criti- 
cal. In fact, the ordinary tu.be test- 
ers are not satisfactory for checking 
the tubes, reports a large iSTew York 
sound maintenance organization. 
Suspected tubes should be replaced 
with new ones. The high-gain tubes 
should be checked at intervals of 
about 1,500 hours use. Output tubes 
seem to operate about twice as long 
as the voltage amplifier ones. If the 
plate current becomes excessive they 
should be replaced even if the quality 
seems okay. 

Resistors within 5% 

Low volume may be caused by 
shorted voice coil turns or shorted 
output transformer. Changes in re- 
sistors will affect the gain consider- 
ably — in many amplifiers the resistors 
are held to within 2'^c but more often 
5%. The accumulation of dust, mois- 
ture, etc., often will require replace- 
(To page 40) 



36 



Radio Today 



when they pay a 

Bonus for Quality 

it must he 



^sS-- = 









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^f^ '^r? *=>(,; •V^ °J' . -Sia^'^o ■^'^i- 



N, 




• Read this letter. It tells a story 

of quality in no uncertain terms. It 

tells the story of Webster Electric quality 

— a standard of quality for which the buyer 

willing to pay a bonus. 

The market for Webster Electric quality sound equipment 
is unlimited. It is limited only by the activities of the organ- 
izations who aggressively go after the business that is waiting. 

When you sell Webster Electric Sound Equipment you are 
selling the highest quality line available. This fine line is backed 
by a merchandising set-up that is bound to develop volume 
business. 

The Webster Electric line is complete. It incorporates 
pKDrtable and semi-portable systems from 5 watts output 
up to 50-50 watts. The Webster Electric line also includes 
Teletalk, the new method of inter-communication. There is a 




Teletalk 
System to meet 
every commercial 

and industrial requirement. 

Investigate the possibilities of the Webster Electric line. 
Complete bulletins and sales helps will be supplied on request. 
There is a large volume waiting those who go after it. 

The Webster Electric Class "A" Sound System 

This is the model referred to in the above letter. It is the 
Webster Electric Class "A" 30 Watt Semi-Portable Sound 
System. It comes to you complete in every detail. It will 
handle two crystal microphones and two 12" dynamic speakers. 

Webster Electric Sound Systems are licensed by agree- 
ment with Electrical Research Products, Inc., under 
patents owned by Western Electric Company, Inc. 
and American Telephone and Telegraph Company 

WEBSTER ELECTRIC COMPANY 

RACINE, WISCONSIN. U. S. A- 
Established 1909 



WEBSTER ELECTRIC 



SOUND EQUIPMENT 



.../\L/JL/ 




RADIO CORPORATION OF A 

Everything in radio for service in cotW 



m^ 



THE WAY! 



"RCA ALL THE WAY" is more than a slogan. It's a statement of 
fact that means much ... to the radio consumer's satisfaction and 
pleasure ... to the dealer's sales and profits. That RCA makes every- 
thing in radio from the microphone in the studio to the loudspeaker 
in the home is important. Only RCA is actively engaged in every 
phase of radio. When you buy or sell an RCA product, you can be 
sure it is soundly engineered by men skilled in all fields of radio . . . 
men who have given the benefits of their wide knowledge of every 
division of the industry to each individual RCA product they design. 



RCA IS ACTIVE IN EVERY PHASi OF RADIO 



RCA Communications, Inc. . . . Swift 
radiotelegraph service between 11 
American cities and 45 foreign coun- 
tries — plus rapid transfer service to all 
world points. 

Radiomarine Corp. of America . . . 
Ship-to-ship and ship-to-shore radio 
communication. 

National Broadcasting Co., Inc. . . . Coast- 
to-coast radio broadcasting service on 
Red and Blue networks. 



R CA Institutes, Inc. . . .Technical radio 
educational service, classroom and cor- 
respondence courses. 

RCA Manufacturing Co., Inc. . . . Makers 
of everything in radio, from micro- 
phone in studio to loudspeaker in 
home. It is this complete experience 
that attaches a quality meaning to the 
slogan : 

RCA ALL THE WAYI 



RCA MANUFACTURING CO., INC. RCA INSTITUTES, INC. 

RCA COMMUNICATIONS, INC. RADIOMARINE CORP. OF AMERICA 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING CO., INC. 

Listen to "The Magic Key" every Sunday, 2 to ^ P. M., E. S. T. on NBC Blue Network 



ERICA • Radio City • NEW YORK 

tiiications . . . broadcasting , . . reception 



...ALLITHE WAY! 




"RCA ALL THE WAY" is more than a slogan. It's a statement of 
fact that means much... to the radio consumer's satisfaction and 
pleasure ... to the dealer's sales and profits. That RCA makes every- 
thing in radio from the microphone in the studio to the loudspeaker 
in the home is important. Only RCA is actively engaged in every 
phase of radio. When you buy or sell an RCA product, you can be 
sure it is soundly engineered by men skilled in all fields of radio . . . 
men who have given the benefits of their wide knowledge of every 
division of the industry to each individual RCA product they design. 



RCA IS ACTIVE IN EVERY PHASf OF RADIO 



KCA Communications, Inc. . . . Swift 
radiotelegraph service between 11 
American cities and 45 foreign coun- 
tries plus rapid transfer service to all 

world points. 

Radiomarine Corp. of America . . . 
Ship-to-ship and ship-to-shore radio 
communication. 

National Broadcasting Co., Inc. . . . Coast- 
to-coast radio broadcasting service on 
Red and Blue networks. 



RCA Institutes, Inc. . . .Technical radio 
educational service, classroom and cor- 
respondence courses. 
RCA ManufacturingCo.,Inc....U!ikeis 
of everything in radio, from micro- 
phon* in studio to loudspeaker in 
home. It is this complete experience 
that attaches a quality meaning to the 
slogan: 

RCA ALL THE WAY! 



RCA MANUFACTURING CO., INC. KCA «N«T"^T^^ J^ 

RCA COMMUNICATIONS. INC. RADIOMARINE CORP. OF AMERICA 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING CO.. INC. 

c J , ^t^-, p M F ST on NBC Blue Network 
Listen to "The Magic Kef every Sunday, 2 to 3 P.M., t.i.i- 



RADIO CORPORATION OF AMERICA • /?«^o City • NEW YORK 

Everything in radio for service in cofflHunications . . . broadcasting . . . reception 




SERVICING SOUND 



NEW 

Key to volnme and profits 
in a tremendous market 



CMc^ur^^ 



3-way and multiple 
communication system 



MODERN— SPEEDY— EFFICIENT 



EASY to install and easy to operate. 
Direct communication between 2 
points, with model No. 200 and 
between master station and two to six 
outlying stations with model No. 202. 

SELLS TO 

Factories Hotels 

Restaurants Offices 

Sliipping Depts. 

Schools Libraries 

Public Buildings 

wherever inter - depart- 
mental or instant conver- 
sation is required 

This revolutionary new device simply 
plugs in, and gives perfect amplified 
sound by merely pressing down on the 
"talk-listen" key! 

Merchants all over the country have 
sensed the universal value of ELEC- 
TROCALL and are making a clean-up 
by selling it to their patrons in a 
hundred lines of business. 

No installation or service headaches. 
No competition with other so-called 
intramural communication systems. AC 
or DC current, consumption negligible. 
Speeds up office efficiency, keeps 
phone lines open for incoming calls. 

A beaatifnl MERCHANDISING weapon 

for the modem electrical wholesaler! 

IFrire joT da the facts 

UNITED SCIENTIFIC LABS., Inc. 
62 West 14th Street New York City 




{From page 36) 
ment of the unit. Coupling con- 
densers in the resistance coupled 
stages will affect the gain tremen- 
dously as well as the quality. 

In some amplifiers it is common 
practice to group the cathode by-pass 
condensers in a can with a single 
ground lead. Should this lead become 
broken or the connection be bad, the 
removal of all the by-pass condensers 
will render the amplifier highly de- 
generative, greatly reducing its gain. 

Cleaning up the socket contacts 
and brushing out the dust has been 
known to give increases in gain as 
great as 6DB. 

Insufficient field voltage 

Changing of speakers and mis- 
matching often affects the gain and 
undistorted power output. Insufficient 
field current or voltag'e will lower the 
speaker efficiency tremendously re- 
sulting in a lower output. Ordinarily 
as much as a 10% increase in field 
voltage will have no ill effects al- 
though the field heat dissipation is in- 
creased about 20%. But a similar 
decrease in it cannot be tolerated in 
most systems, since the speakers are 
operated at. as low an excitation as is 
possible for satisfactory operation. 

Moisture in microphone cables or 
the input wiring systems in some in- 
stances has decreased available in- 
put voltage to such a degree that nor- 
mal output could not be obtained. 
This condition can be determined 
with a megger or megohmmeter — or 
substitution. 

Distortion may be caused by any of 
the troubles commonly found in re- 
ceivers. Tubes are often at fault. 
When push-pull tubes are used, par- 
ticularly class B, the plate currents 
should be equal both at zero and max- 
imum output levels. Mismatching of 
speakers, shorted turns, and field ex- 
citation may be the cause of distor- 
tion. 

Very often the distortion is caused 
by overloading of the amplifier, in 
either the output or low-level stages — 
reducing the input is the obvious 
cure. And if the gain is then insuf- 
ficient, find out where the loss of gain 
is occurring. 

Frequency characteristics 

The quality of reproduction is gov- 
erned by many factors that should be 
recognized. For instance, at low levels 
the human ear is not as responsive 
to low frequencies. Such a fault is 



not caused by the amplifier — but still 
it must be corrected. The pui^pose of 
a sound installation is to amplify 
the original sound intensities — and 
to the ear they must still sound the 
same as before amplification. 

WLen a mike is used for speech at 
close quarters (up to two feet) the 
amplifier frequency characteristic 
must be altered so as to reduce the 
low frequencies — otherwise the output 
will be boomy. Yet if a long distance 
pick-up is used the low frequency re- 
spouse of the amplifier must be in- 
creased or the output will sound 
tinny. And the only change was in 
the distance between the sound source 
and the mike. 

High frequency response is often 
reduced when long lines are used with 
very high impedance microphones. 
Placing curtains over the speakers 
will also decrease the high-frequency 
response. 

If it is desired to alter the fre- 
quency response of the amplifier for 
various types of pick-up, the tone con- 
trols will usually do the trick. Any 
changes in the amplifier itself should 
be made in accordance with the manu- 
facturer's instructions. 

Changes in coupling resistances and 
capacitors have a marked effect on the 
response characteristics — both at high 
and low frequencies. When it is sus- 
pected that they may be the cause, 
their values should be checked with 
the manufacturer's service bulletins. 
And it should be remembered that the 
tolerances are much closer than is 
found in receivers. 

For test equipment the servicemen 
should have an audio frequency oscil- 
lator that will give harmonic-free sig- 
nals over the entire audio band. 
High-resistance voltmeters are essen- 
tial for measurements in the resist- 
ance coupled circuits. And a meter 
calibrated in DB is useful for check- 
ing the output and the results of va- 
rious changes. For checking distor- 
tion and the operation of the various 
stages, a cathode-ray oscillograph 
with a sweep is very useful. 

HIGH-FIDELITY REPRODUCTION 

* With the present high-fidelity 
trend, service and sound men should 
realize that a high-fidelity speaker is 
only part of the requirement for a 
high-fidelity system. Other things 
must be taken into consideration — 
particularly the harmonic content of 
the amplifier. 

Quoting Wright-DeCoster's presi- 



40 



Radio Today 



VEHTORY! 



po 



WJB 



TllJ» 



KSf" 



.4<'?,t 






■SH'' 



Etc 









.aci 



*»•' 



D«'' 



p^ 



IJ» 



i-^l 



^ 



>^' 



V 



Stancor makes it possible to throw the "want 
book" in the discard. There need be no more 
shortage in your transformer stock. . . and no 
troublesome inventory routine to keep track of 
what is on the shelves. 

The new Stancor label does the trick. Use it 
as a stock check and you'll never need to say, 
"Sorry, but we're just out." 

STAN DARD 
TRANSFORMER 
CORPORATION 

850 BLACKHAWK ST. • CHICAGO, ILL. 
March, 1937 





41 



SUCCESSFUL 

PERFQRmRnCE 



unoER 
SEVERE conDiTions 



XtVOCITY 



ACHIEVES 
UNIQUE RECORD 
IN ACTUAL USE 

II 
SUCCESSFUL 

in performance: "A 

magniiicenl instrument 
. . . Despite the climate 
here, results are mar- 
veloiis and could not 
he bettered. I am sure". 
D. Hopkins, Raffles 
Hotel, Singapore. 

SUCCESSFUL 

in design: "Your 

streamhne mike is go- 
ing over big with our 
trade. Congratulations 
on its fine design and 
performance',' 
R. Ruben, Saugus, 
Mass. 

SUCCESSFUL 

in construction: "We 

believe no other mike 
could take the punish- 
ment i( has ond stilt 
give such excellent re- 
production", Johnston. 
P.A. Service, Oneonta, 
N.Y. 

SUCCESSFUL^ 

in sales: 'The finest 
type microphone that I 
ever used . . Please 
duplicate my order", 
Ridley's P.A. Systems, 

FEATURES: '"=■■ ^ui^-. ouo. 

1. Output increased 6 DB. 

2. Triple shielded — entirely eliminat- 
ing hum pickup. 

3. Eliminates ieedback troubles. 

4. Excellent for close talking and dis- 
tcftit pickup. 

5. Acoustically designed to elimi- 
nate any possibility of cavity reso- 
nance. 

6. Fitted with switch and cable clamp. 

NEWS! 

MODELS HBHn (High Impedance): RBMn (200 ohms), 
with Cable Connedoi ond Switch. $42.00 LIST 
NEV/! Models RBSn, RSHn; streamline: slightly lower 
output and irequency range than above, with Switch 

""ly $32.00 LIST 

Models RAL (200 ohms]; RAH (2000 ohms). 
Built to Amperite standards; Wo peots. Flat 
response. Triple shielded. Shock absorber. 
Swivel brackel. . $22.00 LIST. 

Finishes: All microphones have the new stand- 
ard Guninetal Finish. Available in Chrome, 
extra, SI. 00 List. 

FREE: WINDOW DECAL, advertising 
your SOUND SERVICE. Four-color 
design, 5'/4 x 9'/4. Write for it now. 




^mperiteQ. 



AMPERITE^^ ^^ 

^^^CROPHOME 



SERVICE NOTES 



dent, D. 11. Wright, "As you undoubt- 
edl.y know there has been considerable 
trouble encountered when high fidelity 
speakers are used. One reason is as 
follows : When an amplifier is devel- 
oping excessive harmonics due to over- 
loading, these harmonics show up in 
the higher freqiiencies and the high- 
fidelity unit or the speaker with a very 
wide frequency range will reproduce 
this distortion with much more vol- 
ume than a speaker having a nar- 
rower range. 

"Therefore, we find while a speaker 
having high fidelity will be unsatis- 
factory when operated with an ampli- 
fier developing excessive harmonies, 
on the other hand it will give much 
more life-like reproduction when used 
with an amplifier having a small 
amount of distortion." 

As explained by Mr. Wright, the 
trouble is not in the speaker, but in 
the amplifier. Obvious solution to the 
problem is not to overload the ampli- 
fier and not to use one having high 
harmonic distortion when high-fidel- 
ity reproduction is desired. 

SERVICE SHOPS USE 
AUTO-RADIO SPARES 

* Many of the more progressive 
auto-radio service men today have 
adopted the policy of keeping two or 
three standard auto-radio sets on 
hand, reports Alfred A. Ghirardi, 
author of many radio books. 

The purpose is to use one of the 
"spares" as a temporary replacement 
set while the car owner's set is being 
serviced in the shop. This elimi- 
nates the necessity of tying up the 
owner's car while his radio set is 
being serviced. 

Service men say that by featuring 
this special service through sign cards 
and printed slips distributed at rail- 
road stations and auto parks, they 
have developed a considerable amount 
of business they would not otherwise 
have gotten from customers who did 
not wish to tie up their cars for an 
auto-radio servicing job. 

DEGENERATIVE AMPLIFIERS 

* One of the more recent circuit 
developments is the degenerative am- 
plifier. With this type of operation 
much higher quality signals are ob- 
tained throiigh the reduction of dis- 
tortion. 

Looking at the operation from a 
(To page 46) 



ATLAS SOUND 
EQUIPMENT 



Let Atlas Solve 
Your P. A. Problems 

p. A. men who know, will tell you the 
value of selecting the right equip- 
ment for the job at hand. To do the 
job right, you must have selection. 
Atlas offers you the widest selection 
of sound equipment available. 
Spring P. A. is here — and if you 
want P. A. dividends, you should 
have the Atlas guide to increased 
sound profits. 

Atlas 1937 Catalog Presents: 

Deflector Baffles, and Floor Stands, 
Indoor Speaker Enclosures, Alumi- 
num Trumpets, Driver Units, Adapt- 
ers, Exciters, Amplifiers, Demount- 
able Baffles, Square Trumpets, and a 
complete line of Microphone Stands, 
and Desk and Banquet Stands — plus 
other P. A. needs. All equipment 
made at the Atlas plant — Immediate 
Deliverv, 



c\ 



N# 



1 1 




Left : Lightweight Baffl. 
Baffle in four types and 
Right : "Velvet Action" Micropli 





"Vari-Defiector" Speaker Enclosure. 

Send For Your Catalog Now! 

Better jobbers everywhere are stocking up 
with Atlas equipment. Write for our sales 
plan. 

ATLAS SOrXD CORP. 

1451 30th St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 



''HEARD 'ROUND 
THE WORLD" 



42 



Radio Today 



NEW "MIKE 

Streamlined in 
Performance and Price 




Small in size, yet providing superb per- 
formance, this new RCA Microphone, 
offers many features for greater efficiency! 



Quality Features That Mean Extra Value 

Triple Chromium finish • Small size — light weight 

Good tone quality — high sensitivity 

No external excitation or power required 

Rugged construction — insensitive to 
mechanical vibration 

Unafifected by change in temperature, humidity, or 
barometric pressure 

May be operated at distances up to 1,000 
feet from amplifier 

Excellent for close talking • Minimum 
response to wind 

Practically non-directional when faced vertically 

New Alnico magnet — retains magnetism indefinitely 



Get your copy of the RCA Commercial Sound Catalog from 
your RCA Commercial Sound Dis- 
tributor or write direct to Camden. 

To centralize responsibility make your sound system 
RCA ALL THE WAY from microphone to loudspeaker. 

RCA MANUFACTURING CO., INC., CAMDEN, N. J. 

A Service of the Radio Corporation of America 




Now I^^mmardize 
on C'D^^ndensers 

"■There uas a time when I would watch pennies! 
But the couple of pennies I 'saved' by using low 
quality replacement parts for servicing proved 
mighty expensive. Disgruntled customers . . . 
free repeat calls . . . loss of good-will , . . these 
are only a few of the results of my 'savings'. 

"Today I use only the finest replacement parts 
that money can buy. I have found that I keep 
my customers longer, get a good portion of my 
business through recommendations and I don't 
lose money on free repeat calls. 



"Yes sir 

densers. 

any longer — / know that the best is the cheapest 

in the end." 



I I standardize on Cornell-Dubilier con- 
They're the 'tops'. I don't kid myself 



FOR MORE THAN TWENTY-SEVEN YEARS CORNELL- 
DUBILIER HAS BEEN THE WORLD'S LARGEST 
EXCLUSIVE MANUFACTURER OF CONDENSERS « « 

Send for complete catalog No. 137 A today! 

MICA • DYKANOL • PAPER 
WET and DRY ELECTROLYTIC 

CORNELL-DUBILIER CORPORATION 
1022 Hamilton Blvd., So. Plainfield, N. J. 




Ikll £lill I 



11 



March, 1937 



43 



Model 
Chassis 



I. F. 
Peak 



FAD A* 

Continued from 

February 
RADIO TODAY 



108 

109 

111 

112 

126 

127 

128 

130 

131 

132 

133 

134 

135 

140 

140L 

140SW 

141 

142 

145 

145L 

145SW 

150 

151 

152 

155 

156 

157 

158 

159 

160 

161 

162 

163 

164 

165 

166 

167 

168 

170 

171-DC 

171-AC 

172 

173-DC 

173-AC-DC 

190 

191 

192 

193 

211 

212 

216 

242 

246 

250 

251-DC 

253-DC 

254 

255 

260 

261 

262 

266 

267 

270 

271 

272 

273 

280 

281 

290 

291 

311 

312 

315 

316 

355 

512 

532 

1250 

1255 

1262 

1265 

1450 

1451 

1453 

1460 

1461 

1462 

1463 

1470 

1471 

1480 

1481 

1556* 

1582* 

1583* 

KO-220 

KO-C 

KO-C-110 

KOF 

KU 

KW 

KY 

NA 

NE 



470 
470 
470 
470 
262.5 
262.5 
262.5 
175 
265 
265 
265 
265 
265 
175 
115 
456 

265— R 
125— R 
175 
115 
456 

456— R 
265— R 
265— R 
456— R 
456— R 
456— R 
456— R 
456— R 
456— R 
456— R 
456— R 
456— R 
456— R 
456— R 
175— R 
456— R 
456— R 
456— R 
175 
456 
456 
175 
456 

456— R 
456— R 
456 

456— R 
456— R 
456— R 
456— R 
456— R 
456— R 
456— R 
175 
175 

456— R 
456— R 
456— R 
456— R 
456— R 
175— R 
456— R 
456— R 
456— R 
456— R 
456— R 
456— R 
456— R 
456— R 
456— R 
456— R 
456— R 
456— R 
456— R 
456— R 
175 
175 

456— R 
456— R 
456— R 
456— R 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 

456— R 
456— R 
456— R 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 

265— R 
265— R 



NF 
NK 
RA 
RC 
RE 
RG 
RK 
RN 
RO 
RP 
RS 
RU 
RV 
RW 
RX 
RY 



125— R 

262.5 

175 

175 

175 

175 

175 

470 

470 

175 

470 

265 

470 

265 

125 

470 



12C6 

40 

41 

42, 42CIB 
42TOB 

43, 43CIB 
43TIB 

51 
52 
53 
54 
55 
56 

57, 57TO 

58, 58C1 
58T1, 58T2 
60 

61 

62 

63 

64 Auto 

64 Batt. 

65 

66 

67 

68. 68T6 

69. 69T7 
70 

71 

72, 72C2 
72C3, 72T3 

73, 73C3B 
73T3B 

74 

81 

82 

90 

91, 91C4 

91 C5, 91T4 

100 

110 

120 

346, 346S 

347 

516 

541 

814 

816 

840 

841 

1014 

1040 

4015 

4115-B 

5103 

5106 

5107 

5108 

5109 

5111 

5112 

5141 

5143 

5212, 5212A 

5241 

5312, 5312A 

5341 

5416 

5445 

5516 

5545 

5619 

5645, 5645A 

6010 

6044 

6210 

6244 

6317 

6346 

6416, 6416B 

6445-B 

6517 

6546 

6616 

6645 

6717 

6746 

7014 



456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 

177.5 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 

177.5 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 

177.5 

177.5 
456 
456 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 



. F. PEAKS 



Model 
Chassis 



I.F. 
Peak 



and 



Letters. T, C, CK. 
etc., after model 
No. indicate cabinet 
styles and have been 
purposely omitted. 

FAIRBANKS- 
MORSE* 



COLOR COOING 



PART V 



Model 
Chassis 

7040 

7042 

7052 

7117 

7146 

8110 

8141 

8218 

8247 

8248 

9047 

9048 

10049 

10050 

11049 

11050 

B-6 

C-6 



I.F. 
Peak 

456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
177.5 
177.5 



FISCHER- 
SMITH* 



62 
71 
72 

74 



40-18805 

111 

111-40 

113 

118, 118P 

1440 

5601 

B18805 

FT6 

FT9 

N 



175 
262 
262 
262 



175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
260 
252 J^ 
175 
260 
260 
260 



FORDSON* 



32 

41 

42 

61 

102 

320 

321 

480 

680 

6320 

7371 

14371 

FP 

FT 

FU 

FW 



456 
456 
456 
456 
465 
465 
465 
465 
465 
465 
465 
465 
456 
175 
456 
456 



FRANKLIN 



43-AB 

45-E 

53 

54-A, 54-C 

54-CL, 54-G 

54-L 

55-CU 

55-D 

55-EU 

55-GU 

63-L 

65-HU 

65-VU 



94 

100 

102 

105C, 105PC 450 

200 175 



456 
465 
456 
456 
456 
456 
250 
465 
250 
250 
130 
250 
f 250 
\ 456 
450 
175 
175 



RADIO TODAY 



MARCH, 1937 



FREED 
See Freed - 
Eisemann 

FREED- 
EISEMANN* 



25 

26 

27 

28 

51 

55 

56 

56-L 

58 

60 

62 

66 

67 

70 

72 

74 

76 

77 

78 

90 

94 

97 

98 

99 

353 

3.54 

355 

356 

357 L 

357 P 

358 L 
360 
360 X 
365 

365 X 
366 

366 LW • 
367 
368 
369 S 
406 
432 
466 
467 
469 
475 X 
482 
A-7 
A-9 

BG-357-P 
C-310-AC 
C-367 
C-482 
FE-48 
FE-55 
FE-57 
FE-58 



456 
456 
456 
456 
175 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 

450— KC 
175 

450— KC 

115 

456 

462.5 

456— KC 
456 
456 
456 
456 
132 
456 
456 
456 
132 
456 
132 
456 
456 
456 
456 
462 

• 115 
462 
115 
456 
456 
456 
462 
462 
462 
462 
462 
456 
456 
456 
456 
462 
462 
456 
456 
456 
456 



FE-60 

FE-62 

FE-70 

FE-76 

FE-98 

H-357-L 

H-357-P 

MB-7 

MB-9 

P-55 

Q-358 S 

R-369S 

T-368 P 

T-367 S 

U-363 

V-360 

W-380 

W-382 



456 
456 
456 
456 
175 
456 
456 
175 
175 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 



25 

26 

27 

31 

31 LW 

33 

33 LW 

35-LW 

35-SW 

49 

58 

66 

83 

83 LW 

104 

237 

238 

250 

311 



GAROD* 

456— RC 
456— RC 
456— RC 
456— RC 
456— RC 
456— RC 
456— RC 
132— RC 
456— RC 
456— RC 
456— RC 
456— RC 
456— RC 
456— RC 
456— RC 
456— RC 
456— RC 
456— RC 
456— RC 



JESSE FRENCH 311-LW 456— RC 



5X 

6X 
7X 
U-1 



175 
175 
175 

175 



FRESHMAN 
See Belmont 



GAMBLE- 
SKOGMO 



20 C 7 
20 C 8 

26 SI 

27 CI 
27 C 2 
27 C 5 
77 
430 
540 
550 
575 
670 
675 
780 
780 B 



456 
456 
175 
175 
175 
175 
456 
456 
456 
456 
175 
175 
370 
456 
456 



GAYLORD 



510S. 510U 

520S, 520U 

610S, 610U 

620S, 620U 

710S. 710U 

720S, 720U 

800 

801 

900 

lOlOS 

lOlOU 

1100 



456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 



c- 


-Condensers 
R.M.A. color 


coded 


R- 


—Resistors 
R.M.A. color 


coded 


j _ 


—R.M.A. color coding 
used throughout the set 



456— RC 
456— RC 
456— RC 
456— RC 
456— RC 
456— RC 
456— RC 
456— RC 
456— RC 
456— RC 
456— RC 
456— RC 
456— RC 
456— RC 
456— RC 
456— RC 
456— RC 
456— RC 
456— RC 
456— RC 
456— RC 
456— RC 
456— RC 
175— RC 
456— RC 
175— RC 
175— RC 
456— RC 
456— RC 
456— RC 
M33LW 456— RC 
456— RC 
PC 31 456— RC 
Letters, A, C, D, 
E, H, KC, LC, 
after model No. 
indicate cabinet 
style. 

GENERAL 
ELECTRIC* 

(Corresponding 

RCA models in 

parenthesis) 

A52 465 — RA 
A53 465— R 

A54 465— R 

A55 465— R 

A60 (M32) 175 



337 

370 

371 

380 

381 

512 

514 

520 

600 

620 

730 

731 

830 

831 

930 

931 

1240 

1650 

2150 

4110 

5140 

5240 

B-37 

G-15 

G-35 

G-37 

G-38 

G-61 

M32 

M33 



A60 

A63 

A64 

A65 

A66 

A67 

A70 

A75 

A81 (P31) 

A81 

A82 

A83 

A85 

A86 



465— R 
465— R 
465— R 
465— R 
465— R 
465— R 
465— R 
465— R 
175 
'465— R 
465— R 
465— R 
465— R 
465 — R 



A87 465— R 

A88 465— R 
A90 (M30) 175 

A125 465— R 

A205 465— R 

A20S 465— R 

A208 465— R 



175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
460 
175 
460 
460 
175 
175 
175 
175 
465— R 
465— R 
465— R 
465— R 
465— R 
465— R 
465— R 
465— R 
465— R 
465— R 
465— R 
465— R 
465— R 
465— R 
465— R 
465— R 
465— R 
465— R 
465— R 
465— R 
465— R 
465— R 
465— R 
465— R 
465— R 
465— R 
465— R 
465— R 
465— R 
175— R 
175— R 
175— R 
175 
175 
H51 (Rad82) 175 
H51R (Rad82R) 

175 
H71 (Rad86') 175 
H71R (Rad85R) 

175 
H72 (RAE59) 175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 



B40 (M34) 

B52 (Ml 16) 

B81 (142B) 

B86 (241B) 

C41 (M105) 

C60 (M107) 

C61 (M123) 

C62 (126B) 

C67 (223) 

C70 (135B) 

C75 (235B) 

D50 (MlOl) 

D51 (M104) 

D52 (M108) 

D72 (M109) 

E50 

E51 

E61 

E62 

E68 

E71 

E72 

E76 

E79 

E81 

E86 

E91 

E95 

El 01 

E105 

E106 

E115 

El 26 

El 29 

E155 

ED7C 

ED7M 

ED7T 

ED8C 

ED8P 

ED8T 

ED8M 

EDIOC 

EDIOT 

FA60 

FA61 

FA80 

H31 (R80) 

H32 (R50) 



H91 

H91R 

J70 (R4) 

J72 (R70) 

J72 (R70N) 

J75 (R6) 

J80 (R8) 

J82 (R71) 

J83 (R73) 

J83A (R73) 

J85 (R12) 

J86 (R72) 

J87 (R75) 

J87A (R75) 

J88 

JlOO (R74) 

J105 (R76) 

J107 (R77) 

J109 

J125 (R78) 

J125A (R78) 

JZ835 (R023) 175 

JZ822A (R24A) 

175 
JZ822 (R24) 175 
JZ826 175 

JZ828 175 

K43 (100) 460 
K50 (R28) 175 
K50P (R28P) 175 
K51 (R28) 175 
K51P (R28P) 175 
K52 (110) 175 
K53 (111) 175 
K53M (115) 175 
K54 (RE40) 175 
K54P (RE40P) 

175 
K55 (210) 175 
K58 (310) 175 
K60 (R37) 175 
K60P (R37P) 175 
K62 (RU) 175 
K63 (120) 
K64 (121) 
K64D (127) 
K65 (RSa) 



175 
370 
370 
175 



175 
175 
175 
175 
445 
445 
445 



K66 (220) 
K66M (222) 
K78 (330) 
K79 (331 1 
K80 (140) 
K80 (140E) 
K80X (141) 
K80X (141E) 445 
K82 175 

K85 (240) 445 
K88 (340) 445 
K88X (340E) 445 
K105 (261) 175 
K106 (R90) 175 
K106P (R90P) 

175 
K107 (260) 175 
K126 (280) 175 
KZ62P (RE18) 

175 
L50 (R22S) 175 
L51 (R22W) 175 
L52 (112) 175 

L52A (112A) 175 
L53 (114) 175 

M41 (101) 460 
M42 (103) 
M49 (301) 
M50 (117) 
M51 (118) 
M51A (118) 
M52 (119) 
M55 (214) 
M56 (211) 
M61 (128) 
M62 (125) 
M63 (124) 
M65 (221) 
M66 (226) 
M67 (224) 
M68 (321) 
M59 (322) 
M81 (143) 
M85 (243) 
M86 (242) 
M89 (341) 
M105 (262) 
M107 (263) 
M125 (281) 
M128 (380) 
M128R (380HR) 

175 
M129 (381) 
M655 (225) 
N60 

S22 (R7) 
S22A (R7A) 
S22D(R7DC) 175 
S22X (R7) 175 
S42 (R9> 175 

S42B (R43) 175 
S42D(R9DC) 175 
S132 (RIO) 175 
SZ«P(RE16) 175 
U50 175 

U51 456 

U55 456 

U70 456 

U75 456 

UlOO 456 

GENERAL 
ELECTRONICS 

AW-50 465 

GENERAL 

MOTORS 

"DAY-FAN" 

See also 
United Motors 



460 
460 
460 
460 
460 
460 
460 
460 
460 
460 
175 
370 
460 
460 
370 
460 
460 
460 
460 
460 
460 
460 
460 
175 



460 
460 
175 
175 
175 



210 
211 
216 
217 
219 
220 
250 
251 
252 
253 
254 
255 
256 
257 
258 
281 
292 
293 



175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
535 
175 
175 



K65P (R38P) 175 



GENERAL 

TELEVISION* 

"American" 

"General" 

"Greeley" 

7 456 

7C 456 

9 456 

10 175 
12 175 

To be contintied 

in .^pril 
RADIO TODAY 



•Indicates that the listings have been checked by the manufacturer. 



Whenever possible, it is recommended that reference be made to the 
manufacturer's service notes for complete information on the set. 



While every effort has been made to have this listing 100% ac- 
curate, in a compilation of this magnitude, some errors are possible. 
The editors will appreciate hearing of these mistakes. Copyright 1937 by 
Caldwell-Clements, Inc. Not to he reprinted without written permission. 

44 



Acknowledgment is given to the following additional sources of information: Bernsley's 
Official Radio Service Handibook, Gernsback's Official Radio Serznce Manuals, Ghirardi's 
Radio Field Service Data, Hygrade Sylvania's Auto Radio Servicing & Installation, National 
Union's Official Chart of Peak Frequencies, Rider's Perpetual Trouble Shooters Manual. 



Radio Today 




It's the experienced servicemen who have gone for 
the Model 771 Checkmaster in a big way. This was 
to be expected ... for we built Model 771 to give the 
serviceman everything he needs for trouble shoot- 
ing and estimating in one compact, easy-to-carry 
case. He has all this in the Checkmaster . . . pro- 
viding as it does for a thorough check of tubes, as 
well as for checking continuity, resistances and 
voltages. In addition, it has a spare compartment 
for tubes or tools. This means time saved in answer- 
ing emergency calls . . . for he need carry only 
this one, compact and complete Checkmaster for 
quickly getting at the root of the trouble. 

But to make the Checkmaster even more useful, 
it has been strikingly designed and finished for 
counter use as well . . . making it the handiest, most 
versatile tool any serviceman can own. Inexpen- 
sive, too. And the name it bears is the best guaran- 
tee of instrument dependability and long life. Be 
sure to see the Checkmaster at your jobber's, or 
return the coupon for complete information. 



March, 1937 



FEATURES: 

INGENIOUS WESTON SWITCHING CIR- 
CUIT ACCOMMODATES TESTING OF 
TUBES WITH WANDERING FILAMENT^ 
Wired for testing latest tubes. H 

Neon short check while tubes are hot. 
Cathode leakage test of CORRECT DESIGN. : 
Individual tests on elements of diodes. ^H 
Voltage ranges for point-to-point testing. ^^ 
High and low resistance ranges for continuity 
testing with built-in filtered power supply. 
Actual condenser leakage measurements — 
all types of high and low voltage condensers 
— read in ohms on meter scales. 

All readings on one legible, open-scale meter 
... the famous WESTON rectangular 301, , 
Positive line voltage control. ^| 

Weston Electrical Instnunent Corp., 597 Frelinghuysen Ave., 
Newark, N. I. . . . Rush me bulletin on the Checkmaster and 
other Radio Instruments. 

NAME 

ADDRESS 

CITY ....STATE , 

45 



High 

FIDELITY 

is the trend 



SERVICE NOTES 




AR43— $75.00 



• Brush sound cell 
construction is a 
"natural" for high 
fidelity. Faithful re- 
sponse over a wide 
frequency range is 
an inherent feature. 




• When Brush mi- 
crophones are rated 
as being flat in re- 
sponse, for a given 
frequency range, 
they ARE FLAT- BR25— $37:50 
No mechanical or electrical compensa- 
tion is necessary. 



• These facts have 
been realized and 
hundreds of sound 
cell mikes are be- 
ing used for sound 
B1— $32.50 level analysis and 

calibration purposes-Plus the thousands 
in "P. A." and broadcast applications. 

Technical Data on request 

TAe BRUSH 

Development Co. 

3313 Perkins Ave. 
Cleveland, Ohio 



1 


J 




(from page 42) 
uoii-technical basis, it cau be re- 
garded as a system where part of the 
output signal is fed into the input. 
In this way a portion of the distor- 
tion from the output is impressed on 
the input and it goes through the 
amplifier and cancels part of the 
original distortion. 

The accompanying- chart prepared 
hy Hygrade-Sylvania Corp. shows 
how the distortion is reduced when 
degeneration is used. Since part of 
the output signal is fed to the input, 
a larger signal must be applied to the 
amplifier to compensate for the feed- 
back voltage. In other words the 
sensitivity of the amplifier is reduced. 

The amount of distortion present 
is approximately proportional to the 
sensitivity of the amplifier — with 50 
per cent sensitivity, the distortion is 
50 per cent of the original amounx 
(shown in chart). If the sensitivity 
were reduced to %, the harmonic dis- 
tortion would drop to V4,. With high- 
gain amplifiers the reduction in the 
sensitivity is not very serious. 

Wliile the curves are for a 6L6 
tube, degenerative circuits can be 
applied to any type of amplifier tube 
including triodes. When properly 
used, degeneration will give to pen- 
tode amplifiers approximately the 
same high quality performance that 
is found with triodes. More on this 
subject to follow in future issues. 

ENGINEERING ASPECTS OF 
ADJUSTABLE FREQUENCY 
CHARACTERISTIC 

*■ The problem confronting in- 
stallation organizationis has always 
been one of obtaining the proper type 
of reproduction — that is, the public 
address system should do only one 
thing. It should increase the sound 
intensity but in no way alter the 
character of the sound, comment Web- 
ster-Chicago engineers. 

It is relatively easy at the present 
time to obtain public address equip- 
ment that has a high order of faith- 
fully reproducing, at an increased 
volume, the sounds or the program en- 
tering the microphone. 

We have, however, generally speak- 
ing, one portion of our system which 
is ordinarily fixed and that is the en- 
closure in which the installation is to 
be made. Generally it is difficult to 
obtain the proper type of acoustic 
treatment in the halls, churches, the- 
atres, etc., ordinarily encountered. 




Distortion is greatly reduced by the 
use of degenerative or feed-back circuits. 



Consequently, we find that although 
the reproducing equipment is of a 
high order, the tone emanating from 
the loud speakers is frequently unnat- 
ural, or at least so sounds to the 
listener, and this is, ordinarily speak- 
ing, caused by the fact that an audi- 
torium can be regarded as a resonant 
chamber with all of the complex 
sound patterns that can be set up in 
an enclosure of this type. 

The most common trouble that we 
encounter is excessive amount of low 
frequency response, which makes the 
reproduction sound boomy and un- 
natural. Sound men in the past have 
frequently undertaken the job of al- 
tering the response characteristics of 
their equipment to accommodate it 
to the specific installation. General- 
ly, however, these alterations are ex- 
pensive and take time, although the 
results that can be obtained with the 
proper type of frequency compensa- 
tion are well worth the effort. For- 
tunately, amplifiers are now being 
made which have adjustable frequency 
characteristics. 

SUPPRESSION OF IGNITION 
INTERFERENCE 

* Emerson in its instaUation 
manual has a list of suggested meth- 
ods of reducing ignition interference; 
here they are: 

If, when the receiver is in operar 
tion, and the motor is running, the 
ignition interference is excessive the 



46 



Radio Today 



YOUR COMPETITOR 

isn't such a bui 





Get to Know Him . . . Get 
Him to Tell You About 
Sylvania! 

• You've heard us talk a lot about 
Sylvania tubes in the last few years. 
We'd like to have you get your 
information first-hand for a 
change. 

Do this for us the next time you 
get a chance, will you ? Call on that 
nearest competitor of yours who 



handles Sylvania tubes. Get the 
whole story straight from him! 
He'll tell you he likes to do busi- 
ness with Sylvania . . . that the men 
who represent them are square 
shooters, looking out for his inter- 
ests first of all. He'll probably 
mention the fair list prices, too and 
the chances are he'll tell you how 



little trouble he has now with kick- 
backs and rejects. Get to know this 
man. He has a story that will mean 
dollars and cents to you ! 

Or u'e will be glad to tell you the 
story and send you free technical 
and sales helps. Write to the 
Hygrade Sylvania Corporation, 
Emporium, Pa. 



SYLVANIA 



THE SET-TESTED RADIO TUBE 



March. 1937 



47 




Selection of Finest Mikes Made 

For tke finest fidelity of music we recommend the Air 
line-Brush crystal (A). Many speakers prefer the Airline 
Velocity (B) because of its directional characteristics. 
Servicemen often select the Airline Dual Diaphragm 
(C) for its ruggedness and all-round performance. Any 
of these may be used with .AIRLINE amplifiers. 

• 60 WATTS UNDISTORTED OUTPUT. Cares for prac- 
tically all rental installations. 

• WILL USE ANY TTPE AND ANY NUMBER OF SPEAKERS 

UP TO 15. System comes complete with 4 latest 
Utah or Jensen Magic Metal Types. 

• USES 2 MIKES AT ONCE— any two hi-gain mikes 
may be used at the same time . . . need not 
be alike. In addition, a carbon mike may be 
used in conjunction with an adapter, so that 
actually 3 mikes may be used! 

• USES 12 LATEST TYPE TUBES . . . including the 
6L6 Beam Amplifier. 

• 3 SEPARATE MIXER CONTROLS. Permits blending 
of microphones and phonograph. 

• COMPLETE FOR ONLY $10 DOWN 1 Amplifier, 
tubes, 4 speakers, crystal mike and floor 
stand for only $115 cash price! 

Send for Free catalog today giving com- 
plete details on this and other Airline Sound 
Systems. Models range from 5 to 100 watts; 
in price from $12.95 up. 

All Are Sold on Monthly Payment Plan 

MONTGOMERY 
WARD 

Largest Distributors of Sound Systems in U. S. 

CHICAGO • BALTIMORE • ALBANY • KANSAS CITY 

ST. PAUL • DENVER • PORTLAND • OAKLAND 

JACKSONVILLE • FT. WORTH 



I Mail coupon to nearest Ward House for copy 
I of Wards Radio Catalog of Sound Systems. 

j MONTGOMERY WARD Dept. RR-2 



Name- 
Street. 
City - - 
State . 



SERVICE NOTES 



following suggestions should help to 
reduce it to a satisfactory level. 

By-pass dome light wire at instru- 
ment panel with a yi mi. condenser. 

By-pass the low tension lead to the 
ignition eoil with a J^ mf. con- 
denser. 

Shield high tension lead from coil 
and ground to fire wall. 

Shield low tension leads to ignition 
coil. 

Try grounding antenna shield at 
various points, and also try leaving 
shield ungrounded, except at point 
where it is automatically grounded at 
receiver by means of the metal con- 
nector. Move all adjacent wiring 
slightly, and note if it may be coup- 
ling to the battery lead to receiver. 

Bond steering column to fire wall. 

Try bonding exhaust pipe, particu- 
larly if interference is increased with 
passengers in car. 

Bond metal cables or pipes coming 
through fire wall, connecting them to 
the fire wall. If car has wooden floor 
boai'ds, place a screen underneath 
floor mat and note if interference is 
decreased, particularly with passen- 
gers in car. 

Check antenna wiring, making sure 
it is shielded completely. 

Try bonding windshield wiper pipe. 

Cheek ignition system for defects. 

When condensers are used for by- 
passing ignition interference, their 
leads should be as short as possible, 
since often a condenser with leads a 
fraction of an inch long will be very 
effective in places where the same 
condenser with longer leads would be 
useless. 

XoTE : It is recommended that the 
charging rate of the car generator be 
increased slightly to compensate for 
the added drain of the receiver. 



CROSS MODULATION 
INTERFERENCE 

* For some time past, a number 
of complaints of interference have 
come to our attention from owners of 
radio sets who reside within two or 
three miles of a powerful broadcast- 
ing station. The character of this 
interference has been identical in 
practically all cases, in that programs 
from the nearby station would appear 
in the background of all other sta- 
tions tuned in on the standard broad- 
cast band. At certain times of the 
day, we were told that the interfer- 



ence was worse than at other times, 
and all makes of sets appeared to be 
similarly affected. 

We recently completed a very ex- 
tensive investigation, which was made 
to ascertain the cause of the trouble, 
and in an effort to devise corrective 
measures. This investigation has re- 
vealed that most of the interference 
has been due to conditions outside of 
the receiver itself. It was found that, 
in certain localities of an area affect- 
ed with this trouble, the interference 
was not present even though it ex- 
isted a few hundred feet away. 

It is not our purpose to go into 
great detail to explain the cause of 
the trouble, as it is of a rather com- 
plex nature. Briefly, it was found 
to be a phenomenon of cross modula- 
tion, with the result that the signal of 
the interfering station appeared on 
the carriers of the other stations when 
these signals entered the receiver. It 
will therefore be seen that little can 
be done to relieve this condition ; 
however, in some cases the difficulty 
was eliminated by one or more of the 
following remedies : 



DYNAMIC 
MICROPHONES 

Are Increasing in Popularity 




— have greater sensitivity 

— are free from inductive pickup 

— have no background noise 

^can Tvork %vith long lines 

•^are sturdiest ever produced 

^are ^veatherproof 

^are small in size 

^— are reasonable in price 



Where life and property are at stake, air- 
line operators prefer Radio Receptor's mov- 
ing coil dynamic microphones for reliability. 



We solicit requests for special sound and am- 
plifying equipment. . . Send for our latest Bul- 
letin .^013. . . We are pleased to send this to you. 

RADIO RECEPTOR CO., Inc. 

S51 WEST 19th ST., NEW YORK, N. Y. 



48 



Radio Today 



MILLION 

VOLT-OHM-MICRO AMMETERS 




VO Model CM 

5,000 OHMS PER VOLT 20,000 

10 MEGOHMS DIRECT. 30 

$19.95... Dealer's NET price. . $29.95 

0-300 Microampere scale. .0-60-300 

5 lb Weight 6 lb. 

IXE^RE are tvvo instrnnieuts designed 
■■"■^ by John W. Million and built to lab- 
oratory standards. They are distinctly 
BETTBR instrnnients at reasonable 
prices. They are a credit to the many 
other Million instruments in service. 

Both instruments have: AC and DC 
voltage ranges of 0-3-30 -300- 900 ; DC 
mllliampere ranges of 0-3-30-300-600; 
resistance ranges of 0-10.000 ohms and 
read megohms n-ith self-contained bat- 
tery; direct reading DB power level 
scale ; zero adjuster ; plainly marked 
switches; handy carrying strap; size, 
S''x5"x3i^". 

See your jobber or write to 

Million Radio and Television 
Laboratories 

397 Wesf Superior St. Chicago. III. 




NEW UIRRD 

AUTO AERIALS 




MODEL T. A.— The"Tur-rellc."One of the 
osw top aerials featured by WARD for 1937. 

NO DRILLING IN TOP 
SEND FOR CATALOG TOOAY 

WARD PRODUCTS CORP. 

WARD BLDG. CLEVELAND, OHIO 

CANADA: ATLAS RADIO CORP., TORONTO, ONT. 
FOREIGN: UNCOLN EXPORT CO., NEW YORK 



USE THIS COUPON 



WARD PRODUCTS CORP. 
Waid Bldg. ■ Cleveland. O. 
Send inlormation of Waid'i 1937 Auto Aerials. 

Name . . ^__ _„ 

Address ...._ ...... . ..... . ... 

Check n Dealer D lobber D Service Man 



Installation of a wave-trap tuned 
to the frequency of the interfer- 
ing station. 

By-passing the power line in the 
house where the receiver is lo- 
cated. 

Changing the location and direc- 
tion of the antenna. 
■ — Arthur D. Williams Service De- 
partment, Philco-New York. 

FADA COLOR CODE FOR 
CARBON TYPE RESISTORS 

* While the present Fada receiv- 
ers use R. M. A. color coded resistors, 
many of the older models employ a 
private coding, which is reproduced 
herewith. 

Valae In ohms Identlflcation 

125 — Gray with yellow end 
250 — Lisht brown 
500 — Brown with blue end 
750 — Green 
1.000 — Grean with yellow end 
1.200 — Dark green 
1.500 — Green with red end 
2,000 — Black 

2.500 — Red with yellow end 
3.000— White 

4,000 — White with oransre end 
5.000 — Orange 

6.700 — Blue with white end 
7.500 — Yellow with blue end 
10.000 — Blue with yellow end 
13,000 — White with blue end 
15,000 — Blue with red end 
20,000 — Green 

25.000 — Yellow with ereen end 
50,000 — Blue 
70,000 — Violet 
125,000 — Gray 
250,000 — Yellow 
500,000 — Brown 
2.000.000 — Red 

PUSH ALL-WAVE ANTENNA 
INSTALLATIONS 

* That spring is the best 
time to push all-wave antenna instal- 
lations is the belief of 0. E. Hapton- 
stahl, sales manager of the Thomas 
Electric Co., Des Moines, Iowa. 

With the summer activities ahead, 
and the family anticipating the joys 
of outdoor recreation, spring isn't 
always a propitious time to push 
radio sales, complain some. However, 
it is an excellent time for the service- 
man to install antennae. 

The following sales argument was 
brought forth. Generally a more sat- 
isfactory aerial can be installed dur- 
ing the milder temperatures, than in 
cold weather. The radio owner should 
not wait until fall or winter when 
he contemplates the purchase of a 
new set or wider use of his present 
instrument. 

In the spring the aerial can be 
placed higher from the ground, for 
spots clear of foliage are easier to 
determine because the branches indi- 
cate the clear spaces which are safe 
to use for securing guy wires, and 
better work can be rendered by work- 
(To page 56) 




A Small End-Lead 
Resistor 

in a new and con- 
venient package. 

Still the same ceramic body 
enclosing the conducting ma- 
terial now offered with end 
leads for greater conservation 
of space. 

Like all Centralab Resistors 
they are thoroly insulated 
from all adjacent parts. 

Its smaller mass results in re- 
duced capacity coupling to 
adjacent parts. Its effective 
resistor length is actual 
length of resistor . . . and its 
r.f. resistance is practically 
the D C Resistance. 



Size i/g" X 11/16" 
i/o watt. 



-rated at 



Specify Centralab 
at your jobber. 



<' "••'•■:-"> 



Cen 



^!^J 



Mil-wanUee, Wis. 

Division of Globe Union, Inc. 

BRITISH CENTRALAB, Ltd. 
Canterbury Road, Kilburn 
London, N,W,6, England 

FRENCH CENTRALAB CO. 

118 Avenue Ledru-Rollin 

Paris XI, France 



March. 1937 



49 



SUNRISE NOTE IN APPLIANCE BIZ 

Trends in Spring promotion oF new radio-electrical merchandise. 



"BOX" SATURATION 



* Sales goal for refrigerator deal- 
ers to aim at is noted in the TVA 
territory, in east and middle Ten- 
nessee, north Alabama and north 
Georgia. 

W. W. G-ambill, Jr., president, 
Gambill Distributing Co., Nashville, 
Tenn., recently reported that "the per 
cent of electric refrigerators to the 
number of persons taking cnrrent iu 
the area is the highest in the country 
— 65 per cent." Gambill distributes 
Crosley products. 

To account for the high per cent 
of ownership, Mr. Gambill cited the 
wide publicity given the TVA, and 
"favorable rates made by the private 
power companies because of federal 
government efforts toward lower 
rates." Refrigeration saturation point 
for the nation was given as 46.01 per 
cent. 



STUDIO KITCHEN 



* When General Electric goes to 
work this Spring on a brand new 
modernistic home for Station WGY, 
Schenectady, N. T., one of the broad- 
cast studios will take an extraordi- 
nary form. 



Eoom will look like a modern elec- 
tric kitchen, complete with refrigera- 
tor, range, dishwasher, etc. Broad- 
casts that deal with these matters 
will originate in this studio, which 
will have its glass panels fixed so that 
guests in the building may see the 
interior at all times. 

WGY's new home will be two 
stories high, with glass blocks on the 
front and on the two end walls. All 
of the five studios will be air condi- 
tioned and otherwise up to the min- 
ute; plans were drawn by the famous 
architects, Harrison & Fouilhoux. 
WGY continues as part of the NBC 
Bed Network. 

ISLAND DISPLAY SELLS SMALL 
RADIOS AND APPLIANCES 

* A center island fixture at the 
McPherson, Kan., Electric Company, 
has built sales volume in small radios 
and appliances for a year, according 
to E. W. Ek, manager. 

The frame is of white pine and wall 
board. The outside measurements are 
12 feet by 40 inches. It is painted 
in three-tone stipple. 

Six plugs permit quick connection 




SUNDAY BROADCASTS sponsored by an FM jobber, Olmsted Co., Syracuse, 
N. Y., features local night clubs plus Conservador. Event attracts up to 1,400. 



for demonstration of table and con- 
sole models to the customer. It is 
wired for aerial hook-up with fifty 
feet of wire used inside. 

Repair parts, wiring devices and 
accessories are shown in the twenty 
bins, set off by glass dividers, ten to 
a side. Inside space permits storage 
for overstock. 

"We have found this an effective 
set-up for display and demonstration 
of console models," says Mr. Ek. 

JOBBER CHECKS APPLIANCE 
PREFERENCES 

* Effective way in which to de- 
termine types of wanted merchandise, 
actually indicated over the signature 
of prospective buyers, has been intro- 
duced by the Tri-State Distributing 
Corp., Cincinnati jobber. 

T. M. Williams, Tri-State sales 
manager, tried the stunt at a recent 
electric-appliance show. All persons 
attending were given cards on which 
was printed the query: "Now that 
you have seen the show, what would 
you like to own?" 

Persons totaling 2,344 said they 
wanted a radio, and named their fa- 
vorite make. Number of those want- 
ing electric washers was 470. And 
349 wanted ironers. Mr. Williams 
regarded these results as significant 
of relative popular interest in elec- 
trical specialties. 

ROOM-COOLERS FOR 
SUMMER PROFIT 

* Dealers have a chance to get 
busy on a new kind of merchandise 
designed for summer selling. It's a 
portable room cooler in the popular- 
price bracket, presented by air condi- 
tioning engineers for homes, offices, 
stores, hotels, hospitals, etc. 

Having the enormous appeal of 
"summer comfort to everyone," the 
unit is 12%" high by 27%" long, 
rests upon the window sill of the room 
to be conditioned. Top of the gadget 
has a ribbon of felt upon which fits 
the lower sash of the window, and all 
openings at either side of the machine 
are filled by special wings. It plugs 
into the ordinary light circuit. 
{To page 52) 



50 



Radio Today 



0UT1D SMASH RECORDS AGAIN! 



■r 




ir 



THE NEW 3M]?-/)>^ FRIGIDAIRE 



...«^/5feNEW INSTANT CUBEREIEASE 



The 1937 sales sensatioa! Only Frigidaire 
has it! Instantly releases ice-cubes from 
trays' Yields 20fo more ice by endmg melt- 
ing under faucet! A single demonstration 
puts Frigidaire 'way out in front for 1937. 



The 1937 Frigidaire Line includes 

4 De Luxe Models 5 Master Models 

5.1 to 8.2 5 cu. ft. sizes 4.1 to 8.2 5 cu. ft. sizes 

3 Special Models imperial Model 

5.1 to 7.2 cu. ft. sizes 15V2 cu. ft. size 

The D3-37-3.1 cu. ft. size 




All 5 BASIC SERVICES 

FOR HOME REFRIOERATION 



1 CRERTER ICEIBIL"^ 

2 SeR SJORAGE-ABILITY 

. SeATeSdE END-ABILITY 
5 GREATER §M-»8'^"\„e 

Cuts Current Cost lu _ 



...7^ NEWS WAYADJUSTABLE INTERIOR 



STORAGE-ABILITY never known in home refrigeration be- 
fore! Includes a 2 -way Frozen Storage Compartment . .. 
2-way Cold Storage Tray . . . 3-way Sliding Shelf . . . 2-way 
Multi- Storage Section. 9 quick, easy adjustments, with 
dozens of variations ! 



... aft^c/^xK^m^^f!^^^^^^ 



An exclusive Frigidaire advantage with un- 
beatable sales-closing power! Cuts current 
cost to the bone ! And proves it with an actual 
electric meter test! The simplest refn^eratrng 
mechanism ever built! Only 3 moving parts, 
including the motor. 



Frigidaire announces a sensational new 

line . . . and the biggest, most dramatic 

selling program in its history 

• YOU'LL DO STILL BETTER WITH FRIGIDAIRE IN 
1937. Because Frigidaire is putting back of its 
sensational new line the most sweeping, far-reach- 
ing Selling Program in its history! Sales strategy 
which retains everything that shattered all sales 
records in 1936. Plus new strategy— h\ii\t around 
"ALL 5 Basic Services for Home Refrigeration." 
Plus, also, the introduction of the new Instant 
Cube -Release — greatest improvement ever made 
in ice convenience! All backed by an even heavier, 
more concentrated advertising schedule! 

Everything about the 1937 program is complete, 
dramatically presented,sales-compelling in the high- 
est degree. We're all set to go! Watch Frigidaire 
selling men set the fastest pace on record. They're 
bound to do still better with Frigidaire in '37! 



'9^ 



Watch for the smashing an- 
nouncement ads appearing 
in 157 newspapers from 
coast to coast and in all 
these leading publications, 
beginning March 7! 

The Saturday Evening Post 

Collier's 

Liberty 

Time 

Cosmopolitan 

National Geographic 

American Home 

Better Homes and Gardens 

American Weekly 

This Week 

Good Housekeeping 

Woman's Home Companion 

McCall's 

Holland's 

The Graduate Group 

Electricity on the Farm 



YOU'LL D0 5i^^5^fe WITH FRIGIDAIRE IN '37! 






March. 1937 




fiVV'.VV 

ww.vW 



PORTABLE PLUG-IN air-conditioner, to bring cool comfort to modest homes 
and offices, presented by President Roper of Pleasantaire Corp. 



♦ Faii'banks-Moi'se officials have 
recently held a series of dealer meet- 
ings in various parts of the nation 
to honor the 1937 FM Conservador 
models. Special attention was given 
to presentation effects, and three 
crews were in charge, one headed 
by W. Paul .lones. Other crew mem- 
bers were Joe Hopwood, Tme Wag- 
oner, Parker H. Eiicksen, Jolin S. 
Garceau, Earl Hiatt, W. S. Sliaw, 
Henrj- Hay^vard and Wni. ^Macke. 

* Dealer meetings \vitli Crosley 
jobbers as hosts continue throughout 
the country to finish the presentation 
of 1937 Shelvadors. These distribu- 
tors have held shows: Appliance 
Distributing Coni., Boston, Mass.; 
Lincoln Sales Corp., Baltimore and 
Washington; Interstate Electric Co., 



New Orleans; Ontario Electric Co., 
Buffalo, N. Y.; Tenk Hardware Co., 
Quincy, 111. ; Central Illinois Whole- 
salers, Inc., Springfield, 111.; Hicb 
Disti'ibutmg Co., Des Moines. la.; 
H. E. Dunn, Inc., Omaha, Neb. ; .Ad- 
vance Appliance Co., Peoria, 111.; 
Davidson Sales Co., South Bend, Ind. 

* Norge's biggest ad campaign 
broke early this month in 12 5 key 
cities of the country. Newspaper 
campaign in every jobber area in 
the U.S. got under way, via increased 
plugging. Features of the big 1937 
drive will be more magazine ads. na- 
tional outdoor advertising, radio pro- 
grams under jobber control, news- 
reels, "minute movies," movies for 
women prospects, and other sales 
helps. 



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CONVENTION CHATTER as carried on (left to right) by Lenford Harrison, 

mgr. dealer dept., Crosley Corp.; Harold Goldstein, pres., H. M. Sadler, sales mgr., 

H. Swartz, Anchor Lite Appliance Co., Pittsburgh; Luther E. Reid, American 

Elec. Co., St. Joseph, Mo. Latter is oldest Crosley jobber. 



Dealers need not be air condition- 
ing experts in order to handle this 
"Xorthwind" unit, wliicli i? made by 
the Pleasantaire Corp., .304 East 45th 
St., ISTew York Citj'. That company 
declares that the I^Torthwind "cools, 
de-humidifies, washes and quietly cir- 
culates 300 en. ft. of air a minute."' 
Dealers may tell prospects that the 
machine's cost of operation is about 
the same as a large refrigerator. 

Salesmen are given the chance to 
match the home decorative scheme of 
their prospects in point of color. Con- 
ditioner comes in two colors, ivory for 
residence use, shadow brown for office 
or commercial use. Also available is 
a unit in standard base iiller for paint- 
ing or spraying by the dealer. 

Crosley Shelvadors 

* 1937 line of Crosley refrigerators 
feature more economy, more conven- 
ience, more usable space, more accessi- 
bility, more beauty. 4 deluxe models — 
4.3 to 7.1 cubic feet. Seven other 
models from 3 to 7.1 cubic feet are in 
the line. Features are electrosaver 
hermetic unit, 18-point temperature 
control, built-in thermometer, Freon 
F-12 refrigerant, Dulux white exterior, 
porcelain Interior, shelvador. Crosley 
Radio Corp., 1329 Arlington St., Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio— R.\Dio Today— see also 
advt. p. 54. 

* Fi-igidaire's recent series of 
sales conventions had an attendance 
of 26,915 persons, an increase of 18 
per cent over 1935. Meetings were 
held in all key cities, preparatory to 
national introduction of new prod- 
ucts on March 7. 

* To the newly remodeled show- 
rooms of the jobbers. True & Blanch- 
ard, Newport. Vt., recently were in- 
vited the firm's dealers to view the 
1937 Fairbanks-Morse Conservador 
refrigerators. Lively show was the 
first to be held by the company in 
several years. 

W. W. True, president of the 
company, is winter vacationing in 
Florida, and the other news is that 
Clarence A. Blossom has joined the 
firm and will work in northern Ver- 
mont and New Hampshire. 

* Newly appointed manager of 
the department store sales division 
for GE is Ralph C. Cameron. An- 
nounced at the same time was John 
P. Raiiibault as manager of the elec- 
tric clock section; A. E. Pierce as 
sales manager of the same section. 
This news follows the recent appoint- 
ments of E. H. Vogel as manager and 
C. M. Wilson as sales manager of the 
radio sales division. 

* Electrical Appliance Dealers 
•Association of BrookljTi, Inc., at its 

meeting of Mar. 2, voted to send a 
representation to the New York 
State Legislature to encourage the 
passage of the Feld Bill. Chief ef- 
fect of that bill is to give manufac- 
turers power to fix retail prices on 
trade-marked goods. 



52 



Radio Today 




Behind this name- 
plate IS the greatest 
improvement m home 
refrigeration — 



— the CONSERVA- 
DOR, shelf-lined in- 
ner door that prevents 
front-of-shelf crowding 



Penny meter demonstrations are helDinn FM dealers to clinch sales. 
If you have not received your Penny Meter display, write, wire, or 
phone your distributor or Fairbanks, Morse & Co., at Indianapolis. 



SHOW your prospects a refrigerator 
so outstandinp'ly different that your 
competitors down the street, up the 
street, and across the street can't show 
them one like it. 

When you demonstrate the new Fair- 
banks-Morse CONSERVADOR Re- 
frigerator, you are doing just that. You 
are not showing little differences that 
don't even register in your prospect's 
memory. You are not showing her just 
another "me too" refrigerator that looks 
almost identically like all the others she 
has seen. You are showing her big 
differences . . . big improvements . . . 
features found in no other refrigerator 
in all the world. 

Where Else Can They Find These? 

First, the CONSERVADOR; exclusive; 
patented; biggest difference of all. Then > 
Self - Sealing Crisper, Sliding Fruit 
Drawer, and Utility Storage Compart- 



ment. Two-fifths of this refrigerator's 
contents can be removed without even 
opening the main food compartment! 
Where else can they match that for 
convenience? 

Show the first modern refrigerator 
door in the industry; simplified tem- 
perature control; automatic overload 
protector. 

Show a refrigerator that not only has 
reserve power for any heat-wave emer- 
gency, but also costs fess, not more, 
to operate! And you can prove it. You 
can show — right on your sales floor — 
how long it will run on a penny's 
worth of electricity, at your prospect's 
rate. 



FREE FLOOR PLAN 

For a limited time only — A Free Floor Plan 
on your initial order. This, plus a limited 
recourse finance plan at no cost to the 
dealer, means that you can cash in on the 
early buying market by going into action 
now. 

Your distributor has the details 



FAIRBANKS 



If Has What You Need 
to Clinch Sales'. 

Your prospect can see that there IS 
something different and better in re- 
frigerators and that the Fairbanks- 
Morse CONSERVADOR has it. You 
know the sales-clinching pov/er of visi- 
ble, understandable differences — es- 
pecially when there is a good reason 
for every one. They clinch sales where 
little differences fail. Write the Fair- 
banks-Morse distributor in your terri- 
tory now. Get the complete story of 
the "hottest" refrigerator franchise in 
the industry today. Fairbanks, Morse 
& Co., Home Appliance Division, 2060 
Northwestern Ave., Indianapolis, Ind. 



Ofher Fairbanks-Morse Producfs: 
WASHING MACHINES, IRONERS. 
RADIOS. AUTOMATIC COAL BURNERS 



MORSE 



CL'<n^4.-eAA/-<i'CU^ /^^f^^^-e^i^eZ^ 



March, 1937 



53 




/ 



... The Crosley SHELVADOR Alone i 
Offers This EXTRA USABLE SPACE! 

■ \ 

I 

Make This Startling Visible Demonstration; 




THIS MUCH IVIORE l 

EXCLUSIVELY IN THE CROSLEY SHELVADOR 



The Crosley Shelvador offers the buyer more usable 
food storage space than any other electric refrigerator 
on the market . . . and you can prove it conchisively 
right on your sales floor! 

In the illustrations above showing this dramatic 
demonstration, the whole tableful of food — 48 pieces 
in all — is placed first in an ordinary refrigerator, filling 
up all the normally used shelf area. Then all this 
food is transferred to the Shelvador, which takes 
every piece of it without excessive crowding. 

What more powerful and convincing sales argument 
can be offered for any refrigerator than such a dem- 
onstration! . . . particularly when it is backed bv: 
1. MORE BEAUTY; 2. MORE CONVENIENCE: 
.3. MORE ECONOMY; 4. MORE ACCESSIBILITY 



and offers such selling features as the sensational 
Electrosaver, the Stora-drawer, new tilting shelves, 
special removable shelf section, spacious Crosley 
Crisper, Built-in Thermometer, 18-point temperature 
control, and a dozen others. 

It's going to be tougher than ever to sell against the 
Crosley Shelvador in 1937 . . . and easier than ever 
to sell the Shelvador. Alert dealers who know 
refrigerator value and are familiar with public demand 
are enrolling under the Crosley banner and assuring 
themselves of the greatest year in their history 
with— THIS MUCH MORE EXCLUSIVELY IN 
THE CROSLEY SHELVADOR. See your Crosley 
Distributor for complete details of the Crosley 
Franchise. 



THE CROSLEY RADIO CORPORATION, Cincinnati - POWEL crosley, Jr., President 



Home of "fhe Nation's Station" — WLW — 70 on your dial 



THE CROSLEY SHELVADOR . . . Patented, Exclusive Feature 



54 



Radio Today 




MODEL HB5-71 — Food storage capacity 7.1 
cubic feet (N. E. M. A. Rating)^ total shelf area 
16.77 square feet. 6 shallow and 1 deep ice cube 
trays with a total capacity of 168 icecubes in one 
freezing. Features include: Shelvador. New 
Hermetic Unit Model T-5 with large double- * j 

section Still Air Condenser, Float Valve, Freon ^^ '«• 

F-12 Refrigerant, 18-Point Temperature Control. *•' 

Built-in Thermometer, Hinged Shelf, Chromium -Plated dull finish 
door to Fast Freeze Cube Compartment. Porcelain Interior with Acid- 
Resisting Porcelain Bottom, beautiful Dulux Exterior, Chrome finish 
hardware. Automatic Interior Light. Quick-acting Ice-Tray Release. 
Dimensions: SQ%" high. 33^^" wide, 29H" deep. 

MODEL HB3-71— Same as above excepting Standard Q3 type Com- 
pressor Unit. 



DELUXE MODEL HL5-71— Net capacity 7.1 

cubic feet (N. E. M. A. Rating), shelf area 16.77 j 

square feet, 7 ice cube trays with a total capacity 

of 168 ice cubes. Features include: Shelvador. j , 

new Electrosaver Hermetic Unit Model T-5 with j f 

large Double-section Still Air Condenser. 18- ' _ 

point Temperature Control. Built-in Ther- ^^, '^ 

mometer. 5 all Flat Wire Shelves. 2 Hinged 

Shelves, Bottom Shelf has Removable Section, bright Chrome Satin 

Finish Door to Fast Freeze Cube Compartment, 3 Crosley Shelf Jars 

and Covers. 6 Red Beetleware Dessert Cups, Crosley Crisper, Slora- 

drawer. Porcelain Interior with acid-resisting porcelain bottom, 

brilliant white Dulux Exterior, bright Chrome hardware with Blue 

Inlay, .\utomatic Interior Light. Quick-acting Ice Tray Release. 

Dimensions: 583^" high, 33^" wide, 293^ deep. 



Other Standard Series HB Shelvador models avail- 
able: Model HBl-30, 3.0 cu. ft.: Model HBl-31, 
3.16 cu. ft.; Model HBl-36. 3.6 cu. ft.; Model 
HBl-41, 4.1 cu. ft.; Model HB1-.50, 5.07 cu. ft.; 
Model HBl-60, 6.0 cu. ft. All HB models also 
available with Standard Q3 type Compressor Unit. 




*»!'« tucrat^ *■ 



Other De Luxe Shelvador Models available: 
Model HL5-13, 4.3 cu. ft.; model HL5-50, 5.03 
cu. ft.; Model HL.5-61, 6.1 cu. ft. All De Luxe 
Shelvador Models have the Crosley ELECTRO- 
SAVER, the sensational T-5 Hermetic Unit with 
Double- Section Still \ir Condenser. 




Red Beetleware Cups- 
for quick freezing 
salads and desserts. 



efrigerated compart- 

nect for storing bulky 

foods. 




CROSLEY ELECTROSAVER 
FEATURED IN DELUXE 
MODELS... « 

"■** B^^^w ■ ■ ■ i^ummed up in one 
word, "ELECTROSAVER". all the years 
of earnest study, superior engineering skill 
and tireless experimentation combine to 
bring worthwhile savings to every Shel- 
vador user. The new Crosley T5 Her- 
metic Unit is a marvel of efficiency and 
its exceptional operating economy, its 
long life and quiet dependable perform- 
ance, represent the liighest possible value 
in electric refrigeration today assuring 
enthusiastic customer satisfaction. 



Removable bottom shelf sec- 
tion to accommodate roasts. 



Key-type, ciuick- 





IS-Point Temperature Control. Radio-type 

illuminated dial provides faster or 

slower freezing speeds as desired. 




tincruish the Crosley Elec- 

Non-toxic Freon refrigerant . . . 

al high side float expansion sys- 

. . high reserve capacity, resulting in 

:r running time, faster freezing and 

greater ice-making capacity. 




iuilt-In Ther- 

-isible proof of 
afety zone food 
ompartment tem- 
peratures. 



of the CROSLEY ELECTRIC REFRIGERATOR 



March, 1937 



55 



{/BIOCHANCt} 



&■, s^ 



UOOD INSTANTANEOUS 
RECORDINGS 
ARE SOMETHING 



NEW 



Your customers will be amazed 
when they hear their first Presto 
recording . . . they are so different 
from any homo recordings they 
have ever heard before. 

MAKE THIS SIMPLE TEST to 
discover the interest among your 
own customers. Send for a supply 
of dealer folders on the Presto 
Model D recorder. Distribute them 
to your best customers and watch 
the response. When you need the 
machine wire us at 137 W. 19th St., 
New York City, or 'phone us at 
Chelsea 2-642S. Shipment will be 
made the same day. 

Over 300 live customer inquiries 
now on file will be turned over to 
dealers stocking Presto equipment 
within the next 30 days. 

PRESTO 

RECORDING CORP. 

137 W. 19th STREET, NEW YORK, N.Y. 

WORLDS' LARGEST MANUFACTURER OF 
INSTANTANEOUS RECORDING EQUIPMENT 

Export Division (Except Australia & Canada) 

THE M. SIMONS & SON CO.. INC. 

25 Warren St., New York Cable: Scmontrice, N. Y. 

Australia and New Zealand Agents & Stockists 

A. M. CLUBB & CO., LTD. 

45 Kinj Street Sydney, N.S.W., Australia 

56 



SERVICE NOTES 



men operating in mild temperatures 
than during freezing weather. They 
are not encumbered and handicapped 
by mittens and are inclined to spend 
more time at such details as splicing 
and securely fastening all wires, in- 
stead of hurriedly returning to 
ground or inside where a greater de- 
gree of comfort was afforded. 

A list of good prospects was worked 
last spring, and beginning in April, 
twenty antennae installations were se- 
cured weekly until summer set in. 

SERVICE TIPS* 

Phiico Model 70 Howling 

■* This trouble is usually due to vi- 
bration of the condenser plates. If the 
rubber washers on which the gang con- 
denser is moimted cannot be replaced, 
a repair can be made by placing the 
rubber washers on which the set is 
mounted under the chassis. When this 
is done the bolts should be left loose 
in order to obtain a floating effect. 



Stromberg Carlson 
Models 38, 39. 40, 41 
(2nd type) 



Weak, 

Station 

Hiss 



■* If this condition is cleared by 
placing a finger on the R.F. type 58 
tube control grid, the pre-selector coil 
primary may he found open or 
grounded to the metal braid of the 
antenna binding post lead. 

Superheterodynes 

Using Screen Grid Ose.-Det. Insensitive 
At High Frequencies 

•*: Replacing tubes in this case will 
form only a temporary repair, as the 
trouble will show up again when the 
tube is used for only a short while. 
To effect a permanent repair, decrease 
the value of the bias resistor connected 
from the cathode of the osc.-det. tube 
to the chassis. This may be eliminated 
but the best value may be found by 
experiment. One-third of the original 
value has been found quite satisfactory 
in numerous cases. The best way to 
select the correct value is to use an 
output meter and an oscillator, adjust- 
ing the resistance value for maximum 
value. 



Atwater Kent 
Models 67, 67B 



Excessive Volume 
On Local Stations 



* You will probably find an open 
in the black wire leading from the 
volume control to the on-off toggle 
switch or a poor contact in the switch 
itself. The switch may be tested by 
shorting it. Bend the switch contact 
spring for greater tension or, if neces- 
sary, replace it with a new one. 

Victor R-6 Erratic Operation 

* The screen bleeder resistor from 
plate to screen (16,000 ohms) is con- 

"Service tips are selected from the files 
of H. K. Bradford, President, Capitol Ra- 
dio Research Labs, Washington, D. C. 



tinued to the cathode circuit with a 
8,000 ohm resistor both of which be- 
come defective. Reduction in value of 
one will put an overload on both and 
hence both must be replaced in such 
an event. Very often this fact is 
neglected in receiver repairs. 

Auto Radio Noise From Brakes 

* The brakes of many automobiles 
will generate electrostatic charges 
which, on discharge, will set up inter- 
ference. To overcome this trouble the 
brake rods may be bonded. If these 
charges are permitted to discharge to 
the chassis as soon as they are cre- 
ated, they can cause no difficulty. In 
some cases the brakes must be relined 
to overcome this difficulty, but this is 
a very rare condition. 

SERVICE MEETINGS ON RADIO 

*■ Series of thirteen "Service 
Meetings of the Air," via electrical 
transcriptions, are to be inaugiirated 
by ECA in all sections of the coun- 
try, according to F, B. Ostman, ECA 
Service Manager. 

A thorough test was made in the 
Philadelphia area and members of 
the Philadelphia Eadio Servicemen's 
Association voted enthusiastic ap- 
proval of the plan after the first 
broadcasts. 

Every lecture has been prepared 







P. A. is Big Business. LAFAYETTE 
has met tliis fact w^ith CO-ORDI- 
NATED SOUND SYSTEMS. Com- 
plete paclcaged units — pre-tested 
— ready for easy installation and 
long faultless operation. Priced 
right they offer a system for every 
conceivable P. A. application. 
SEND FOR FREE NEW 1 16 
PAGE SPRING CATALOG NOWl 



UIHOIESRLE RnDIO SERUKE 10m 

NEWYORK,N.Y..CHICAGO. ILl.,A T L A N T A , 6 A. 
100 SIXTH AVtNUE 901 W.JACKSON ■lV0.*430W.PEACHTHtE ST., N.W. 



WHOLESALE RADIO SERVICE CO., Inc. 



■ 100 SIXTH AVENUE, NEW YORK 

■ 

■ Please rush FREE Calaioa No. 68 -1 ! C 7 

■ Name _._ „ 



I Address... 

!c«y 



State 



Radio Today 




c/jowme XiXiXi.Jinance Plan 
HELPS RADIO DEALERS SELL PROFITABLY 



COMMERCIAL CREDIT COIMPANY financing has 
proved its value to thousands of success- 
ful merchants as an aid in closing sales. Its 
name is so well-known to American families, 
there is no hesitance in accepting CCC financing 
. . . no doubt about the fairness of the terms. 

But your financial interest in time payment 
sales doesn't end with the signed order and 
the down payment. There has to be a final 
reckoning before your full profit is assured. 



Commercial Credit Company's twenty-five years 
experience in credit investigation and collection 
is a bulwark of strength for you. It weeds 
out the bad risks that mean trouble and loss 
from failure to complete payments. It assures 
you of the maximum of profit. Get the most 
out of the big year ahead of you with Commer- 
cial Credit Company service. Nation-wide 
operation through 179 offices in principal cities 
assures close cooperation, prompt remittance. 



COMMERCIAL CREDIT COMPANY 



COMMERCIAL BANKERS 
CQNSaLIDATEQ CAPITAL 




HEADQUARTERS: BALTIMORE 
AND SURPLUS $60,000,000 



FINANCING SERVICE FOR MANUFACTURERS. DISTRIBUTORS AND DEALERS THROUGH 179 OFFICES IN THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA 



March, 1937 



57 



SERVICE NOTES 



and recorded by leading engineers 
from the RCA labs, on a wide variety 
of subjects close to every service en- 
gineer's interests. With the knowl- 
edge that the public will be listening 
in, each broadcast will emphasize the 
technical knowledge, the special equiis- 
ment and experience required for 
servicing radio sets. This angle of 
approach is calculated to discourage 
amateur attempts at home repairs 
and to show the necessity for engag- 
ing a competent service engineer to 



ENTIRELY /IL IN DESIGN 
PERFORMANCE ^ BEAUTY 




Shore ZEPHYR 



CRYSTAL RECORD REPRODUCER 



• The ZEPHYR marks an impor- 
tant milestone in pickup progress. It 
brings you basically new improve- 
ments of far-reaching significance in 
electric pickup design. Exclusive 
"needle-tilt" Balanced-Tracking re- 
duces record wear . . . increases rec- 
ord life. Improved wide-range fre- 
quency characteristic and better 
transient response give you higher 
fidelity . . . more life-like reproduc- 
tion. "High-Lift" streamlined arm 
allows plenty of room for easy con- 
venient needle changing. Plays 10 
and 12-inch records. Furnished with 
31/2 ft. shielded cord, mounting 
screws, and complete instructions. 

List Price $12-°0 

Order a ZEPHYR now! Let your 
own tests prove how much better 
it really is! For complete technical 
data, write for Bulletin 205T. 

Licensed under patents of the Brush Development 
Company. Shure patents pending. 



lHH^i 



MICROPHONES 



Z25 WEST HURON STREET • CHICAGO, U. S. A. 



inspect and "check-up" the radio set 
for the best possible radio reception. 
Valuable prizes will be awarded to 
servicemen for the best letters on the 
service subjects covered. 

CHICAGO IRSM CONV^TIOK 

* Plans are being laid to arrange 
a program for the fifth annual IRSM 
Convention at Chicago that differs 
from the usual type of technical ses- 
sion; and in addition, arrangements 
have already been made for speakers 
of renown who will talk on inspira- 
tional subjects. The purpose of this 
latter type of lecture is to instill a 
greater degree of self-confidence in 
the members of the service profession. 
Convention is scheduled for June 10 
to 1.3 at Hotel Stevens. 

THIS CARD FILE TELLS TALES 

* A SIMPLE card system which 
acts as its own record — ledger, mail- 
ing list, ready reference, and many 
other things in one, is used by Jack 
Muthart of Allentown, Penna. This 
is how it works. 

The telephone rings. A call has 
come in for a serviceman. The girl 
in the office immediately puts down 
the call in a Day Book. 

Then the date, name, address and 
phone number is transcribed to a 
record card illustrated herewith which 
becomes a ledger card, mailing list, 
and reference file, all in one, after 
the job is completed. 

The stub of the card is torn off at 
the perforation, and is left with the 
customer, preferably in the radio 
(where it serves a useful check up 
purpose later on in case of com- 
plaint). On the back of the card is 
written just what has been done to 
the customer's radio. 

The card itself follows the job 
through to its conclusion. Mr. Muth- 
art enters the type and model of 
radio on the card, and the bill, which 
is itemized for future reference. The 
card is returned to the shop and on 
the back are entered any "remarks" 
for which there is no space on tlie 
front. 

The original is numbered seriallv. 
in order to keep track of the number 
of calls and cards written dail,y, to 
cheek with the call book, and also to 
know whether all serial numbers are 
accounted for at the end of each day 
or week, which in turn tells Mr. 
Muthart whether all calls have been 
properly attended to. In this way 
nothing is overlooked or neglected. 




PHONE 2-4610 W«*. 

RADIO HOSPITAL 

DEPENDABl-E RADIO REPAIRING 
ASK JACK 

Allentown, pa. 




This tag provides a complete record 
for the service shop. 

After the job is completed, the card 
is then filed alphabetically. This 
record serves as a complete customer 
record and reference ledger. 

"In this way I know when I get 
the radio back, just what I have 
done," explained Mr. Muthart. "A 
customer cannot slip anything over 
on me. When I caL. at a home, all I 
have to do is to pull the card out of 
the radio and I can tell at a glance 
what day the set was fixed and all 
about it. If necessary show it to the 
customer so they know their memory 
is somewhat faulty. 

"Or if they call up on the phone, 
or come into the store, all I have to 
do is to pull out that record card. 
This card index also serves another 
purpose. Suppose a call comes in. 
I immediately refer to my file before 
I make the call and I can instantly 
find out whether they paid me 
promptly or not. 

"In other words I get a complete 
picture of the customer's credit situa- 
tion. If they are slow to pay, for 
instance, I look over what their trou- 
ble is, tell them what it will cost, 
and that it will be spot cash. If they 
hedge, I know I can scratch them off 
my list and that my call is wasted. 

"This system was started after 
forty jobs which I had done failed to 
pay and wanted charge privileges. I 
had to have some way also of keep- 
ing track of my calls and repair serv- 
ice, and a ledger or other system was 
too much work for a cash business." 



58 



Radio Today 



BOOKS FOR SERVICEMEN 



"ALIGNING PHILCO RECEIVERS" 

By JOHN F. RIDER 

* The book represents the first 
time that alignment data on the en- 
tire Philco line, from the first set 
ever produced to the latest, has been 
gathered in one comprehensive work. 

The information was prepared in 
cooperation with the Philco engineer- 
ing department and is authentic and 
complete in every respect. The order 
followed in the tables is the same that 
the serviceman uses when aligning the 
receiver on the bench, presented in 
the most convenient form for fast anil 
accurate alignment operation. Costs 
$1 and has 160 pages. 

Published by John F. Eider, 1440 
Broadway, ISTew York, N. Y. — Kadio 
Today. 

"THE RADIO HANDBOOK" 

By FRANK C. JONES 

* Revised 1937 edition of hand- 
book deals largely with "ham" radio, 
but fundamentals of electricity and 
radio, together with charts and data 
on construction of equipment will in- 
terest radio servicemen. 

Major portion deals with construc- 
tion and operation of short-wave re- 
ceivers and transmitters. Book will 
give the radio technician a fairly 
good idea of why sets are built as 
they are and how to get the most out 
of any radio — either broadcast or 
shortwave. The "ham" will find this 
book of great help in building and 
operating his equipment. 

A supplement will be issued during 
the year to all purchasers of the book 
for the sum of ten cents. 

Published by Pacific Radio Pub. 
Co., Inc., Pacific Building, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. Price $1.50 — Radio Today 

"ELECTRON TDBES IN INDUSTRY" 

By KEITH HBNNEY 

* As indicated by its title, Hen- 
ney's book deals with the industrial 
application of tubes, including the 
vacuum, gaseous, and photo-electric 
types. The second edition has been 
completely reset and material of very 
recent dates added. 

The beginning chapters of the book 
deal with the theory of tubes and 
their associated circuits, which pro- 
vide a background that helps in un- 
derstanding the actual applications. 
Literally hundreds of typical cir- 
cuits are shown and briefly described. 
Xumerous references are made to 
books and periodicals so that the 



reader may go to the original sources 
for more detailed discussions. 

The book is recommended to those 
interested in learning of the many 
applications of amplifiers, oscillators, 
photo-tubes, rectifiers, thyratrons, 
grid-glow tubes, and cathode-ray 
tubes to industrial uses. For the 
serviceman it will provide an insight 
into the wide uses to which tubes are 
being put — and it is quite likely that 



in the future the wide-awake radio- 
man will find the servicing of elec- 
tronic equipment entrusted to his 
skill. 

Volume has over 500 pages and 
costs $5. Published by McGraw-Hill 
Book Co., New York. — Radio Today. 



NEW LITERATURE 



* Separate sheets on I. P. trans- 
formers, midget condensers, transmit- 
ting condensers are offered by Ham- 
marlund Mfg. Co., 424 W. 33rd St., 
N. Y. C. New policy originated by 
Lewis Winner is to send only those 




Cathode Ray 
OSCILLOGRAPH 

WOBBULATOR 

2 Model 77 ^^,|uj„^,^ 

Instruments FOR the cost of ^ 

Why pay over $100 for your Triumph Instruments Cost Less 

oscillograph and sweep fre- Model 820 1" Oscillograph 

quency oscillator when you can with i/^;^,3jo°°;„vt^„"-', --?; 

buy both for $49.95? ? ? and 4 beam controls, your best buy— ^03.33 

Model 800 3" Oscillograph 

1 11/r 1 1 TT - """• '^ '° SO.OOO '^y=l« linear sweep, 

The Triumph Model 77 is dual amplliieis, synchronous locking, eRI RQ 

, , . , , , , , and 4 beam contr ols. Lab, style. Only ^OJ-O" 

both an oscillograph and wob- ^odel 180 Electronic Sweep 

bulatOr in one instrument ! It test oscillator for use with any type 

combines the 1" cathode ray TrfnlXwobbS.tr-'"" '^'^'^^: $46.00 

tube with a wide range linear Model 120A Signal Generator 

^.^ -^.«J 4.U« t-^-w^e^ifts aIa^- Direct reading dial, calibrated mi- 

SWeep and the tamOUS elec- ^^^„^i, attenuation, no leakage, 100 kc --ft OB 

tronic sweep band wobbulator to 75 mc, 30% Mod q>£a.33 

pioneered by Triumph years ,^°e'Jia°^.N:p"e3^otlu"b1rmatf 

aero. Dual amplifiers provide hot leakage, and performance tests, maq gg 

^ , , , - , Accurate, reliable, simple ly ti J» J<J 

the highest sensitivity possible Model 300 Multirange Meter, 

and the synchronous locking official 1000 ohm per volt factory 

. T .1, . standard. 6 ac-dc volt ranges, 3 ohm Cl c AC 

circuit stabilizes any trace and 2 m.a. ranges, portable, handy. . . . ^IJ-JJ 

within the frequency range of Model 310 Volt-ohmmeter for 

the 15 to 35,000 cycle! sweep. ^a\%\'a'??oVoohms'p'er°vo^t."^' '°'' $7-85 



Model 77 is supplied com- 
plete with six tubes in a porta- 
ble carrying case, ready to 
operate. Elaborate instructions 
and extensive applications are 
included. Send for your copy 
of instructions before you buy. 



4015 W. Lake, Chicago. 111. 
Please send catalog and FREE data on 
"How to Operate An Oscillograph.'' 

Name Address 

City State 



March, 1937 



59 



niL dLdG's mi not 

allh./ 




X XERE'S why the Aictuius 6L6G tube is recog- 
nized as being individual by both radio technicians 
and amateurs. . . . 

Months of painstaking research in the Arcturus 
laboratory have developed an unique testing 
method Twhich assures exceptionally lowr grid cur- 
rent for every 6L6G with an absolute minimum of 
distortion. Every tube is individually measured 
for power output and resulting sensitivity. Two 
separate noise tests (the last one in an actual radio 
receiver) bring truly remarkable freedom from 
noise while the excellent emission life assures 
maximum power output over a longer period of time. 

Guarding and insuring Arcturus efficiency are 137 
separate tests and checks that every tube must 
pass before being shipped. No wonder then, they 
have earned the reputation. . . . 

The Quality Tube Of The Industry 

ARCTURUS RADIO TUBE COMPANY 

NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 



INDEPENDENT TUBES FOR DEALERS WHO 
DO THEIR OWN INDEPENDENT THINKING 




FAST 

VACATION 
SELLER 

PORTO MATIC 

WORLD'S FINEST PORTABLE 
AUTOMATIC PHONOGRAPH-RADIO 

Sweeping the country in popularity 



Patented construction will play and 
change 8 records of any standard 
make automatically. 
Felt-lined receiving tray stores rec- 
ords and protects them. 
Luxurious cowhide leather case. 

Lehman rad 

1013 MADISON AVENUE 



Remarkable clarity, volume, faith- 
fulness and beautiful tone. 
Built-in Aerial. AC-DQ foreign 
current. Short wave reception. 
Good territories available. Write 
or wire for details now. 

O SALON, Inc. 

NEW yORK 





CONTINENTAL 

Carbon 
Spark SUPPRESSORS 



• Out where the test begins — out where 
stations are Few and far between, your car 
radio needs all the sensitivity its circuit will 
permit. CONTINENTAL Carbon's new 5000- 
ohm low-voltage-coe(Ficient spark suppressors 
effectively squelch ignition interference, thus 
releasing the avc circuit and the full sensi- 
tivity of your set. 

Make this test — tune in a distant station 
while driving on a country road at 30 to 50 
miles per hour. Shut off your ignition and note 
if the radio reception is better. If it is better 
with the motor shut off, you need CON- 
TINENTAL suppressors. 

For spark plug suppression select S27, S20A 
or S21, in 5000-ohm resistance. Use T1 3 or 
Til for the distributor in 10,000 ohms; T17 
for Ford V-8 distributors. Available from 
leading radio jobbers. 



^Continental Carbon IncM 



13910 Lorain Ave., Cleveland, Ohio 

Please send booldet on InterFerence, 10 cents enclosed. 



(Toronto, Canada) 



Name . 



City Jobber. . 



60 



Radio Today 



NEW BOOKLETS 



sheets requested and enclose a card to 
be returned if complete catalog Is 
wanted — thusly catalog is sent only to 
those who specifically ask for it. 

* Cinaudagraph Corp., Stamford, 
Conn., has issued a 16-page two-color 
catalog. No. 237, describing its new 
line of magic magnet speakers. Book- 
let and price list available from the 
Stamford plant. 

* Weston Electrical Instrument 
Corp., Newark, N. J., has just issued 
supplementary data on testing new 
tubes in the following tube checkers: 
Model 682, 770, 771. Data has been 
mailed to all registered owners of this 
equipment. Sheets are also available 
for types 538-R. 672-R, 674-R. 678-R, 
681, 682-R — R indicating rebuilt models. 

* Free to all radio men is a new 
characteristic chart for the complete 
line of regular glass type tubes, pub- 
lished by Champion Radio Works, 
Danvers, Mass. 

* "How to Operate an Oscillograph 
and Wobbulator" is the title of a new 
6-page technical bulletin offered free 
by the Triumph Mfg. Co., 4017 West 
Lake St., Chicago, 111. 

* International Resistance Co., 401 
N. Broad St., Philadelphia, Pa., has 
issued two new booklets: a volume 
control guide available through parts 
jobbers, and a resistance engineering 
manual to be obtained free from IRC. 
Both are handy pocket size. 

* New 6-page illustrated booklet 
on "Genemotor Power Plants" has 
been issued by Carter Motor Co., 365 
W. Superior St., Chicago, 111. 

* Just off the press is the 1937 
issue of Philco's "Parts Price Catalog," 
in which are listed more than 10,000 
items on 38 pages. 

* Spring and Summer 1937 cata- 
log has been issued by Wholesale 
Radio Service Co., Inc., 100 Sixth Ave., 
New York. Distributed free of charge, 
it has 116 pages and over 2,000 illus- 
trations. 

* Either from jobbers or from 
Solar Mfg. Corp., 599 Broadway, New 
York, a new complete condenser cata- 
log (No. 8-S) is now available. 

* Requests for Catalog 135A, ad- 
dressed to Cornell-Dubilier Corp., 
South Plainfleld, N. J., will bring com- 
plete specifications on the firm's new 
type TL capacitators. Company also 
has a new catalog. No. 137A, listing 
a complete line of replacement electro- 
lytic and paper condensers. 

■*• Available on request is a new 
booklet describing the use of recording 
equipment by broadcasting stations 
and advertising agencies, issued by 
Presto Recording Corp., 139 W. 19th 
St., New York. 

* Sent free of charge to all persons 
allied with the radio industry is a 
new volume control guide issued by 



Centralab, 900 E. Keefe Ave., Mil- 
waukee, Wis. New guide has 83 per 
cent more pages than in 1936. 

* Hygrade Sylvania Corp., Em- 
porium, Pa., has issued for March a 
7th anniversary edition of Sylvania 
Neics. As usual, the publication is 
mailed free to jobbers, salesmen, deal- 
ers and servicemen. 

* Additional copies of the "Aero- 
vox Research Worker," which deals 
with phase inversion as practiced in 
Europe and America, have been run 
oft and are available free to anyone 
writing Aerovox Corp., 70 Washing- 
ton St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

* Issued by P. R. Mallory & Co., 
Inc., Indianapolis, Ind., Is a new 41- 



page catalog listing new Mallory and 
Yaxley accessories and parts, as well 
as established items. Booklet carries 
dozens of charts, illustrations, tabula- 
tions, etc. 

•k Forty-page, 1937 catalog issued 
by Insuline Corp. of America, 2 5 Park 
Place, New York, is now available to 
servicemen, amateurs and experimen- 
ters. Copies of the catalog. No. 190, 
available from jobbers. 

• New "RC-13 Receiving Tube 
Manual" has been prepared by RCA 
and copies may be obtained by sending 
25 cents to the Commercial Engineer- 
ing Section, RCA Radiotron Division, 
RCA Mfg. Co., Harrison, N. J. Vol- 
ume includes feature tabulations on 
resistance-coupled amplifiers. 



^ Acclaimed . . . 
for Their True 
Amplification Test 




DEALER PRICE • - ^46' 
MADE IN THREE MODELS 



MODEL, 1502 P.O.E. Tube Tester has 
SliadOT*^ Graph Line Voltage Indi- 
cator. jVeon Inter - Element Short 
Test is made while tube 
is hot. Complete in Quar- 
tered Oak Case. Dealer 
Price 



»36" 



3IODEL. 1503 combines with the 
P.O.E. Tube Tester separate Univer- 
sal A^olt - Ohm - Milliamiueter, Con- 
denser Tester and Deci- 
bel Meter. In same Case C JA (i7 
as Model 1502. Dealer V/ll%>Vl 
Price 



m 



MODEL 1504 same as 
1303 but also combines 
Free Point Tester in side 
panels. Dealer Price .... 



$56" 



SEE YOUR JOBBER 
WRITE FOR CATALOG 



* PMcimm' 

i LECTR I CM. I NSTRUMiNTf, 



The Triplett Electrical Instrument Co. 
193 Harmon Ave., BluAton, Ohio 

Please send me more information on 
DModel 1502;DModel ISOSiDModel 1504. 

I am also interested in 

Name 

Address 

City State 



March, 1937 



61 




SPRING CLEANING 

(From page 10) 

wise to transform the business from 
interstate to intrastate ; because of the 
complicated legal structure necessary 
to accomplish this; and because of the 
possibility of so intermingling inter- 
state and intrastate transactions as to 
result in a violation of Federal Laws; 
and that all of these complications, 
legal or otherwise, would largely dis- 
appear if State Trade Laws for intra- 
state commerce and Federal Fair 
Trade Laws for interstate commerce 
were substantially identical. 

"The Tydings-Miller bill, though it 
pei'mits price maintenance, prohibits 
agreements, contracts and understand- 
ings between competitors with, respect 
to prices, while permitting them be- 
tween a manufacturer or jobber or 
dealer or customer on the nationally 
branded merchandise which he pro- 
duces and sells. 

"Indicating also the strong possi- 
bilities of the passage of the Tydings- 
Miller Bill (which has once passed the 
United States Senate), we mention 
that Congressmen elected in those 
states which have adopted Fair Trade 
Laws as sound public policy may take 
that as an indication of public senti- 
ment in their respective districts and 
favor the same kind of legislation in 
Congress, and if this assumption 
proves' true, the size of the area in 
the nation in favor of resale price 
maintenance, as embodied in the Fair 
Trade Laws, affects a considerable 
number of the members of Corigress. 



Last analysis 



fiiMPERITE (pmpany sei broadway new york 



"We emphasize these points : 

"1. That the Fair Trade Laws of 
the states and the Tydings-Miller Bill 
apply only to commodities bearing 
trade names, trademarks, labels or 
brands in fair and open competition 
with commodities of the same general 
character produced or distributed by 
others, and that they do not apply to 
commodities which do not bear such 
an identification or are not in such 
competition. 

"2. That the sale of the same com- 
modities without a trade name, trade- 
mark, label or brand cannot under 
these laws and that Bill be similarly 
protected by them as they are not 
dealt with in these laws and in this 
Bill. 

"3. Unless other State Laws or Fed- 
eral Laws prohibit it, the names, 
trademarks, labels or brands may be 
removed and the commodity sold by 
any owner without restrictions on 
price by any person owning the com- 
modity." 



62 



Radio Today 



TRADE FLASHES 



* Robert F. Herr, manager of 
parts and service division of Philco, 
has recently summarized the charac- 
teristics of the most active year just 
passed by the Radio >Ianiifactui"ers 
Ser\'ice. RMS replaced about 3,000 
servicemen and added several thou- 
sand. Present membership is about 
19,000 in the U.S., 1,500 in Canada, 
1,500 in Great Britain, several hun- 
dred in other countries combined. 

* Arrangements have been made 
by Continental Radio & Television 
Coi-p. that all Admiral set "paper" 
from their dealers will be accepted 
in the future b}' the Commercial 
Credit Co. of Baltimore, Md., one of 
the foremost credit organizations in 
the country. J. H. Clippinger, vice- 
president and sales manager of Con- 
tinental, announced recently that 
Herbert Weisburgh, 180 Riverside 
Drive, New York, will represent Ad- 
miral sets in New England states. 
Weisburgh is well known in the 
specialty product industry, having 
been identified with several refrig- 
eration organizations in recent years. 
Ross SiragTisa, president of Conti- 
nental, just returned to his desk 
from a stay in New York territory 
where he gave pre-views of the new 
Touch-0-Matic push button tuning 
to interested jobber and dealer 
groups. 

■*• Morris F. Taylor, manufac- 
turers representative, opened on 
Mar. 15 a warehouse at 440 W. 
Peachtree St., Atlanta, Ga., to serve 
jobbers in southern states. A. S. 
Hardy, assistant manager of the 
former Federated Purchaser's At- 
lanta branch, will be in charge. 

■*■ Pierce-Airo Radio Co., Inc., 

510 Sixth Ave., New York, has in- 
formed its distributors in the flood 
areas that it will replace at the man- 
ufacturers' expense all DeAVald mer- 
chandise destroyed in the high water. 

* R. H. Van Dusen, who has held 
the position as office manager at 
New York headquarters of National 
t-'nion Radio Corp., has been ad- 
vanced to assistant sales manager- 
ship. 

National Union has also announced 
the addition of instruments made 
bj' Simpson Electric Co., Chicago, to 
its line of free equipment for serv- 
icemen. Total of six of the Simp- 
son models are available. 

* O. P. Smith, general sales 
manager Utah Radio Products Co., 

Chicago, completed recently a swing 
around the Eastern trade centers 
with J. B. Price, Utah Eastern rep- 
resentative. Mr. Smith brought back 
with him substantial orders plus op- 
timistic comments from all of the 
manufacturers. Looking over sales 
figures on his desk, Mr. Smith found 
that January and February sales for 
Utah showed an increase of 30 per 
cent over last year. 




c/Jppfioved kf 
PHILCO 



I 



"The Higher the Tower the Greater 
the PoM'er'* — and the prreater the 
sales appeal, alsol The Dl N- 
CHARGER is almost TWICE the 
size of the oriliiiary >viiicl charii^er 
and -7% more efficient! The speeial 
extra heavy duty generator is built 
from ail jxew parts — permanently 
oil sealed hearings* Foolproof, The 
perfett PLIS VALUE to use in 
closing h:iftery r:idio sales, 
."^lost prominent set manufacturers 
inclose coizpons in their battery 
models entitling farmers to buT a 
DUX-CHARGER direct from the 
factory. Ton get the sales benefit 
and h.'ive no hand.ing. 
Order a DUX-CHARGER demon- 
strator and get ALL the battery 
set business. 



MAIL THIS C0U PON 



I PARRIS-DUNN CORP. • 

' I Dcpt. 29, Clar-inda, Iowa I 

I Send list of radios on wliicll I can accept these I 

i i $2.50 checks. | 

I I 

I t handle make radios. | 

I Name g 

■ ,^, 3 

I Aiidre^^ g 



110 VOLTS AC ANYWHERE 

KATOLIGHT. JR., AC PLANTS 

Sells itself! 55 pounds. Self-cranking 300 watts, 
and rope-cranking 350 watts. Also 6, 12, 32 and 
110 volts DC. 

300 TO 10,000 WATT AC PLANTS 

Specially designed for sound - truck, amplifier, 
P.A., radio and other work. Self-contained. Self- 
cranking by connecting to auto batteries. 

DIESEL PLANTS 

Full Diesel AC & DC plants. 2, 3, 5, 6 KW sizes. 

* * * 
AC, DC Generators, Rotary Converters; DC 
Plants; Windmill Lighting Plants. 

Dealers, Jobbers, write for details and discounts 

KATO ENGINEERING COMPANY 

MANKATO, MINNESOTA, U.S.A. 




March, 1937 



63 



ON THE TRADE TICKER 



* After 2 5 years' experience In 
handling exports of teclinical prod- 
ucts, Kelvin Engineei-ing Co., Inc., 

106 Front St., New York, will now 
enter the radio field. Firm has vet 
representatives in chief Latin Amer- 
ican markets; is also interested in 
representing makers of intercom- 
municating systems. Kelvin will wel- 
come manufacturers' literature and 
prices. , i 

* Zenith Radio Corp. has estab- 
lished itself in its proud new home 
at 6001 Dickens Ave., northwest sec- 
tion of Chicago. This plant is the 
largest radio factory in the world on 
one floor, and according to Com- 
mandei- E. F. McDonald, Jr., Zenith 
president, will be adequate to handle 
in a modern fashion the firm's expan- 
sion plans. Layout is capable of pro- 
ducing 10,500 radio sets every S 
hours, or nearly 22 receivers a 
minute. 

Zenith will now fabricate its own 



steel into chassis frames and other 
metal parts for home, farm, boat, 
trailer and auto radios. Special pro- 
vision Is made for auto set engineer- 
ing, wherein Zenith is expanding. 

New plant will contain all facilities 
needed for making cabinets, thus re- 
moving the uncertainty arising from 
using outside manufacturers. Elab- 
orate new quarters and equipment 
have been assigned to the engineer- 
ing, technical, service, draughting 
and research staffs. 

* Members of the engineering 
staff and sales force of Arctums 
Radio Tube Co., Newark, N. J., as 
well as the company's jobbers, cut a 
sort of a birthday cake last month. 
Occasion was the 10th anniversary 
of Arcturus' Introduction In Febru- 
ary, 192 7, of the standard base AC 
radio tube. 

♦ Annual report of Hygrade Syl- 
vania Coip. for 193 6 reveals several 
feature facts: net income was 33 per 



cent over 1935, there was a 29 per 
cent Increase in sales volume, an ex- 
tra dividend was paid on common 
stock, a new tube plant was erected 
at Salem, Mass., and extra wage pay- 
ments were made to employees. 

* New company has been formed 
by Robert li. Coombs and Edward J. 
Rooney, known as the Coombs- 
Rooney Co., 88 Fourth Ave., New 
York, to handle radio and electrical 
lines chiefly in the South and Central 
American markets. Mr. Coombs Is 
sailing about March 20th for an ex- 
tensive gelling trip In South America. 

* W. F. Huntington, formerly 
sales representative In the Cleveland 
district, has been assigned by RCA 
to the Atlanta district and will be 
stationed in Florida, succeeding J. R. 
Slocum, deceased. George L. Malsed, 
formerly sales representative In the 
RCA Minneapolis district, has been 
assigned to the Dallas district. Gay 
White has resigned as sales repre- 
sentative of the Dallas district to ac- 
cept a position with RCA-VIctor's 
new wholesale distributor In Dallas, 
the Radio City Distributing Corp. 



SERIES 700 CROWE PANEL CONTROLS for ANY AUTO RADIO 

in 1935, 1936 and 1937 cars 
NEW DOUBLE-UNIT CONSTRUCTION GIVES YOU: 




Ask for Bulletin No. 202. 
G-ives full details on the 
new Series 700 remote con- 
trols, flexible shafts, end 
fittings, and other acces- 
sories. 



l.Same control unit in all cars. 

2. Aiiplane or porthole dial (as specified by car 
manufactuiei) without changing control unit. 

3. Quick installation without diilling, sawing, or 
filing any instrument panel. 

4. Custom control tor any make of radio. 

5. Full covei'age for all i-atios, with or without on- 
off switch, sensitivity switch, tone control, and 
other featiu'es. 

6. Approved styling for evei-y car. 

7. Smooth, dependable operation. 



Order from your jobber. Liberal trade discounts. 

CROWE NAME PLATE AND MANUFACTURING CO. 

1771 Grace St. Chicago — Cable Address: Croname-Chicago 





AUTO RADIO 

REMOTEOCABLE 

REPLACER 




J. F. D. SHAFTING AND CASING 



With the Remote-O-Cable Replacer, a supply of shafting and casing, 
same as used by leading manufacturers and an assortment of fittings, 
you can immediately deliver any length or type of Auto Radio Con- 
trol Cable. Properly connect any auto radio to any dashboard head. 

Auto radio jobbers, distributors and servicemen mrite for full particulars. 

J. F. D. MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

4111 Fort Hamilton Parkway Brooklyn. N. Y. 

•EI* 





PI* 



64 



Radio Today 




R. H. VAN DUSEN, advanced by 
National Union to asst. sales mgr. 

* N. P. Bloom, president of Adler 
Mfg. Co., Louisville, Ky., is believed 
to have set a new record during the 
recent flood. At the crest ot the 
flood, he designed, laid out a boat 
and had it floating in the water all 
in two hours. Adler plant was under 
water on Jan. 27, but by Feb. 17 had 
rushed back to production. Firm 
makes radio cabinets for the trade, 
inlaid tables and other items. 

* Introduced by Consolidated 
Wii-e and Associated Corps., Chicago, 
is a new type package for the firm's 
electrolytic condensers. Eye value 
is based on lively colors and a var- 
nish. 

* Torsion Grip Mfg. Co., Chicago, 
who have been manufacturing a new 
patented tube socket, have joined 
forces with Micarta Fabricators, Inc., 
also of Chicago. Latter firm will 
have exclusive manufacturing and 
sales rights on the Torsion grip 
socket. Micarta President Harry A. 
Olson and Torsion President George 
Duncan were recent guests in New 
York at the oflices of Perry Saftler, 
manufacturers' representative at 2 7 
Warren St. 

* Production space, equipment 
and personnel of the Clarostat Mfg. 
Co., Inc., 285 N. 6th St., Brooklyn, 
N. Y., have been boosted to meet a 
rising volume in jobber business. 

* Wm. C. Gnuiow, president of 
the General Household Utilities Co., 

was honored on Feb. 16 at a special 
dealer luncheon given for him in 
Kansas City, Mo., by the new Gnuiow 
refrigerator distributor there, the 
McNeil-Likens Co. Mr. Grunow con- 
tinued on to California for a similar 
meeting arranged for him at Los 
Angeles by jobbers and dealers. 

•*■ Entering the radio field as a 
manufacturers' representative in 
Bombay, India, is K. R. Srinivas, near 
King's Circle, Matunga. Set manu- 
facturers, as well as makers of parts 
and accessories, are invited to send 
catalogs and complete descriptive 
material. 



• The Tobe Deutschmann Cor- 
poration, Filterette Division, Can- 
ton, Mass., offers a tree consulting 
service, by mail, to any municipality 
regarding all questions of radio noise. 
"We have learned that many muni- 
cipalities, anxious to eliminate radio 
noise, have been timid about contact- 
ing us for fear that this would obli- 
gate them," explains President 
Deutschmann. "We make no charge 
for any consulting service of this 
nature, and we gladly make recom- 
mendations on general or specific 
problems." 

■* Notwithstanding Utah Radio 
Products has one ot the largest and 
most modern factories in the radio- 



parts industry. President Ira .J. 
Owen announces one of the greatest 
expansion programs in the company's 
history. Several departments will be 
completely re-equipped with latest 
developments in automatic machin- 
ery to further increase production 
and enable Utah to maintain delivery 
schedules on its rapidly increasing 
business. The Utah laboratory will 
be one of the finest in the radio 
parts industry, equipped with new 
specially built testing apparatus de- 
signed to maintain quality standards 
of Utah products. Meanwhile the 
office is being fitted out with the 
most up-to-date basic standard cost 
system available. This system, when 
completed, will greatly increase the 
operating eiflciency of the business. 



WHEN YOU 

REPLACE 

RADIO SHAFTS 

USE ONLY 





FLEXIBLE SHAFTS 
and CASINGS 



and here are the reasons why 

They're specially designed and built for 
radio application. 

They're standard original equipment 
on practically all makes of auto radios. 

They provide smooth, sensitive tuning, 
without "stiff" spots or "jumping." 

They assure satisfied customers — and 
that means more business for you. 

• BE SURE to ask your jobber 
for genuine S. S. WHITE 
Shafts and Casings. 

The S. S. WHITE 

DENTAL MFG. CO. 
INDUSTRIAL DIVISION 

10 East 40th Street, Room 2310T 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 



March. 1937 



65 



ON THE TRADE TICKER 



* James F. Weldon, formerly 
with the Atwater-Kent Manufactur- 
ing Co., and for the past ten years 
identified with important export ex- 
ecutive activities, has been appointed 
export manager of the Zenith Radio 
Corp., Chicago. At one time Mr. 
Weldon was associated with the ex- 
port department of the radio division 
of General Motors Corp. 

* General Sales Manager R. M. 
Cobuiii of Xatlonal Union Radio 
Corp. has announced an arrangement 



with Royal Typewriter Co. whereby 
radio servicemen may equip them- 
selves with typewriters by purchasing 
NU tubes. 

■*• C. li. Parris, president of 
Parris-Dium Corp., Clarinda, Iowa, 
who recently visited various radio 
set manufacturing organizations in 
the East, states that the factory is 
now taxed to capacity with new ma- 
chinery recently purchased and that 
manufacturing floor space has been 
increased over 5,000 sq. ft. This 





EXCLUSIVE 

UTAH FEATURES MEAN 

LONGER LIFE 

HIGHER EFFICIENCY 



When you install a UTAH Vibrator — no other ser- 
viceman can do a better job. You have given your 
customer longest vibrator life, freedom from set 
interference, and peak efficiency. 

UTAH Vibrators are TOUGH! We\e protvc/ it by 
gruelling tests. Manufacturers know it too. That's 
why UTAH Vibrators are original equipment in 
more than a million sets. And the 1937 UTAH 
Vibrator is the finest and toughest we've ever made. 

Use UTAH Vibrators on your replacement jobs. 
Prove to yourself they work better, last longer — 
but cost no more. 

Your jobber has UTAH Vibrators for all radios. 

THE NEW UTAH 

brings "bener than new" performance to sets using this tj'pe 
of speaker. 

UTAH has designed a new Permanent Magnet speaker that sets 
a new high in performance and long-time efficiency. Ideal for 
multiple speaker installations. Twenty-two models available in all 
standard sizes from five to fourteen inches. 

Hear them at your jobber's— or write for details. 



EAKER 



UTAH RADIO PRODUCTS CO. 

CHICAGO, U.S.A. 
TORONTO BUENOS AIRES 

ONTARIO, CANADA fUCOA RADIO PRODUCTS CO.) 

"15 y[AIIS OF LEADERSHIP" 




JOHN ERWOOD, vice-pres. and 
gen'l. mgr., Webster-Chicago, now 
busy with big factory expansion. 



expansion was felt necessary in order 
to keep pace with Dun^Charger or- 
ders received from all parts of the 
country. Shipments now include 
more than forty foreign countries, 
and within the last three months the 
company has increased its sales vol- 
ume over 500 per cent with many na- 
tional radio manufacturers accepting 
the Dun-Charger as part of their farm 
merchandising program for the com- 
ing year. 

* R. B. Smith, president Con- 
solidated Radio Products Co., Chi- 
cago, 111., and Joseph Ki-uglick, presi- 
dent Clinton Manufacturing Co., 
Chicago, recently returned from an 
interesting tropical voyage which in- 
cluded a visit to Venezuela, Colom- 
bia, Panama, Cuba and Trinidad. 

* M. Lehman, president of Leh- 
man Radio Salon, Inc., 1013 Madi- 
son Ave., Xew York City, has re- 
ceived a letter from the famous 
orchestra leader, Leo Reisman. Let- 
ter speaks of Port-0->Iatic, the Leh- 
man product: "Of all the machines 
I have ever owned, I find that this 
one reproduces sound most accu- 
rately." Mr. Lehman pioneered the 
portable automatic phonograph- 
radio combination. 

■k Fred K. Bollman, formerly 
with Blackett- Sample- Hummert in 
charee of Stew rt- Warner advertis- 
ing and previously with Erwin Wasey 
Co., in charge of Philco advertising, 
has joined the staff of Hays MacFar- 
land & Co. as an account executive. 

■*■ Within the last two months. 
Radio Technicians Guild of Massa- 
chusetts has added five Chapters in 
the state: Arlington, Brookline, Mil- 
ton, Lawrence and Quincy. Guild is 
expecting Lowell, Worcester and 
others to join in short order. 



66 



Radio Today 



* Several radio manufacturers 
were present at the recent 19 37 
Automotive Accessories Manufactur- 
ers Show held at the Edison Hotel, 
New York City. Sets, tubes and 
parts were exhibited by Alr-KIng 
Products Co., Automatic Radio Mfg. 
Co., Clinton Mfg. Co., Dunhill Radio 
Products, Fada Radio & Electric Co., 
Halson Radio Mfg. Co., Insullne Corp. 
of America, Pierce Aii'o, Raytheon 
Production Corp., Snyder, Inc., Trav- 
Ler Radio & Television Coip., XJni- 
vei-sal Controls, Ward Pi'oducts 
Corp. 

Both home and auto radio sets 
were featured in the exhibits. Indi- 
cating that the manufacturers are 
desirous of having home sets as well 
as the auto sold through automotive 
outlets. 

* "Maity" Camber, veteran fac- 
tory representative for radio manu- 
facturers, has been named represent- 
ative for AutoQiatic Winding Co., 
Inc., East Newark, N. J. Camber 
will cover the metropolitan area and 
will remain representative for Mica- 
mold Radio Corp., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

* Work has started on a new 
1100,000 building for the Crosley 
Radio Coi-p. in Cincinnati. Structure 
will replace the one destroyed by fire 
during the flood period, and will be 
used for shipping and storing radios, 
refrigerators and washing machines. 

* Compilation of "Case His- 
tories" on radios, giving trouble and 
remedy for each set mentioned, has 
now reached over 1,500 in the loose- 
leaf job-data book called "Radio 
Field Service Data," by Ghirardi. 
Volume published by Radio & Tech- 
nical Publishing Co., 4 5 Astor Place, 
New York, has had one supplement 
this year, and will get another in 
June. 

* Picture in the circle on the 
cover of this issue of Radio Today 
shows the towers of broadcast sta- 
tion WEAN, Providence, R. I. West- 
ern Electric equipment. Photo by 
Solari. 




JOBBER & SON, former being L. H. 

Arnold, of the new Arnold Co., parts 

jobber, Richmond, Va. 



* A new director of the Sono- 
tone Corp., New York, makers of 
radios and other instruments for the 
hard of hearing, is Herman Scheib- 
ler, E.E., Ph.D. He liven in Geneva, 
Switzerland, and will work both here 
and abroad for Sonotone. 



* Bob Fogelson, purchasing agent 
for the Chicago division of Whole- 
sale Radio Service Co., Inc., an- 
nounces that he will resign about 
April 1. Active in radio since 1923, 
he has long been an executive with 
big parts and set makers, as well as 
distributors in the Chicago area. 

* Garfield Electric Co., 147 W. 

2 3rd St., New York, has taken on 
the line of Universal refrigerators. 
A. G. Lichtenstein is the firm's presi- 
dent and li. Cowen, appliance man- 
ager. 

■*• The 4 50 radio dealers and 
their wives who were guests of the 
General Electric Co. on a winter 
vacation cruise to Bermuda, returned 
to New York Mar. 5th. Trip offered 
some special sightseeing chances, all 
manner of sport and entertainment. 
Cruise committee was headed by D. 
W. May and other GE officials aboard 
were Eniest H. Vogel, C. M. Wilson, 
Earle Poonnan and Lee Williams. 

* Recent meeting of the Asso- 
ciation of Radio Service Men, Roches- 
ter, N. Y., included novelty enter- 
tainment as well as the usual serious 
features. Friendly technical contest 
was held in which members first 
tried to identify and state the use 
of unlabeled circuits, then to draw 
schematics for each of 13 tubes for 
which type numbers were given. 

* Eugene F. Tracey, vice presi- 
dent, Zenith Radio Coi-))., Chicago, 
111., announced recently a very im- 
portant augmenting of the companj''s 
staff of district managers through- 
out the country. 

Six district managers were ap- 
pointed including some of the most 
popular and successful members of 
the radio industrj- in their respec- 
tive territories: James H. Hickey, 
formerly connected with the At- 
water-Kent Mfg. Co., who will rep- 
resent Zenith in Southeast territory; 
George A. Lyons, formerly sales pro- 
motion manager and district man- 
ager for Atwater-Kent, who will 
represent Zenith in New York state; 
R. E. McGreevy, formerly with the 
Modern Appliance .Sales Co., Zenith 
jobber in Columbus, O., to represent 
Zenith in Detroit territory; J. H. 
Soxither, formerly with Crosley, who 
will cover Kansas City, Mo. ; Fred 
H. Strayer, formerly with Hygrade 
Sylvania in executive sales posts, 
now to represent Zenith in Dallas, 
Tex. ; and C. H. Wilks, formerly with 
the Victor and Brunswick organiza- 
tions, to work in the Northwest. 
New managers spent several weeks 
in the Zenith factory in conference 
with Mr. Tracey and his associates, 
and with their previous experience 
as a background, they are well qur.I- 
ified to cooperate with Zenith job- 
bers and derlers to excellent ad- 
vantage in their respective territories. 



* Emporium, Pa., section of the 
Institute of Radio Engineers met Mar. 
11 to hear Dr. P. Robinson, of the 
Sprague Products Co., speak on 
"Electrolytic Capacitors and Their 
Application." Dr. Robinson has been 
associated with the development of 
these capacitors since their first use 
in radio receivers. 

*■ At a recent meeting of the 
Westchester Chapter of the Institute 
of Radio Seiwice Men, Inc., the fea- 
tured speaker was Vinton K. XJlrich, 

Technical Editor of RADIO TODAY. 
Subject was "Vacuum Tube Opera- 
tion as Applied to Radio Circuits." 
Mr. Ulrich also appeared at the Feb. 
8 meeting of the New York City 
IRSM chapter with a discussion of 
the sanie subject. 



2,199 

IDEAS 



THEY COME 

OUT here! 






THEY GO 
IN HERE ! 



¥0R YOUR 
\OWNSHOP! 



Out of this one big book you'll get over 2,000 ideas 
for building up your radio service and set business. 
Practical store-tested plans, methods, sales talks and ad 
specimens, whicli you can put to work TODAY. They'll 
make that old cash register sing sweet tunes! This 
great, new Ghirardi book will keep you out of the ruts 
and show you how to put your business on good solid 
ground. Tl HOW TO SELL — -Getting leads and prospects. 
Store phone and outside selling. Sales talks. Breaking 
do\ra sales resistance. TI HOW TO ADVERTISE — Plan- 
ning. Costs. How to write your own advertising. Tested 
appeals. Displays. Direct Mail. Newspaper and other 
forms of advertising. Free publicity. Merchandising. Con- 
tests. Follow-ups. H BUSINESS METHODS — How to start 
and run a business. Eciuipment and layout. Bookkeeping. 
Collections. Forms and records. Policies. 



^\^B 400 Pages 

^V£/2200 




March, 1937 



67 




That's only one of the advan- 
tages of the TUNG -SOL CON- 
SIGNMENT PLAN. No outlay for 
an adequate stock of these 
high quality tubes. No re- 
peated investments to keep 
that stock up to the minute. 
Sell— collect your prof it— then 
remit the cost price. That's 
"velvet" — for you! 

Tung -Sol performance 
means repeated, full - profit 
sales. There are still desirable 
locations for the appointment 
of reputable dealers.. who can 
qualify .Write for name of your 
nearest Tung-Sol wholesaler. 

TUNG-SOL 

TUNG-SOL LAMP WORKS, INC. 
Radio Tube Division 

Sales Offices: Atlanta, Boston, Charlotte, Chicago, Dallas, Detroit, 
Kansas City, Los Angeles, New York. General Office: Newark, NJ. 




new HIGH in 
Sensitivity and Value 

At 20 000 ohms per volt, this 
new Simpson Set Tester is 
the most remarkable value 
ever offered to the service 
man. Negligible current con- 
sumption means accurate D. C. voltage readings of 2.S — 10 — 50 — 
250—1000. Same ranges for A. C. at 1000 ohms per volt. Cur- 
rent readings from 1 microamp to 500 milliamps. Accurate 
resistance readings as low as I ohm up to 40 megohms. Ask for 
new circular covering wide range of tests. 

Model 250 (20,000 ohms per volt model)— Net Price. . $38i50 

Time price: $8.00 down and 6 monthly payments of $5.85 each 

Model 225 (10,000 ohms per volt model)— Net Price $29.50 

Time price: $6.00 down and 6 monthly payments of $4.50 each 

Illuminated Dial Tube Tester 

Checks all tubes under individual load 
conditions utilizing latest authoritative 
circuit. Tube quality shown on illu- 
minated scale. Separate scales for 
"Diodes" and 0-100 percentage scale 
for matching tubes. Spare sockets pro- 
vide for future tube changes. Has 
neon-tube short check. A beautiful in- 
strument that boosts tube sales. 
Model 222 Tube Tester — Counter or 
portable type — Net Price.. 

Time price: S8.00 down and 6 monthly payments of $6.20 eadl 




$39.50 




"Roto-Ranger" Tube and Set Tester 

"Roto-Ranger" feature places twelve 
distinct scales at finger tips. Utilizes 
latest tube testing circuit. Has filament 
return selector. Tests all types con- 
densers on separate scales. Has sepa- 
rate resistance scales of 100 ohms, 
100,000 ohms, 100 megohms. Three 
D. C. scales of 8—300— lOOO Volts. 
(2500 Ohms per Volt.) CR7 Afl 

Model 220— Net Price 99 IsUU 

Time Price: $11.40 down and 6 monthly payments of 58.75 each 

"Roto-Ranger" Volt-Ohm Milliammeter 

Incorporates Simpson "Roto-Ranger" fea- 
ture with twelve separate scales cover- 
ing all ranges for practical servicing. 
Model 201 with D. C. ranges only: Net 

Price $29.50 

Time Price: 56.00 down and 6 monthly 
payments of $4.50 each 

Model 202 (A. C.-D. C. type) : Net Price $32.50 

Time Price: $6.50 down and 6 monthly payments of $5.00 each 




SIMPSON 

RADIO INSTRUMENTS 
AND SERVICE EQUIPMENT 




COUPON BRINGS FACTS 



Simpson Electric Co., 5216 W. Kinzie St., Chicago 
Send bulletin describing models checked. 

n No. 250 n No. 225 D No. 222 Q No. 220 D No. 201 □ No. 202 

n Send deferred payment application. 



Name 

Address. 



68 



Radio Today 




Handier Than Ever 

ELECTROLYTICS 

*A'ow as handy mechanically as they 
have lon^ been electrically. Adjusti- 
niount flangres permit any mountiniar. 

• Instantly adjusted for any hole 
spacing^, flat or nprigrht luountins, 
singly or stacked. 

• These ultra-compact PBS cardboard- 
ease electrolyties come in 200 and 
toOT. ratingrs; popular capacities; single, 
double and triple sections. 

^%^nt€ ^°^ '^^^^^ catalog covering the largest line 
of condensers and essential resistors. 
Sample copy of monthly Research Worker included. 



EIWVM 



CORPORATION 



70 WcE^imgf on St 



BrooklYn. N. Y. 




ONE CUSTOMER 
TELLS ANOTHER 



The "good word" 
about Ken^Rad Tubes 
spreads, and you 
make more money. 
Take the first step to 
building better busi- 
ness by writing for 
our sales plan. 



m^. 



Manufacturers of a complete line 
of Standard Glass Types, G Series, 
and Genuine All-Metal Radio Tubes. 

Ken-Rad 

Radio Tubes 

KEN-RAD TUBE t LAMP CORPORATION, Inc., OwEnsbon,Kr. 



JOBBER NEWS 




FRANK HORNING, sales manager, 
new radio division of the now-exclu- 
sive Philadelphia jobber for GE, 
Elliott-Lewis Elec. Co. 

* Available to all distributors 
for Coi'iiell-Dubilier Corp. is the 6 th 

of a series of promotional displays. 
Latest counter-size placards are in 
three colors and are to be requested 
from the company at South Plain- 
field, N. J. 

* Recent guests at the Gmnow 
factories in Chicago were over 100 
dealers and salesmen from Midwest- 
Timmermaiin Co., Davenport and 
Dubuque, la. Group was thus hon- 
ored as a result of a sales contest. 
Next guest-group will arrive Mar. 
2 4th from Specialties Dist. Corp., De- 
troit. 





ALAN STEINERT, head man at the 

Eastern Co., recently-expanded RCA 

jobbers of Cambridge, Mass. 



P-A COI^TROL 

■A- Here's the new CLAROSTAT Series CIA 
Constant-Impedance Attenuator. Handles 25 
watts continuously, safely, at any setting. 

i^ Linear up to 45 db in steps of 3 db. In- 
finite attenuation at end position. Compen- 
sated ladder type network. Constant input 
and output impedances. 

ic 4^" long by S'.y dia. Single-hole mount- 
ing. Power switch for speaker field, optional. 
Just the thing for Public Address speakers. 

Send for DATA . . . 

Bulletin No, 11 describes this latest 
CLAkOSTAT product. Yours for the 
asking. And remember, there's a CLARO- 
STAT for every control and resistance need. 



Cl.AROSTAT 



<CLAI!OSKT> 



liEeor|M>r:il«-a] 

2U5 Xorlh Nixlli Kl. 

llrooklvn. X. ¥. 



Newest Radio Deve/o pMett ts 



MONTHS 
AHCAP/ 




iH ALUBD'S 

Write for the new Spring 
1937 ALLIED Radio Catalog 
— 156 pages packed with in- 
terest for every Dealer. Ser- 
viceman and Sound Specialist- 
Everything in Radio that's new. important — months 
ahead! More than 10,000 exact duplicate and replace- 
ment parts; 53 new Knight Radios, featuring latest 
console, auto, portable, plastic, and phono-radio com- 
bination models with Automatic Dialing, Touch-0- 
Matic Tuning, AFC. Tone Expansion, etc.; Public Ad- 
dress Systems; newest Test Instruments; latest Ama- 
teur Transmitting and Receiving gear; dozens of set- 
builders' kits; books, tools, etc. Send for this great 
book today! 




^ CATALOG 

You're always sure of huge 
stocks, fastest service and 
lowest prices when you order 
from the ALLIED Catalog! 



AUIEDIlAPIO^orp 



833 W. Jackson Blvd., Oept. 15-C 

I Chicago. III. I 

. Send me yiui new Siniiig 1937 .\LLIED Catalos;. * 

I Name I 

I .\ddress I 

I City State | 



March, 1937 



69 



Dual Universal 

WAVE-TRAP 

ELIMINATES: 
Blanketing by 
Poweiful, Nearby 
Broadcasting 
Stations. 
C Cross-modulation 

# Iiong-wave Signals 

• Code Interference 
d Broad Tuning 
9 I. F. Interference 

Dealers: 

You can boost your profits and 
save service calls by selling 
this unit with every set sale. 




Keep our dealer display card 
where your trade and salesmen 
cannot miss it. 



Sold By All Leading Jobbers 



MEISSNER MFG. CO. 

Mt Carmel Illinois 



"BULLET" 

DYNAMIC MICROPHONES 




EVERYBODY 
WANTS ONE . . . EVERYBODY 
CAN AFFORD ONE! 

The All-Purpose "Bullet" Dynamic Mi- 
crophone is sweeping the 1937 market. 

T.R. 3— New Model "Bullet". . . smaller 
than TR2 but with relatively the same char- 
acteristics. List price, any impedance. ..^24.50, 

T. R. 2 — Standard Model "Bullet". . . the 
ultimate in dynamic microphone performance. 
List price, any impedance . . . $39.50. 

Write for circular "T" and technical data 



TRANSDUCER CORPORATION 

30 Rockefeller Plaza 
New York, New York 



JOBBER NEWS 



•k Joseph OpiJenheim, a member 
of the Arm of the O. K. Appliance 
Co., Denver, Colo., successful jobber 
of Admiral sets and radio parts, is 
believed to have met an untimely 
death last month while skiing with 
a cousin also Identified with the job- 
bing organization. Both men have 
been lost in the mountains near 
Denver since Feb. 7th, and all hope 
has been given up of finding them 
before the spring thaw. 

* Fuller Specialty Co., Parkers- 
burg, W. Va., has added Clayton 
Shenvood to Its staff to direct sales 
on a new line of home and auto sets 
which the firm intends to distribute. 
Company is now distributing Na- 
tional Union tubes, all kinds of test- 
ing and sound eQuipment, general 
parts lines. Fuller's recently opened 
a new amateur department under the 
supervision of Charles liowers. 

•k Frank H. Clay Co., Kalamazoo, 
Mich., Crosley distributors for south- 
ern Michigan, recently were hosts to 
dealers and representatives of the 
Crosley Corp. at a lively display din- 
ner. Michigan dealers came from 
Battle Creek, Marshall, Berien 
Springs, Benton Harbor, Schoolcraft, 
Three Rivers, South Haven, Con- 
stantine, Galesburg, Coldwater, Ban- 
gor, Bloomingdale, Mendon, and 
Niles. 



* Newcomer to the radio and ap- 
pliance sales force of the Hardware 
& Supply Co., Akron, Ohio, is Jim 
Sturtevant, ace salesman. Company 
distributes Sparton sets and RCA 
tubes; according to one of its offi- 
cials, H. O. Smith, the firm will add 
two more salesmen if some real ones 
can be found. 




.sV^' 



HOWARD A. JACOBS, named by 
RCA jobbers, Bruno-New York, to 
sales-supervise Brooklyn and Lon^ 
Island. 

■*• Arthur Bennett has been added 
to the sales staff of the Ci-osley Dis- 
tributing Corp., Chicago. 

* Recent months found two 
Emerson displays in important spots. 
W. M. Dutton & Sons, Hastings, Neb., 
took an elaborate exhibit of Emer- 
son's full line to the Nebraska Re- 
tail Hardware Association conven- 
tion at Omaha; Morley Murphy Co., 
Milwaukee, Wis., were likewise ac- 
tive at the Wisconsin State conven- 
tion, Milwaukee. 

•k C K. Throckmorton, executive 
vice-president of RCA Mfg. Co., an- 
nounces the appointment of the 
Radio City Distributing Co., Dallas, 
Texas, as wholesale distributors of 
RCA Victor products in the Fort 
Worth-Dallas territory. The new 
company is headed by John Dono- 
van. Gay White, former RCA Victor 
sales representative in the Dallas 
district, will be in charge of sales. 




FLORIDA FIRM, Thurow Radio Distributors, alertly contact dealers in the 
Tampa territory with what looks like tops in travelling stock rooms. 



70 



Radio Today 




Push! 



Automatic Playing 
At Low Cost 

Increase your sales I Install General In- 
dustries modern record changing units in 
your radio-phonographs. Get them com- 
pletely assembled, ready to place in your 
cabinets with low installation cost . . . 
Silent, smooth-running, dependable two- 
speed FLYER Motor, including turntable. 
Instantly adjustable for 33^^ or 78 r.p.m. 
by simple shift lever. Maintains constant 
running speed as adjusted, regardless of 
%'ariations in record drag . . . Latest flat- 
type, flexible, balanced pickup . . . Accu- 
rate, reliable changer mechanism. All pre- 
cision-built throughout, insuring long active 
service free from repairs. Compact and 
efficient. For AC, DC, or universal AC-DC. 
Priced for changer combination sales in 
volume. 

Model "L", shown above, plays and 
changes EIGHT 10-in. or SEVEN 12-in. 
records. Model "K" plays and changes 
EIGHT 10-in. records; plays 12-in. records 
changed by hand . . . Order test samples 
TODAY. Be sure to specify exact voltage 
and frequency of current you use. 

■^Gememai Imdustkies €0. 

3738 TAYLOR STREET, ELYRIA, OHIO 

Send for FREE trial Package of TRUE- 
TONE Needles. 



TRIAD 



THE CHOICE 
OF SERVICEMEN 

BECAUSE 
THEY ARE USED 
BY LEADING SET 
IVTANUFACTURERS 



TRIAD 

MANUFACTURING 

COMPANY, Inc. 

Pawtucket, Rhode Island 

The Quality Name in RadioTubes 




THOMAS H. MAGINNISS, manager 
of the new Stewart-Warner Distribu- 
tors Co., Chicago. 

* At the Valley Radio Distiibii- 

tors, Appleton, Wis., three gentle- 
men have been added to the person- 
nel: R. R. Swanson, Lyall P. Biies- 
trin and Ralph L. Hamilton. Com- 
pany recently added new line o( 
Electrad volume controls. 

* Admiral radio sets will now be 
distributed exclusively in the metro- 
politan New York and northern New 
Jersey area by Dale Parts, Inc. This 
company is associated with Dale 
Radio Co., Inc., exclusive distributors 
of Sylvania tubes in the same terri- 
tory. Recently both Dale Parts and 
Dale Radio Co. moved to larger quar- 
ters at 2 5 Warren St., where a com- 
plete modern showroom has been 
provided for display and demonstra- 
tion. 





1937's 



MOST POPULAR 
AUTO SPEAKER 

The above model is a combination of our new 
automobile speaker cabinet and the model 6S2 — 
S" Nokoil speaker which requires no field current, 
thereby eliminating any drain on the battery. 

Those who know the quality of the Nokoil Repro- 
ducer can well imagine the performance the model 
S36 is capable of giving. 

The steel cabinet has a single stud attached to 
it, so that the cabinet carries the speaker. This 
does away with the old type method of drilling a 
hole in the pole piece of the speaker, making it 
carry the entire load, which often forces the pole 
piece off center. In the bottom of the cabinet, 
holes are provided so it may be base mounted when 
desired. 

LIST PRICE COMPLETE $0 M 

WITH SPEAKER ... O — 

Write for literature and prices on other models 
Also name of our nearest distributor. 

WRIGHT -DeCOSTER, INC. 

2265 University Avenue, St. Paul, Minnesota 
Export Dcpt. : M. Simons & Son Co., New York 

Cable Address: "Simontrice" 
Canadian Office: Wright-DeCoster. Inc., Guelph, Ont. 



TYPICAL WHEELED jobber, W. 
R. Osborne rolls around thru a 50- 
mile radius out of Croton-on-Hudson, 
N. Y. 



NOW you 

can afford a ^ 

Western Electric 

Mike ! 



It's both Non-Directional 
and Directional! 

Western Electric's newest mike — the 
633A— was designed by Bell Telephone 
Laboratories especially for public ad- 
dress and remote pick-up broadcasting. 
Like the famous 8-ball, it is a 2-in-l 
mike: (1) non- directional; (2) direc- 
tional, when acoustic baf&e is attached. 
It assures "good broadcast quality." 
Its low price will surprise you. 

GRAYBAR ELECTRIC CO., Graybar BIdg., New York. 

Please Bend bulletin describing the new Western 

Electric 633A microphone. RT-3-37 

iVame 

Address 

City State 



March, 1937 



71 



Ever Tear Open 

a 

'BARGAIN' 

CONDENSER 

to 

See What Makes 

It So Cheap?" 




■■DON'T BUY 

CONDENSERS 

BLINDFOLDED! 

■'Take an average or 'bar- 
gain' cardboard dry electrolytic 
for instance. Tear it apart. See if the 
niinals are embedded — see whether or 
not the unt is doubh-sealed in a moisture- 
proof container. See if ordinary wax instead 
of high quality heat-proof wax is used. Tear 
open defective condensers to learn exactly 
w-hy they failed. . . . 

"Nothing will prove more convincing in 
getting you to standardize on Spragues. as 
thousands of discriminating servicemen and 
amateurs have already done. Their solid, 
honest construction tells its ozun story of 
outstanding condenser quality I" 

SPRAGUE PRODUCTS CO., North Adams, Mass 



BATHING BEAUTY FOR DEALERS 

* Good-looking gal in a bathing 
suit, dra-«'n by the famed artist, Jay 
Weaver, looks out from the new dis- 
play piece issued by National Union 
Radio Corp. Background is a colorful 
presentation of the company's tube 
carton. 

Display is being supplied to dealers 
through NU distributors. 



NOISE STOPPER 

■*r Flashy display card for counter 
or window has been released by Tobe 
Deutschmann Corp., Canton, Mass., to 
plug a filterette which is designed to 
stop noise caused by electric razors. 
One of the fllterettes is attached to the 
card : attention is seized also by the 
word STOP in large type. Whole dis- 
play is about 5 by 7 in. 

RECORD FOR RADIO MEN 

■* Series of radio spot announce- 
ments for radio dealers to use on local 
stations between programs have been 
electrically transcribed and are being 
featured by RCA. Single disc has 13 
different announcements dramatized 
by professionals, and time is planned 
in each case to include dealer's name 
and address. 

Record is available through RCA 
Radiotron jobbers, gives small dealers 
a chance at professional scripting. 



"Sure!.. I've even 

TORN OPEN 

SPRAGUES 

to see what 

makes 'em 

SO GOOD!" 




"Look inside a 
Sprague dry electroly- 
tic such as the PTM-8 
'Pinhead' Tiny - Mike. Note 
that both terminals are deeply 
IMBEDDED IN HIGH MELTING _ 
POINT pitch. No chance for corrosion 
here! Note that an inside container is 
as a DOUBLE SEAL against moisture 
which so commonly increases leakage and 
lowers voltages with a consequent rise in 
heat in ordinary condensers. 

"In short, note that Sprague not only 
makes the finest, most reliable condensers, 
but also takes every precaution to keep them 
as fresh as the day they left the factory. 

"Yours for long, trouble-free condenser 
service." 

Sincerely, ^'t^**— 

/ Sale* Monoger, 

SPRAGUE PRODUCTS CO., North Adams, Mass. 




VITROHM LINE VOLTAGE REDUCER 

Protects the Set from Over Voltage 

The way line voltage is being stepped up it is no wonder that 
you are getting kicks because resistors, condensers and tubes 
are burning up. You can not only answer embarrassing ques- 
tions but can turn them into profit by offering the 
kicker this inexpensive unit that brings too high 
voltage down to safe limits. Write today for 
folder No. 1480 and prices. 

WARD LEONARD ELECTRIC CO. 

40 SOUTH STREET, MOUNT VERNON, N. Y. 




Please send me Folder No. 1480 



Name 
Street 
City... 
Jobber 

72 



State. 




TOVV* SIMPSON 

E MxKmKm instruments 

to 

National Union Servicemen 

By special arraiigeiiient. the Sinip.son 
line of tester-s is now obtainable 
FREE with .special deals on 

NATIONAL 
UNION TUBES 

— a complete line of 
hiffhcst quality tlil>es 
in f::lass, metal and G- 
type. Xote special of- 
fers at risrht (Kood 
only in the United 
States) . . . Coupon 
will brins further de- 
tails. Ask your .lobber 
for new booklet. '*Vour 
Pocket Book — What 
About It." 

National Union Radio Corp RT-337 
570 Lexington Ave., New York City 

Tell me how to set Simoson Testing 
Instruments and other FREE equip- 
ment. 

Name 

Address 

City State 




FREE 



New Simpson Set 
Tester No. 250 (20,- 
000 ohms per volt) 
with purchase of 
650 National Vnioii 
tubes over 2-year 
period and dealer 
deposit of $21.00 
for immediate de- 
livery of tester. This 
instrument would 
regularly cost you 
,$38.50. 



Other National 
Union Offers 

( On Tube Purchases 
Over 2- Year Period) : 

Simpson Set Tester 
No. 22.5 (10,000 ohms 
per volt) — with 500 
tubes; deposit ¥15.00. 
Simpson Roto-Ranger 
Tube Tester No. 220 
— with 950 tubes; de- 
posit S33.00. 

Simpson All - "Wave 
Signal Generator No. 
210 (AC) — with SOO 
tubes; deposit S2S.00. 

Simpson Roto-Ranger 
Volt - Ohm - Milliam - 
meter No. 201 — with 
500 tubes: deposit 
S15.00. 

Simpson Roto-Ranger 
Volt - Ohm - Milliam - 
meter No. 202 — with 
550 tubes: deposit 

isir.oo. 

Radio Today 




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Said CURRAN: "Eternal vigilance is the price 
of liberty" — which, if applied to the radio 
business, would mean that vigilance is the price 
of OPPORTUNITY. 

ONE EYE on the day's work— the other on 
tomorrow's opportunity. That is tire order 
of the day, for radio has COME BACK and is 
REACHING OUT. 

Not in eight or nine years has there been such def- 
inite promise of opportunity— in old lines and ne\v. 

Have YOU watched this trend as closely as you 
should? Have you noticed how the pages of RADIO 
TODAY bring you the first word of new oppor- 
tunities in merchandise and methods? Do you 
realize the significance of ^s'hat is taking place in 
the field of auto radio, sound and communication 



Said SHAKESPEIARE : "Some must watch while 
some must sleep," but. of course, this won't go 
in radio. The watching is necessary but you 
mustn't be caught napping. 

systems, records and recording and other activities 
now confronting alert radio men? 

If you want to know the real meaning of what is 
going on in radio and its allied fields — if you want 
to keep abreast of things and be at the door when 
opportimity knocks, you must read RADIO 
TODAY regularly. 

And here is anotlier opportunity: With a one-year 
subscription to RADIO TODAY at ONE DOL- 
LAR, you will receive, absolutely free, the 1937- 
1938 edition of the Radio Service Year Book, a 
valuable and useful compilation of data needed by 
every man in radio. 



FEATURES of the YEAR BOOK 

Annual Radio Trade Directory, the only work of its kind 

in the industry. 
Tables of Intermediate Frequency Peaks, necessary for 

alignment and helpful in ordering replacement units. 
RMA Color Coding Data, showing at a glance whether or 

not a set is color-marked to indicate the necessary values 

of resistance, etc. 
ALSO, Tube Operating Voltages, Analysis of Sockets, 

Comparison of Tube Types and other classes of data 

of daily importance to all radio men. 



FREE! 

To get this Year Book FREE with a one-year, one-dollar, 
subscription to RADIO TODAY, just fill out and mail the 
card herewith. You subscription will start at once. The 
Year Book is now in production. It will be sent to you as 
soon as it is off the press. 



RADIO TODAY 

Published by CALD WELL-CLEMENTS, Inc. 
480 Lexington Ave., New York, N. Y. 



MAIL the CARD TODAY 




March, 1937 



73 




ON DISTRIBUTORS 



Complete 
Electric Plants 



ONAN ALTERNATING CURRENT 
GENERATING PLANTS furnish the 
same electricity as city power lines. Made 
in sizes 350 to 10,000 watts to meet the re- 
quirements of those who must provide their 
own electricity for Farms, Summer Camps, 
Cottages, Boats, Commercial Purposes, 

OPERATE A. C. RADIO 
These A. C. Plants operate RADIO, 
HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES, WATER 
PUMP, MOTORS — anything that nor- 
mally would operate from city lines. Will 
run Public Address Systems, Demonstrating 
Car Equipment, Talking Moving Pictures, 
X-Ray. 

MODERN CONSTRUCTION 
ONAN PLANT Engines are like the Motor 
Car, Truck or Tractor Engines. Operate 
on Gasoline, Gas or Distillate. Wiring and 
Installation is the same as for standard ap- 
plications. Also 32 volt. Direct Current 
Models. Write for Details 

D. W. ONAN & SONS 

571 Royatston Ave. Minneapolis, Minn. 




THIS 

FREE 

160 
PAGE 

RADOLEK PROFIT GUJDE 

New 1937 Edition. Just off the press ... the 
most complete Radio Parts Catalog ever published 
. . . completely revised, bigger and better. Every- 
thing in radio ... at the right prices. Over 160 
pages of valuable, money-saving "radio-buying" in- 
formation. Over 12,000 Radio Repair Parts — hun- 
dreds of new items — a complete, new selection of 
Radio Receivers and Sound Amplifiers . . . contains 
the most complete, exact duplicate replacement parts 
listings, of volume controls, condensers, transformers, 
vibrators. Every page of this New Radio Supply 

Catalog brings you extra profits. This is your book 

it's FREE. Send for your copy NOW 



R A D O L E 


K 


601 W. Randolph. Chicago, Dept. D-5. 
Send me the Radolek Radio Profit Guide 
Name 


FREE 


Address 



Serviceman? □ Dealer? □ 




RADIO SPECIALTY is the name of the Milwaukee firm to which Alvin Van 
Antwerpen and Vernon Maurer belong, but they accent Norge as well as Philco. 



♦ Elaborate series of dealer 
meetings have been held by these 
PhUco distributors: Commonwealth 
Sales Corp., Richmond, Va.; A. K. 
Sutton, Charlotte, N. C; D. & H 
Distributing Co., Inc., Harrisburg, 
Pa.; Auto Parts Co., Williamsport, 
Pa. ; Eshelman Supply Co., Lan- 
caster, Pa.; and Radio & Motor Ser- 
vice, Inc., Altoona, Pa. 



* Dealers in the areas around 
Philadelphia, Atlantic City, and Wil- 
mington, Del., have been notified by 
GE that dual distribution in the ter- 
ritory has been stopped; the Elliott- 
Lewis Electrical Co., 1017 Race St.. 
Philadelphia, now has full respon- 
sibility. GE wants it made clear that 
the step was taken without reflection 
upon anyone, and that the only aim 
is better merchandising service. 



* At Houston, Tex., Reader's 
Wholesale Distributors held recently 
a special dealer party to present the 
1937 Croslej' products. Hymen 
Reader, president, reports an un- 
usually lively meeting for the nearly 
500 guests; party had cocktails, ban- 
quet, floor show, dancing. 



* Company formerly known as 
the Dakota Radio Service Co., Yank- 
ton, S. D., has recently been incor- 
porated under the name of Dakota 
Radio Corp. Firm distributes Wil- 
cox-Gay and Setchell Carlson sets, 
and considers taking on a line of re- 
frigerators and other appliances, as 
well as a nationally advertised line 
of radio sets. R. A. Bowyer, Jr., 
is president; M. J. Kramar, v-pres.; 
G. H. Ellerman, secretary and treas- 
urer. 



•k Wholesale Radio Service Co., 

100 Sixth Ave., New York, have 
opened a new display and sales room 
at 90-08 166th St. (Merrick Road), 
Jamaica, L. I., New York. Expan- 
sion was made as a convenience to 
servicemen, amateurs and experi- 
menters living in the Queens and 
Long Island districts. 

*• Newcomer to the sales staff of 
OK Appliance Corp., Admiral distrib- 
utors of Denver, Colo., is Grosvenor 
S. Barron, who will travel for the 
firm in its southern and western ter- 
ritories. OK Corp. covers the Rocky 
Mountain area and reports that there 
are some cities and towns available 
for exclusive franchises on Admiral. 

* In the midst of one of the 
worst rains in the history of Nor- 
folk, Va., Tidewater Electric Corp., 
Philco jobbers, report a 100 per cent 
turn-out among dealers recently 
when it held an Automatic Tuning 
Cabaret Party. Howard P. Stewart, 
Tidewater secretary, was in charge; 
E. Jack Guillory, Philco district rep- 
resentative, was a guest. 

TUBE DJSPLAY SERVICE 

* Feature window display series 
has been prepared by RCA Radiotron. 
Service consists of 4 main display 
units, to be followed by supplementary 
material supplied at intervals. 

First unit features the Radiotron 
doll, the second is a large reproduc- 
tion of a slate to be used for daily 
bulletins, the third is a life-sized girl 
standing beside the world's largest 
radio tube, and the fourth accents the 
football angle. Additional material is 
seasonal and includes streamers, 
charts, pictorial news bulletins, etc. 



74 



Radio Today 



• INDEX • 
TO ADVERTISEMENTS 



pajc 

AEROVOX CORP 69 

ALLIED RADIO CORP 69 

AMERICAN CARRIER-CALL CORP 33 

AMPERITE CO 42.62 

ARCTURUS RADIO TUBE CO 60 

ASTATIC MICROPHONE LABORATORY 27 

ATLAS SOUND CORP 42 

BRIGGS & STRATTON CORP 1 

BRUSH DEVELOPMENT CO 46 

CENTRALAB 49 

CLAROSTAT MFG. CO.. INC 69 

COMMERCIAL CREDIT CORP 57 

CONTINENTAL CARBON. INC 60 

CONTINENTAL RADIO & TELEVISION CORP. 21 

CORNELL-DUBILIER CORP 43 

CROSLEY RADIO CORP 54.55 

CROWE NAME PLATE & MFG. CO 64 

DICTOGRAPH PRODUCTS CO.. INC 2.3 

ELECTRO-ACOUSTIC PROD. CO.. 

Subsid. Magnavox Co 27 

FAIRBANKS. MORSE & CO 53 

FREED MFG. CO.. INC 22 

FRIGIDAIRE DIV., GENERAL MOTORS 51 

GALVIN MFG. CORP Cover IV. 

GENERAL ELECTRIC CO Cover III. 

GENERAL INDUSTRIES CO.. THE 71 

HYGRADE SYLVANIA CORP 47 

J. F. D. MFG. CO 64 

KATO ENGINEERING CO 63 

KEN-RAD TUBE & LAMP CORP.. INC 69 

LEHMAN RADIO SALON. INC 60 

MEISSNER MFG. CO 70 

MILES REPRODUCER CO.. INC 76 

MILLION RADIO & TELEVISION LABS 49 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING CO Cover II. 

NATIONAL UNION RADIO CORP 27, 72 

NOBLITT-SPARKS INDUSTRIES. INC 2S 

OMAN & SONS. D. W 74 

OPERADIO MFG. CO 34 

PARRIS-DUNN CORP 62,63 

PHILCO RADIO & TELEVISION CORP 6 

PLEASANTAIRE CORP 5 

PIONEER GEN-E-MOTOR CORP 22 

PRESTO RECORDING CORP 56 

RADIO & TECHNICAL PUBL. CO 67 

RADIO CORP. OF AMERICA 38.39 

RADIO RECEPTOR CO., INC 48 

RADOLEK 74 

RAYTHEON PRODUCTION CORP 25 

RCA MFG. CO.. COMMERCIAL SOUND 43 

RCA MFG. CO. RCA-VICTOR DIV 4 

RIDER. JOHN F 22 

SHURE BROS 58 

SIMPSON ELECTRIC CO 68 

SOLAR MFG. CORP 75 

SPRAGUE PRODUCTS CO 72 

STANDARD TRANSFORMER CORP 41 

TRANSDUCER CORP 70 

TRIAD MFG. CO., INC 71 

TRIPLETT ELECTRICAL INSTRUMENT CO.. 61 

TRIUMPH MFG. CO 59 

TUNG-SOL LAMP WORKS. INC 68 

UNITED SCIENTIFIC LABS.. INC 40 

UNIVERSAL CONTROLS, INC 76 

UTAH RADIO PRODUCTS CO 66 

WARD & CO.. MONTGOMERY 48 

WARD LEONARD ELECTRIC CO 72 

WARD PRODUCTS CORP 49 

WEBSTER-CHICAGO 31 

WEBSTER ELECTRIC CO 37 

WESTERN ELECTRIC CO 71 

WESTON ELECTRICAL INSTRUMENT CO... 45 

WHITE DENTAL MFG. CO.. S. S 65 

WHOLESALE RADIO SERVICE CO 56 

WRIGHT-DeCOSTER. INC 71 

While every precaution is taken to insure accu- 
racy, we cannot guarantee against tiie possibility 
of an occasional change or omission in the prepara- 
tion of this index. 




^(f^^ 




March, 1937 



75 




Universal 

FEATURES 



• No assem- 
bly. No Icose 
parts. 

• No cutting 
of dash. No 
visible screws. 

• Escutcheon 
Plates to match 
all instrument 
panels. Color- 
matched knobs. 

• Automatic 
dial adjust- 
ment. 

• Minimum 
stock for maxi- 
mum coverage. 



Pre- 

ASSEMBLED 

REMOTE CONTROLS 
for all 1937-36-35 CARS 
and ALL CAR RADIOS 

You'll do a better \ob— quicker 
-v^ith UNIVERSALS. Pre-asscm- 
bled at our plant, they come to 
you already to slip into the dash- 
board opening, perfectly matched 
in design and finish. Less inventory 
-^more profits on re*installat(ons. 

DISTRIBUTORS: 
A request will bring 
our representative with 
the complete story. 



iUuomoL 

conTROLS. inc. 

S1-07 40lh Ave., L. I. Cily, N. y., Dspl. C 



[ 



Please send without obligation your 
Bulletin 37.C2 about the new, pat- 
ented Universal Controls. 

Name 

Address 





VOCAPHONE 

Communication Systems 

"MILES AHEAD OF OTHERS" 

OUR slogan, always true of sound 
equipment, is especially true of 
communication systems. V O C A - 
PHONE is a master unit connected 
with from one to six sub-stations. It 
meets every requirement of Simplicity, 
Sensitivity, Tonal quality, Volume, Flex- 
ibility and Low cost. 
Whether you need one or six sub-sta- 
tions, the VOCAPHONE is packaged 
merchandiise and is sold complete. No 
wiring. No installation experience is 
necessary. Move it at will. Operates 
on AC or DC. For complete details of 
the system and its market, write 

MILES REPRODUCER CO., INC. 

Manufacturers of 

Sound and Communication Systems 

112-14 West 14th St., New York, N. Y. 



TRADE FLASHES 



* Frank T. Parker, manager of 
the Portland, Ore., branch of the 
F. B. Connelly Co., Gnmow distribu- 
tors, has announced that a series of 
dealer meetings will be held in key 
cities of the northwest. Connelly 
firm recently held a special meeting 
for jobber salesmen and branch man- 
agers of the company's 3 branches, 
Seattle, Portland and Spokane. 

* Philco has named the Philco 
Iowa Sales Co. as distributor for 
47 counties in the Des Moines area, 
where the company has its establish- 
ment. Loll Cohen is sales manager 
of the new organization. 

*• Kierulff & Co., well known 
jobbing organization in Los Angeles, 
Cal., distributing Admiral sets, has 
opened a br?noh in Phoenix, Ariz. 
J. A. Clippinger, vice-president of 
Admiral, was among those at the 
opening. 

* Association of Radio Sei'\ire 
Engineers, Buffalo, N. Y., recently 
elected the following officers: T. J. 
Telask, president; J. E. Stoffel, vice- 
pres.; A. J. Schreiber, executive sec- 
retary; F. Bestine, corresponding 
secretary; V. E. Ball, treasurer; .John 
Klemens, sgt.-at-arms; H. Keller, 
librarian. Office of the executive 
secretary is at 33 Grote St., Buffalo. 

* Expansion plans at the RCA 
New York jobber firm, Bi-uiio-Xew 
York, Inc., include several changes 
and additions to the sales staff: 
Howard A. .Jacobs has been named 
sales supervisor for Brooklyn and 
Long Island; Anthony J. Dillon is the 
new supervisor for Manhattan, 
Bronx and Westchester; Chris Llnds- 
ley, Aaron Welskott and W. H. Pin- 
ciis have been appointed sales repre- 
sentatives. 

•k Tremont Electrical Supply Co., 

Inc., otherwise known as "Ben's 
Radio" have moved to a new loca- 
tion at 372 Tremont St., Boston, 
Mass., where they are offering com- 
plete lines of radio, amateur and 
transmitting apparatus. 

* Fairbanks, Morse & Co. has 

announced the appointment of these 
distributors: B. W. Smith Co.. Cleve- 
land; Waldins, Kinnan & Mai-viiig 
Co., Toledo, Ohio; Klaus Radio & 
Elec. Co., Peoria, 111.; WTiitney 
Sporting Goods Co., Denver, Colo.; 
liorenz Co., Klamath Falls, Ore. ; 
Koeneman Elec. Co., Jackson, Miss. 
According to W. Paul Jones, FM gen- 
eral manager, the appointments are 
a part of a definite plan to extend 
merchandising plans for 193 7. 

* Ij. a. Levi is now the sales 
manager at R. F. Bums Radio Co., 

Johnstown, Pa., distributors. Also 
new at the company is George Cor- 
net, service engineer, assisted by 
Heni-y Bowden. Burns distributes 
Delco sets and Hygrade Sylvania 
tubes. 




PRESIDENT Ira J. Owen of Utah, 
foreseeing business increases for 1937- 
8, is starting a big expansion program. 



* Starr Piano Co., Richmond, 
Ind., which makes Gannett records 
for use as sound effects, has a new 
sound truck operating for its Pacific 
Coast division. This traveling re- 
cording outfit goes anywhere and re- 
cords everyday sounds in the coun- 
try, city, mountains, seashore, desert. 
Truck is equipped with Universal 
Microphone Co.'s professional re- 
cording gadgets, specially mounted 
for mobile operation. 



LIGHT— RADIO— REFRESHMENTS 




International Kadette's new easy- 
chair model with "Equafonic" horizon- 
tal speaker, handy tuning and space 
for cocktail service. 



76 



Index to advertisements on page 75 



Radio Today 



Watc 





FITS Roll In 



ITH G-E AUTO RADIO 



Today, only 4 out of every 23 automobiles on the road are 
equipped ■with auto radio — 19 million cars •without auto radio. 
What a market] No wonder auto radio dealers are enthusiastic 
about this year's unequaled opportunity to win new sales and 
increased profits. 

Once Again General Electric leads the auto radio parade. 

This time with the most complete auto radio program in G-E 
Auto Radio history. It puts G-E Radio dealers on the fast lone 
to auto radio sales and profits. 

Only GENERAL ELECTRIC OFFERS 

YOU ALL THESE SALES-MAKING ADVANTAGES 

The ONLY Auto Radio with Automatic Frequency Control — -a real 
contribution to simplified tuning and safe driving. 

A complete Auto Radio line in 3 new models — each a sales 
leader in its price bracket. 

Dominating Performance .... Metal Tubes .... Greater Power. 

"Custom -Built" Instrument Panel Controls for all makes of cars. 



Complete line of Auto Antennas ~ a new source of business and 
profits. 

Powerful Soles Promotion Helps. 

Demonstration Stand . . . Folders . . . Wall Charts . . . Banners . . . 
Handbills . . . Auto Door-Handle Hangers! Everything you need for 
EASY STARTING and a quick GETAWAY to volume sales. 

Ask your G-E Radio Distributor — or return the coupon — for full 
particulars about General Electric MERCHANDISING DEAL. It 
contains FOUR of the new G-E Auto Radio MODELS plus a 
complete SALES PROMOTION SERVICE. Get set for a record 
run in sales and profits in General Electric's greatest Auto 
Radio year. 

GENERAL^ ELECTRIC 



y^uZ^^^a&f 



Section R-463 

General Electric Company. 

Radio Division, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Please send me complete information about 
the G-E AUTO RADIO 1937 Merchandising Deal. 

Name 

Firm _ 

Address _ 

CitY State 



APPLIANCE AND MERCHANDISE DEPARTMENT. GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY. BRIDGEPORT, CONNECTICUT 




THE 



ACaUSTINATDR 



IS BRINGING FLOCKS OF CAR OWNERS IN TO BUY/ 







The NEW ''PERSONAL PREFERENCE SELECTOR" IS 

TODAY'S BIGGEST AUTO RADIO FEATURE 



MODEL "35" 
THE CHALLENGER 

NEW LOW PRICE-BIG VALUE 

6Tubes - S-GangTuningCondenser 

List, $29.95 




Never before has there been such a wave of enthus- 
iasm among car radio buyers. Motorists itch to get their 
fingers on the knobs and direct their own radio programs. This 
"stand-out" ACOUSTINATOR feature permits car owners 
to emphasize at will either the Music, Voice or Bass of the 
programs they listen to. And they can accommodate Motorola 
to their location — whether in the Country, City or alongside 
Street Cars, insuring extreme useable sensitivity without 
noise, crashes and crackles. CASH IN NOW ON MOTOROLA! 






"GOLDEN VOICE" 
MOTOROLA 

The Aristocrat of Radio 

8 Tubes 




EXACTLY MATCHES 
DASH OF ALL CARS 



NEW "E-Z" CONTROLS 



■ADAPTO" BROAD 
RANGE ANTENNA SYSTEM 



REVERSIBLE-PHASE 
MAGIC ELIMINODE" 







ACOUSTINATOR 

Personal Preference Selector 



LOW BATTERY DRAIN 



PERMANENT MAGNET 
DYNAMIC SPEAKERS 



ORTHO-ACOUSTIC 
SEPARATE SPEAKERS 




LOW BATTERY DRAIN 

Batterv Drain has been reduced as much 
as 25% in some models . . . Added Effi- 
ciency . . . New Economy of Operation. 




8" Permanent Magnet Dynamic Speaker 

LOW BATTERY DRAIN 

ACOUSTINATOR EQUIPPED 

List, $69.50 



odel "65" ACOUSTINATOR EQUIPPED 

LOW BATTERY DRAIN 
6 Tubes — 8" Electro Dynamic Speaker 

List, S49.95 



Model "45" REMARKABLE PERFORMANCE 

6 Tubes — 6" Electro Dynamic Speaker 

Local-Distance Switcfi and Tone Control 

List, S39.95 



8" Permanent Magnet Dynamic Speaker 

LOW BATTERY DRAIN 

ACOUSTINATOR EQUIPPED 

List, $54.95 



NEW-DIFFERENT-BETTER 

Product o£ the same engineering staff that has kept 
Motorola Car Radio far ahead in PERFORMANCE 
and VALUE for seven years. 

READY IN M AY 



Motorola is backed by 1937's most outstanding Merchandising and 
Advertising Program, designed to make your selling easier ^nd your 
profits greater. Tie in with Motorola for your biggest auto radio year. 



GALVIN MFG. CORPORATION 

847 WEST HARRISON STREET, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 







▲ 




APRIIP 



Match the Mood 

of ^ur Prospects 




there's an NBC program 
to do it 

THAT'S what the wise radio dealer does 
today. He doesn't tune in a Swing 
Band for the old folks, or give the young 
ones Household Hints. He finds out, in 
the course of the conversation, how tastes 
run in both sets and programs. Then he 
safeguards the sale by dialing an NBC 
Station and Program— one which matches 
the mood! It's an invaluable aid in sell- 
ing the better sets. 

Knota your NBC Stations and Programs— 
what they are. . .when they go on. They're 
your yardstick of program quality. To tune 
them in, swiftly and accurately, is to give 
your demonstration every possible break! 

RCA presents "The Magic Key" 

every Sunday 2 to ^ P. M., E. S. T. 

on NBC Blue Network. 

National 

Broadcasting 

Company 

A Radio Corporation of America Service 



U^M 




ru^f^ 



CUnotv v/ ^^ g^er, » receivers at« ^^tis- 

brUUa«t^y *^^^ ^,^^rion ^**'° ,.,,, constant an 

.-hat tV^^V caption at the tn - ^^ ^,,,ion neve ^^_^ 

^'"1 ^^°^^^"' seen to that, so- . . 

Hundreds °^ ^^^^^ uave see . . ^ 

announce .^=^^^ „ . ,^V Rl 






' ^"^ foduct vviU b-^;;„^sinfe the very .^.yUnfe-" 

""^rmake it. , design-^ -^ ^^^ected fran 






UNDIS 




■■^ft 



RCA RADIOTRONS 

THE CHOICE OF MILLIONS 
OF SET OWNERS 



aeiC^ laatrio Mtm 

RCA Manufacturing Company, Inc. • Camden, New Jersey 
A Service of the Radio Corporation of America 



RCA "CHECK-UP" 

THE CHOICE OF THOU- 
SANDS OF SERVICE MEN 



To the consumer, RCA Radiotrons mean high quality... To the radio man, RCA Radiotrons mean easier selling, higher profits 



DEALERS GET WAY TO FIND PROSPECTS 
...MAKE THEM PAY TO BE DISCOVERED 



Spring '^ Check -Up^^ a Proved Way to Profits 
. . . Pays You for Building New Sales ! 



RCA Radiotron jobbers now offer 
a vastly improved profit-making 
plan based on three years of 
successful operation. 

The RCA Radiotron Spring Check-Up Plan 
is a sound, complete ten-point radio check- 
up service for which you charge your 
customer $1.50, exclusive of parts ... A 
complete merchandising package wrapped 
up for immediate use. 

What It Does 
This sensational Plan gives you entry into 
73% of the homes in your community, be- 
cause that many homes have a radio. Visits 
to sick radios open the door to the sale of 
more than tubes. Dealers and service men 
find check-up also promotes sales of service 
and parts— sells new sets and appliances. 

Why It Works 

58 out of every 100 sets in your community 
need service, repairs, new tubes. If you 
let them, set owners will wait until their 
radios break down completely before get- 
ting service. You can stir them into action 
with this Check-Up Plan because check- 
ups are a part of American life. People 
are accustomed to automobile, health and 
dental check-ups. Hence, they see the wis- 
dom of a radio check-up. 

You visit customers on the basis of "ser- 
vice"— not "sales". You get paid in full 
for the service you render. In addition, you 
collect for parts, tubes, and whatever else 
you sell— and every home offers you an 
opportunity for profitable sales! In this 
way, the RCA Check-Up Plan actually 
makes prospects joaj/ for being discovered! 

HOW THE CHECK-UP IS 
PROMOTED TO CONSUMER 

RCA Radiotron, the only tube manufac- 
turer today doing any national consumer 
advertising for its dealers, breaks with a 
tremendous campaign in April, featuring 
One column ads in Saturday Evening 
Post and Collier's every other week. 
Newspaper ads in over 100 cities. 
Strong commercial announcements on 
a full-hour nation-wide broadcast 
every Sunday. 
Ask your distributor how you can cash in 
on this outstanding advertising program. 



POWERFUL SALES HELPS 
OFFERED BY RADIOTRON 

Radiotron jobbers are now in a position to 
supply service men and dealers new and 
potent sales aids to help them cash in on the 
Spring Check-Up. Ask your jobber how. 
1 You can have your name listed in local 
newspapet ads. 2 Newspaper mats for 
your own use can be secured. 3 New mail- 
ing pieces, handouts and various pieces of 
literature can be had on a cooperative basis. 

MAKE YOUR WINDOW A 
PROFIT PULLER 




Here is the second display in the '37 Radio- 
tron Display Service. The slate with chalk 
and eraser comes with two giant cartons, 
measuring 6" x 6" x 18" and 30 dummy 
cartons. A real talking display that will 
help you sell Check-Up. 

Ask your RCA Tube distributor how 
you can get this complete year's service. 



NEW! 

Auto Radio Check-Up Opens New Field 
for Sale of Service, Tubes and Parts 

1,412,000 auto radios were sold last 
year. This year it is estimated there 
will be 1,750,000 more sold. Car deal- 
ers aren't prepared to service them. 
You are ! These radios need attention 
more often than home sets — and the 
RCA Auto Radio Check-Up Plan gives 
you a great opportunity to cash in on 
extra business. Get full details from 
your RCA Tube distributor. 



*Average cost of advertising 
Average net profit— 16% 



DEALERS MAKE 16% NET PROFIT 
USING RCA CHECK-UP PLAN 

Below is shown results obtained by over 
1,000 neighborhood dealers, radio service 
men and department stores from mailing 
500 to 1,000 letters in connection with the 
RCA Radiotron Check-Up, to prospects 
and customers over a period of one month 
to three months. They averaged 38 calls 
per 1, 000 mailings. Based on this average, 
the dollar returns per dealer are : 

35Check-Upsat$1.50each . .$52.50 
Sale of tubes, parts for replace- 
ments were $3.65 per Check-Up . 127.75 

r. , , .. $180.25 

Uealers operating 

cost based on the above dollar volume 

Cost of tubes sold $ 39.01 

Cost of parts and accessories . . 21.10 

Cost of labor 38.00 

'""^1" ) 36.00 
$134.11 
$ 17.00 
$ 29.14 

The profit shown above, of course, was in 
addition to the money made by dealers in 
the regular course of business. Many deal- 
ers have reported sales of new radios and 
other electrical appliances ranging from $3 
to well over $700— all plus value and profit. 
Thousands of dealers are averaging from 
3% to 16?5 returns— from 30 to 160 radio check- 
up jobs per thousand letters sent to radio 
set owners, at an average of $5 per job. 



"■nnBtlions fower 

S "^hetk aeriol, .„„„ . 

6 Align antenno d., 
* Check causes »f 



RADIO TODAY, April, 1937, Vol. Ill, No. 4, published monthly by Ca Idwell-Clements, Inc.. 480 Le.xington Ave., New York, N. Y. Subscription 
yearly $.100 in U. S. and Latin American countries; $1.25 in Canada; $2.0 all other countries; single copy, 15c. Entered as second-class matter July 
24, 1936, at the post office at New York, N. Y., under the Act of March 3, 1879. Printed in U. S. A. Copyright 1937 by Caldwell-Clements, Inc. 



Did You Ask for INNOVATIONS ? . . .Then Look to 



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(Slightly Higher in 
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Emerson "Silent Salesman" 

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Put it to work. It's the most dynamic 
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The COMPLETE Emerson line con- 
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$7995 



(Slightly Higher in West 
and South) 




EMERSON RADIO AND PHONOGRAPH CORPORATION .111 Eighth Avenue, New York, N. Y. 

World's Largest Makers of Small Radios 



April, 1937 



THE RADIO STATIONS OF TH 




SHOWING JUST A FEW OF 



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Radio Today 




BUSINESS REPLY CARD 

First Class Permit No. 22273 (Sec. SIO P. L. & R.) New York, N. Y 



RADIO TODAY 



480 LEXINGTON AVENUE 

NEW YORK, N. y, 




Send me RADIO TODAY for the period indicated below: 

Q 1 Year (12 issues) $1.00 Q Send bill 

Q 3 Years (36 issues) $2.00 []]] Amount enclosed 

Name Title or Oceupafioo _ 

Company . 

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City State 



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If RADIO TODAY is to be mailed to yonr heme, fill in address here 



B0i 



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FROM THE RADIO BUSINESS THIS SUMMER 

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April, 1937 




ili^i; 



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Every business that uses more than one room 
is a PHILCO PHONE prospect! As a matter 
of fact, Phiico dealers are finding the smaller 
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a telephone switchboard and operator ... are 
just about the easiest ones to interest in the 
time-saving, step-saving features of PHILCO 
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PHILCO RADIO & TELEVISION CORPORATION 



Radio Today 



"" ^^ IJJf 



©CIB 337826 

Staff— 

Darrell Bartee 
Randall R. Irwin 
M. H. Newton 
B. V. Spinetta 
Vinton K. Ulrich 



Lee Robinson 

Sales Manaaer 



RADIO 
TODAY 



Orestes H. Caldwell 
Editar 

JI. Clements/ 
Publisher J 

CopyriKht 1937 . 

Caldwell-Clements. Inc. • 

480 Lexington Ave. 

New York, N. Y, 

Tel. PLaza 3-1340 



Vol. Ill, No. 4 



RADIO PRICES GOING UP 

*■ Survey of radio industry shows 
that current rises in raw materials, 
parts, and labor costs will soon be felt 
in radio-receiver prices. A boost of 
10 to 15 per cent is looked for when 
the new lines are announced in May 
or June with perhaps more increases 
later. 

Facing- labor difficulties, some set- 
makers have been cautious in fixing 
new prices too early. Factories which 
have not yet been forced into union 
contracts are holding back announce- 
ments until they learn what uppance 
may be needed to meet new costs. 

If coming price increases do not 
exceed 10 to 12 per cent, distributors 
and dealers feel that boost will not 
seriously affect consumer buying, 
since radio purchases are made at 
long intervals by any one family or 
buyer, and price memory does not 
linger. 



"SPRING CLEAN-UP" TIME 

* This is the season when thou- 
sands of radio listeners begin to suf- 
fer annoyance from blown-down an- 
tennas, corroded contacts, and worn 
out tubes. 

Earlier in the year, when reception 
was at its peak, these troubles were 
not so noticeable. But with the de- 
parture of cold weather, reception gets 
weaker, and then the faults in the lis- 
tener's installation which have been 
accumulating all winter begin to show 
up as interference with the programs. 

Accordingly Radio Today is ini- 
tiating a "Spring Clean-Up'" cam- 
paign to be taken part in by all radio 
dealers and distributors, and is fur- 
ther co-operating by arranging for 
broadcast periods to tell the listener 
how to "eliminate present troubles by 
calling in a qualified radio man." 

A chart of suggestions for the radio 
dealer and serviceman appears on a 
following page. The first of the broad- 
easts is scheduled for 7 P.M. E.S.T., 
Friday, April 23, over WJZ and Blue 
network, ^STBC. 



BIGGEST AUTO-RADIO YEAR 

* Unless sit-downs and lock-outs 
further hold up automobile produc- 
tion, 1937 is going to be auto-radio's 
biggest year, by far. 

Plans of the car-makers contem- 
plate a 30 per cent increase in num- 
ber of car-radios installed this season 
as compared with last year, when 
auto-radio sales were 2,000,000 sets, 
according to observers in a position 
to review all makes. 

At least one million auto-radio sets 
will be sold through local retail deal- 
ers during 1937, according to this 
same authority. 

8,248,755 RADIOS IN 1936 

* Complete fig'ures reporting all 
radio sets built by licensed radio 
manufacturers in 1936, are now avail- 
able for all four quarters of the year, 
and reveal that radio-set sales for the 
twelve months officially passed eight 
million receivers. This total is, of 
course, an all-time high — in number 
of sets — far exceeding the banner year 
of 1929, when production was 4,400,- 
000 sets, with a retail value of 



$600,000,000. In comparison, 1936 
retail value was probably about $450,- 
000,000 

1935 Sets 

1st quarter 1.155.43S 

2nd quarter 1,074.909 

3rd quarter 1.528.684 

4th quarter 2,267,000 



1st 
2nd 
3rd 
4th 



Total 6,026.031 

1936 

quarter 1,287.462 

quarter 1.697,444 

quarter 2.330,959 

quarter 2,932,890 



Total 8,248,755 

Radio-tube sales showed a corre- 
sponding increase over the preceding 
year. Following are the figures on 
tube output, with values given in fac- 
tory selling prices: 



1935 


Tubes 




Value 


Jan. -Mar. 


. .. 15.247.456 


$ 


5,266,500 


Apr.-June . . 


. , . 14,454,219 




4,563,800 


July-Sept. . . 


. .. 20,559,634 




7,365,897 


Oct. -Dec. . . . 


. .. 25,450,000 




9,268,000 


Total 


. . . 75,711,309 


$ 


26,464,197 


1936 


Tubes 




Value 


Jan. -Mar. . . 


. .. 18,475,077 


5 


6,066,462 


Apr.-June . . 


. .. 19,971,773 




6,595,378 


July-Sept. . . 


. .. 28,965,512 




9^34,460 


Oct.-Dec. ... 


. .. 30.891,846 




9,846,100 


Total . . 


. .. 98,304,208 


$ 


31.942.400 




April, 1937 




Vance Woodcox, new field sales man- 
ager for RCA- Victor, at Camden. 

CAUGHT IN THE THIRD NET 

* Champ spreader among the net- 
works these daj's is the fiercely ex- 
panding Mutual Broadcasting Sys- 
tem. Only 30 months old, MBS has 
been coast-to-coast since last Decem- 
ber; this month it adds 8 stations of 
the Oklahoma Network, bringing the 
total hook-up to 51. Mutual talks 
up special flexibility of coverage, and 
mentions that it has a set-up which 
"moves Hollywood east." 

Station counts on the other net- 
works are today: NBO Eed and Blue 
124, Columbia 103. 




Sam Ruttenberg of Amperite examines 

mike which, after immersion ten days 

in Portsmouth, Ohio, flood, worked as 

well as ever. 



SPECIAL TRAIN TO 
TRADE SHOW, CHICAGO 

* For the first time since 1931, 
at least one special train will carry 
an Eastern contingent of manufac- 
turers, distributors, sales representa- 
tives, and others to the National 
Trade Show in Chicago. 

The "Radio Industry Special" 
will leave Grand Central Station 
over the New York Central Lines 
June 9, to arrive in Chicago on the 
morning of June 10, opening day of 
the Trade Show. Cars will be picked 
uo at Albany, Rochester, Buffalo, 
Cleveland, and other points en route. 
The Albany car will start from Bos- 
ton, thus permitting the New Eng- 
land radio trade to join the "Special."' 

The Committee on Transportation 
comprises Perry Saftler, Chas. Golen- 
paul of the Sales Managers Club, 
and Dan Bittan, Jack Price and 
Earl Dietrich, all of The "Representa- 
tives." Details about the "Radio 
Industry Special" can be obtained 
from Perry Saftler at 27 Warren 
Street, New York City, or members 
of the Committee. 

CROWNING SEASON 

* Hand that builds the programs 
still sells the sets, and right now 
that hand is plenty fleet. London's 
Coronation event will of course be 
a high point in the current broad- 
cast season ; NBC alone will have 50 
mikes scattered slyly around Buck- 
ingham Palace and Westminster 
Abbey, with which to pick up the 
post-Simpson events. 

Big-league baseball is now under 
way, with plenty of cash meaning 
for the tube as well as the set busi- 
ness. Such persons as Mrs. Roose- 
velt and Grace Moore have started 
new broadcasts. Then there's the 
Spring season of Metropolitan Opera, 
and Nat'l Music Week, May 2-8. 

MARKING THE CHAIN PROGRAMS 

* Many of the new 1937 radio 
sets will have push-button control, 
each receiver will be locally "set up" 
so that by pushing buttons marked 
with the letters of nearby stations, 
the desired program will be heard. 

This new development seems to set 
the stage for a more easy designation 
of chain programs. It would be an 
easy matter to have the chain-station 
push buttons of distinctive colors, so 
that NBC Red, NBC Blue, CBS, and 
MBS programs could be at once 
located on any up-to-date set. 

Many listeners follow particular 



chain features. Researches made by 
Radio Today indicate that the great 
mass of these listeners, while familiar 
with their local broadcast stations, do 
not know what the station's chain 
afiiliation may be. To find a popular 
chain program thus becomes a matter 
of trial and error, by tuning in all 
local stations. 

If the radio dealer who sells new 
sets — or the service man who repairs 
older receivers — made a regular prac- 
tice of marking in the network affilia- 
tions of local stations, this would be 
of great convenience to the listener, 
and of great advantage to the broad- 
cast chains and their advertisers. 

RMA DIRECTORS, NEW YORK, 
APRIL 22 

■*■ The Radio Manufacturers Asso- 
ciation board of directors will hold its 
next and regular Spring meeting at 
the Hotel Roosevelt, New York City, 
April 22, instead of at Hot Springs, 
Va., as previously planned. Orig- 
inally it has been hoped to combine 
the board meeting with a vacation 
session at Hot Springs, but engage- 
ments of several of the directors made 
this impossible. 

The RMA annual convention will 
be held at Chicago, June 8-9, pre- 
ceding the National Radio Parts 
Show. A big industry banquet in 
the Hotel Stevens grand ballroom is 
a projected highlight of the Chicago 
convention. 




A. A. Berard of Ward-Leonard, vice- 
president of National Chicago Trade 
Show, June 10-13. 



10 



Radio Today 




Bill Osier, vice-president Cornish 

Wire, on a three-week cruise to the 

West Indies. 

RADIO EXPORTS UP 28% 

* From Wasliingtoii comes De- 
partment of Commerce report that 
radio exports are very much on tlie 
up and up. Kadio shipments for 
February, 1937, were $2,376,000, as 
against $1,829,000 a year ago — an in- 
crease of 30 per cent for the month. 

For the two months ending Febru- 
ary 28, 1937, radio exports were 
$4,960,000, as compared with $2,868,- 
000 for the corresponding two moutlis 
of 1936 indicating' 28% increase. 

Last year 600,000 radio sets were 
exported, or 7% per cent of the total 
radio sets made. 

FINE FEMININE HAND 

* Ten million critical dames of 
this country decide every year to 
ballot daintily over which radio pro- 
grams they think are the best. Gals 
are affiliated with the Women's ISTa- 
tional Radio Committee, which 
throws an annual dinner when things 
are decided, awards scrolls. Outfit 
often waxes quite acid over what it 
regards as a lack of quality pro- 
grams. 

This year, the Committee said that 
the best musical program was the 
Detroit Symphony Orchestra ; best 
variety show, Rudy Vallee Hour ; 
best educational program, Chicago 
University Round Table; best news 
Virogram, Boake Carter; best chil- 
dren's program, Dorothy Gordoji"-? 
Children's Corner; best drama. 
WABC Radio Theater. 



Two special scrolls were awarded : 
one to Mutual's WOR for "outstand- 
ing contribution to serious music," 
the other to Dr. Walter Damrosch, 
who got super-mention for "fore- 
sightedness in grasping the possibil- 
ities of radio for- the dissemination 
of musical culture." 



RADIO SALES BY MONTHS, 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

* The Electric Institute of Wash- 
ington, D. C, compiles all sales of 
radio and electrical appliances in the 
capital-city territory, as reported by 
dealers and distributors. Listed be- 
low are monthly sales of radio sets 
to dealers. "Figures shown are radio 
sets averaging $.55, and do not in- 
clude sales of midget sets — we did 
not attempt to keep a monthly rec- 
ord of midgets," explains William G. 
Llills, assistant director. 

1936 sales by wholesalers : 

January 2,437 

February 1,600 

March 1.763 

April 1,652 

May 709 

June . 1,S32 

July 1,763 

August 3,245 

September 4,246 

October 5,009 

November 4.005 

December 6,726 

Total sales through 

wholesalers 34.9S7 

In addition, 9,000 midgets were 
sold at an average list price of $11 
($99,000). Also, local radio dealers 
reported purchasing direct from man- 
ufacturers 1,711 radio setis, at an 
average list price of $55 ($91,105). 




Bob Lacey, popular radio exec, be- 
comes general manager of new 
Clarion Corporation, Chicago. 

Total radio sales going into the 
Washington market thus aggregated 
45,689 sets, at a total list value of 
$2,117,390. 

Washington has one of the very 
highest percentages of radio satura- 
tion in the country, the recent report 
of the Joint Committee on Radio Re- 
search giving it 125,000 homes with 
radios, in a population of 487,000. 
This is a saturation of 256 radio 
homes per thousand of popidation. 
Other high saturations are : Los An- 
geles, 268 per 1,000; San Francisco, 
269; Miami, 250; Des Moines, 257; 
Kansas City, 258. U. S. average, 186. 




C. W. (Bill) Shaw, new general sales manager for Hygrade-Sylvania, lays plans 
for putting new tubes in old sockets, with Paul S. Ellison, renewal sales head. 



April, 1937 



11 



THE "ALL-RADIO" DEALER 

New tube-ampliFier lines, inter-phones, sound, auto-radio/ etc., complete 
merchandise structure begun by home sets, phonographs, records 



* GENTLEMAN - DEALER of 
10 years back, the man with the 
phonographs and the polished man- 
ners, will tell you that his store used 
to be a heart-unit of the community. 

Outfits operated those tine days on 
a solid routine, quiet and authentic. 
They were a non-chiseling-, low-pres- 
sure lot, discreet and prosperous. 
They understood good music and 
sold things to everybody in town who 
spoke the language; they were civ- 
ilized authorities on home entertain- 
ment. 

Some 8,000 of these dealers with- 
drew in confusion when radio got 
under way as a specialty. It was a 
musical instrument, sure, but these 
gents had neither the wish nor the 
strength to out-promote some of the 
noisy opportunists who rushed in to 
sell it as a gadget on which the price 
could be cut. 



The road back 

If the trade tempo reduced the cul- 
tural aspects of radio merchandising, 
it also produced a series of new prod- 
ucts with which the old-type dealer 
may come back for keeps. 

New trend offers a series of im- 
proved radio-tube devices including 
intercommunicating systems, phono- 
graph-radios, sound apparatus, elec- 
tronic musical instruments and or- 
,gans, etc. These are added to the 
stand-bys : home and auto sets, tubes, 



parts, servicing, records, etc. One 
day television will be added. 

Outlook is that the business may 
regain its long-lost chance to exist 
mainly to sell only-radio-musical de- 
vices. Attached are a natural ap- 
peal and a deal of profit. 

Nature of these items is such that 
the former technique, the old lan- 
guage, is stirred to life. Dealers 
will still sell merchandise which has 
special sales value from a seasonal 
angle, but the main acquaintance 
will be with amplification via the 
tube. 

Sober again 

Radio stores will once more become 
shops of character and prestige, listeil 
in the local schematic as there-to- 
stay entertainment centers. Fact 
that music has taken to the air only 
gives them more authority and more 
chance to do the finer type of busi- 
ness, coupled with technical expert- 
ness. 

Bond of the most advantage has 
always been the store's acquaintance 
with local clubs, listening groups, 
churches, schools, civic groups, etc. 

Today, therefore, the all-radio 
dealer must also keep in close touch 
with the broadcast offerings on the 
air. He must know about the great 
features which are coming — the Met- 
roDolitan Opera broadcasts, the trans- 
Atlantic programs, the Toseanini 
concerts, and the many unique events 



THE 1937 DEALER 

works with 

Musical leaders 
Civic groups 
Schools Churches 
Social clubs 
Newspapers 
Local broadcasters 
Utilities 
Other stores 



HIS 1937 STORE 

features 



Home sets 
Auto sets 
Phonograph-radios 
Records Tubes 
Intercommunicators 
Sound equipment 
Electronic instruments 
Servicing 



12 



on which the broadcasters spend for- 
tunes to report adequately. For these 
outstanding broadcasts the radio 
dealer can appoint himself local pro- 
motion and bally-hoo man, — to see 
that the whole community, homes, 
clubs, schools, take full advantage of 
the treasures on the air. 

Clear interference 

In helping to solve the problems of 
local interference, the dealer can ac- 
complish much by cooperation with 
the local utility company. Local re- 
ception can be no better than the 
noise-level of man-made interference 
in the vicinity. The radio dealer 
should have proper instruments in 
his service shop, to locate electrical 
interference. And he should work 
with the local broadcast station and 
the electric-light company to track 
down interference troubles reported 
from those two sources. 

Part of the excitement is due to the 
fact that the possible all-radio set- 
up includes many products for which 
the local market is practically un- 
touched. The sound business doesn't 
know its own strength, as the list of 
applications increases every day. Ob- 
erve that no less than 95 good-sized 
companies are manufacturing the ap- 
paratus. 

As for intercommunicating systems, 
which are perhaps the newest of 
radio's own products, the outlook has 
continually brightened since the idea 
appeared. Actually, the majorit,y of 
receiver prospects are also inter-phone 
prospects. A total of 20 manufac- 
turers are already in the field. 

Set engineers have learned the 
trick of quickly outmoding the re- 
ceivers of another year, and there are 
nearly 150 companies doing it. It 
will be recalled, too, in building up 
the all-radio picture, that there are 
C20 makers of parts, 55 manufac- 
turers of test equipment, and 13 tube 
makers. 

Thus the total number of manu- 
facturers in the tube-amplifying field 
nears 1,000. They have national ad- 
vertising campaigns, research depart- 
ments preparing more gadgets, mod- 
ern promotion policies. Little doubt 
but that the new all-radio trade struc- 
ture will be substantial and profitable. 

Radio Today 



n 



^i^ytr^'V:,- 



SPRING CLEAN-UP 

Every home radio installation needs a thorough going-over 
by a competent service man — and a new set of tubes! 



DIRTY INSULATORS^ V 



'-#VM€! 




BROKEN^ LOOSE LAMP 
SOCKET n 



BROKEN 
CORD 

LOOSE 
PLUG 






DEFECTIVE 
SPLICE 



^-BROKEN 
LEAD-IN 



OVERHANGING 
BRANCHES 



.CORRODED CONNECTION 
1/ AT LEAD-IN STRIP 

_ INSIDE WIRE BROKEN 

' SHORTED 

I LIGHTNING ARRESTOR 

r^-CORRODED OR RUSTY 
GROUND CONNECTION 



DEFECTIVE 
APPLIANCES 

LOOSE, RATTLING 
SPEAKER GRILLE 



DUSTY 
CHASSIS 



DIRTY 

CONDENSER 

COPYRIGHT 
1937 




RADIO 
TODAY 



LOOSE KNOBS 



LOOSE OR SLIPPING DIAL 



TINNV OR 

/' RATTLING 

/ SPEAKER 

NOISY VOLUME CONTROL 

ALIGNMENT OF I.F.5 R.F.STAGES 

NOISY & WEAK TUBES 



HIGHER PRICES ARE AHEAD 

Radio sets must Follow upwards with increasing cost oF materials, parts and labor 



* EADIO prices are going up. 

This price movement is already ap- 
parent in almost every commodity. 
And radio sets will be no exception. 

Price levels of the new receivers 
seem likely to be 10 or 15 per cent 
above the prices of corresponding sets 
for the past season. Raw-material 
costs, parts costs, and labor costs have 
all responded to the upward surge of 
recent prosperity. 

And these up-surges are bound to 
carry radio prices upward with them 
in the opinion of radio industry lead- 
ers. When the new models are in- 
troduced in May and June, the higher 
levels are likely to take eifect. 

Scarcity of materials 

Scarcity is another factor which 
has had the set-makers worried. For 
not only are prices of raw materials, 
metals, wood veneers, etc., up 10 per 
cent or more, but in some cases these 
raw materials are so scarce that they 
are being rationed out on the same 
basis as purchases were made a year 
ago. 

Even the forces recently set in mo- 
tion by the Administration at Wash- 
ington to stop further increases in 
raw material prices by shutting off 
capital-goods purchases by the Gov- 
ernment, do not seem likely to head 
off radio-set price increases, for such 
price-revisions are already necessary 
based on the raw-material advances 
that have occurred. 

Meanwhile it is expected that fur- 









1 »e.5 


METAL PRICES 


/:'"■' 


1 ' 1 1 1 i ; 





How metals have soared in price since 

1932. Chart by National Industrial 

Conference Board. 



ther labor-cost adjustments may be 
made. While labor contracts have 
been completed in some sections, these 
still remain to be negotiated in other 
plants, and such manufacturers are 
delaying announcing new higher 
prices until they can determine just 
how far these will have to go. 

Radio Today has invited expres- 
sions from radio industry leaders on 
the price situation facing the trade, 
and presents the following informa- 
tive comments from well-known per- 
sonalities of radio. 

Arthur T. ^Murray, chairman of the 




radio-receiver section of the Radio 
Manufacturers Association and presi- 
dent of Unite'd American Bosch, says : 
"To my mind there is no question 
but that radio prices must be higher 
during the coming season — since, go- 
ing back to the source, the cost of 
practically everything is the result of 
the labor employed in its fabrication — 
back, in fact, to the amount that is 
paid labor for taking metal in the 
form of ore from the ground. "With 
labor rates advancing the way they 
are, I don't see how there can be any 
question that prices will be higher." 



M 



ore increases 



lat 



er 



Speaking for Philco, Vice-President 
Sayre M. Ramsdell writes : 

"Our feeling is that radio cannot 
escape higher prices this season. The 
rise will probably be startling. But it 
will he absolutely necessary, due to 
increases of from 50 per cent to 100 
per cent in the cost of basic materials 
entering into radio construction — as 
well as increased costs in radio manu- 
facturing plants themselves. Not only 
will initial prices for the new season 
be higher, but there is every likelihood 
that further increases will be neces- 
sary as the season progresses." 

In Commander McDonald's absence. 
Zenith's Paul M. Bryant comments : 

"The radio business, as well as most 
other businesses, is going to see higher 
prices this season. This advance In 
price is inevitable, in view of the ris- 
ing costs of raw materials, parts and 
labor. The effect of higher prices 
should be felt at the time new lines 
are introduced." 

Ernest H. Vogel, radio manager for 
General Electric, anticipates : 

"There is no doubt and every indi- 
cation that, due to increased material 
and labor costs, prices of radio sets 
for the coming season will be definitely 
higher than those that prevailed a 
year ago. We are not in a position to 
determine now what percentage of in- 
crease will be in effect as the items 
of labor and materials are constantly 
in flux." 

Ben Abrams, Emerson's president, 
sees price advances five months off. 
He says : 

"Briefly, my answer is that we will 
see higher prices about September or 
October. My opinion is that the in- 
crease will be in the neighborhood of 
about 10 per cent. Actually, there is 
good reason for increased prices to be 
in effect right now. However, the sea- 
son of the year and the fact that a 
few manufacturers are liquidating 
some of last year's models, makes it 
difficult to put into effect the right 
prices on radio sets at this time. 

"I feel that even higher than 10 per 
cent increases should go into effect in 
the fall, if some of the manufacturers 
would put into effect a better control 



14 



Radio Todo" 



on production. Unfortunately, exces- 
sive production makes necessary the 
very short profit on radio, which in 
many cases is inconsistent with good 
business practice, and particularly so 
as regards a product such as radio for 
which the buying public is prepared 
to pay a fair price, it only the indus- 
try would stop forcing on the marliet 
more radio sets than the market can 
consume. As a result, the price level 
is kept down, and all at the expense of 
the manufacturer, jobber and dealer. 
The only remedy I can see, is the start- 
ing of a movement for control of pro- 
duction, industry-wise." 

01* Dehhie Depreciation 

Lee McCanne, radio sales manager 
for Stromberg-Carlson, sees saner 
bookkeeping by radio manufacturers 
as a factor in price advances : 

"In increasing prices, I believe most 
manufacturers will try to avoid the 
deliberate under-pricing of certain 
models as loss-leaders, and will try to 
cover their normal overhead with a 
proper provision for depreciation. 
Much has been said about restricting 
prices to the bare amount necessary 
to cover increased costs of material 
and labor and attempts have been 
made by politieians to picture as 
'heartless connivers' those manufac- 
turers who try to put their prices 
where they ought to be to provide a 
normal manufacturing profit. 

"The fact remains, however, that in 
recent lean years with intense compe- 
tition one manufacturer after another 
has stopped writing off normal depre- 
ciation on his plant and equipment; 
has arbitrarily set up a fictitious low 
overhead or has deliberately under- 
priced one or more models while in 
the throes of that fever known as 
'volume mania.' - 

"After three or four years of this 
kind of juggling of figures. Old Man 
Depreciation begins to catch up with 
us. Machines wear out and there is no 
fund built up to replace them. People 
start buying his loss-leaders faster and 
the manufacturer wakes up to find he 
is losing money in a hurry." 



Sounder basis 

Expressing the views of President 
Alschuler of Sentinel, E. G. May 
writes: 

"Surely the distributor and dealer 
are not in a position to absorb ad- 
vanced costs, as their expenses of do- 
ing business must necessarily increase 
proportionately to the higher costs of 
labor, rents, etc. 

"The above is all well and good, as 
it certainly would not be out of order 
for the radio business to be more re- 
munerative for all concerned. Restraint 
must be used, however, to prevent 
this inflation of prices reaching a 
point where prices are beyond the 
means of the ultimate consumer upon 
whom we are all dependent. 

"This rising market represents an 
opportunity for the establishing of 
resale prices on a sounder basis than 
we have been forced to submit to in 
the past. We hope it will be treated 
as such, rather than as an opportunity 
to skyrocket profits to a point where 
the entire industry will suffer." 



TUBES CRY "REPLACE US" 

— yet millions of sockets are renewed only once in 5 years! 

— present replacement sales should be doubled or tripled. 



* THE radio tube business has 
only one major fault. Eadio tubes 
stay in operating service too long! 
For too many years those faithful 
little electron-emitters go on glowing 
feebly in the dark and reproducing 
the wonderful melodies of the night 
air. They just won't give up the 
ghost. 

True, they grow weaker and weaker 
with the months after the first year 
or two. But though they may distort 
the beautiful tones of priceless artists, 
cause noise and hum, and require the 
volume control to be hiked up to the 
limit, callous radio listeners seem to 
go on expecting radio tubes to work 
three years, four years, five years, and 
maybe longer. 

44 million tubes 

For actually the average use now 
imposed upon radio tubes in this 
country is five years! Figure it out 
for yourself. 

Last year 44 million tubes or there- 
abouts were sold for replacement pur- 
poses. Altogether we now have about 
29 million home radios and 5 million 



44- 



MILLION 
REPLACEMENT TUBES, 
YEARLY 



automobile radios in use. Allowing 
six tubes or so per set, this is a total 
of 230 million tube sockets in the 
home and auto radios. To this num- 
ber, add ten million sockets to cover 
those in radio experimenters' outfits, 
"ham" stations, public-address and 
sound systems, and other miscellane- 
ous uses, and the number of sockets 
rises to 240 millions, as shown below. 

Dollars waiting 

And, of course, 44 million tubes 
poured into 240 million sockets, is one 
tube renewal only every fifth year or 
longer — only a mere sprinkle! 

If tubes were to be replaced even 
every second year, the present tube- 
replacement business would be doubled 
and tripled. 

This tube-replacement problem de- 
mands the attention of every radio 
dealer, serviceman and distributor. 
For each, it represents a golden op- 
portunity — a chance to pick up wait- 
ing dollars — while helping millions of 
listeners put their sets in shape to 
enjoy fully the great programs the 
broadcasters send them. 



ONLY A 
.LIGHT 
|;SAR INKLE 



200 MILLION SOCKETS 



-M) 



u^li^^WA 




April, 1937 




IN 29 MILLION HOME RADIOS 



24-0 MILLION TUBE SOCKETS NOW IN USE 



RADIO DEALERS AVERAGED $19,300 

— replies to RADIO TODAY S survey show installment sales high 
— most dealers reporting have profitable service departments 



* EESPONSES to the question- 
naires sent out to radio dealers, in 
Radio Today's extensive "Survey of 
Radio Selling Costs and Profits," are 
now coming in to the New York 
office, and already retail radio sales 
aggregating three million dollars have 
been reported on. Most of the forms 
returned have been fully filled in to 
give complete merchandising infor- 
mation on the businesses reporting, 
although in some instances occasional 
details are found to be omitted. A 
very large proportion of the replies, 
however, will be found usable for 
compilation. 

In the replies from dealers report- 
ing fully, yearly volumes of sales of 
radio run from a few hundred dol- 
lars annually, up to hundreds of 
thousands of dollars of 1936 sales. 
But the average of the dealers report- 
ing thus far, falls at $19,300 a year 
for radio sales. (This checks closely 
with the "average radio dealer" figure 
cited in the January, 1937, issue of 
Radio Today, where the community 
"key-dealer" was assumed to sell 
$17,600 in sets and about $2,000 in 
tubes, besides doing- $4,000 in radio 
servicing and repairs.) 

Most dealers reported their 1930 



radio sales well ahead of 1935. Some 
enjoyed a two-fold and three-fold in- 
crease in sales volume ; a few others 
fell behind 1935 but gave no reason 
to account for it. The average of 
the replies received indicated an in- 
crease of 60 per cent for 1936, over 

1935. (Radio sales in 1936 160 per 
cent of the 1935 figure.) 

Installment sales lead 

A considerable extent of install- 
ment business was indicated in 1936, 
particularly in the more active con- 
cerns doing the larger volumes of 
business. Thus for the dealers re- 
porting, the relative sales handled on 
cash, credit, and easy-payments, rank 
as follows : 

Cash sales 30% 

Credit sales 18% 

Installment sales 52% 

The majority of the radio dealers 
reporting have their own radio-servic- 
ing and repair organizations, in addi- 
tion to their regular installation 
men. These servicing businesses 
seem to have made money during 

1936, and since this additional in- 
come was earned without any con- 
siderable capital outlay, it would ap- 



pear that a service department is a 
profitable adjunct for a radio retail 
store, if it is supervised by careful 
management. 

Listed below are representative 
statements for radio businesses fall- 
ing around the average of the replies 
received — $19,300. These figures, 
which are shown without identifica- 
tion, can be used as valuable com- 
parisons for the reader's own busi- 
ness, if within this range of $15,000 
to $30,000 yearly. 

The complete returns of the survey 
will be analyzed by various group- 
ings, and will be reported on fully 
in following issues. 

ON-YOUR-TOES DEMO 

* Sales experts are steadily advis- 
ing dealers that all radio displays 
should be connected to the proper 
power, aerial and ground outlets at 
all times. Several dealers who make 
this a part of their policy have re- 
ported that it really makes for effec- 
tiveness and ease in sales presenta- 
tions. 

Facts are that if a dealer is forced 
to hold up his demonstration, pros- 
pect will exhibit impatience. 



SOME REPRESENTATIVE OPERATING STATEMENTS FROM RADIO DEALERS IN THE $15,000 -$30,000 CLASS 



1 . Sales of Radio in 1 936 

(gross sales minus returns, etc.) 

2. Opening Inventory of Radio, Jan. 1, 1936 

(at cost, unless otherwise noted) 

3. Radio Merchandise Purchased during 1936 

4. Closing Inventory of Radio, Dec. 31, 1936 

(at cost, unless otherwise noted) 

5. Radio Sales represent of my total business 

6. Expense of handling sales during 1936 

a. Salaries of owners or officers 

b. Employees' salaries and wages 

c. Rent 

d. Advertising 

Light, heat, telephone 

Free servicing during guarantee period, delivery, 
installation 

g. All other expenses 

Total cost of doing business 

operate a radio-repair or "service" department 

which during 1936 took in a total of 

To operate this repair department during same period, 
cost, not including free servicing of sets sold (see 6f.) . 
Making a net profit on repair dept. of 

8. Radio sales in 1936 in terms of 1935 

9. My 1936 radio sales were ("Cash 

divided approximately i Credit 

(in percentages) [installment sales 



f. 



7. I 



A 
$17,194 

1,267 

12,278 
2,634 

80% 

2,007 
689 
240 
446 
179 

127 
1,052 
4,600 



180% 
25 
15 
60 



$19,865 

1,942 

10,843 
2,367 

77% 

2,400 

1,889 

700 

632 

240 

798 
2,000 
6,261 

937 

850 
87 
116% 
30 
10 
60 



C D 

$21,500 $22,331 



2,400 

1 4,000 
2,100 

60% 

3,000 

3,000 

1,440 

100 

480 



1,610 

13,809 
2,061 

85% 

4,636 
416 
328 
543 
197 



80 

250 

8,350 

9,600 

8,400 

1,200 2,565 

96% 97% 

40 15 

40 

20 85 



E 
$23,451 

566 

1 2,066 
520 

65% 



F 
$27,352 

1,119 

13,889 
1,555 

34% 



G 
$29,215 

2,100 

13,700 
2,450 

20% 



3,000 


1,810 


4,200 


2,000 


6,507 


3,745 


540 




900 


300 




1,350 


250 


382 


600 


250 




250 


125 


3,500 


300 


6,465 


12,200 


11,355 




20,924 

5,834 
14,089 




120% 




85% 


4 




5 


9 






87 




95 



16 



Radio Today 




FOUR STRIDES 
IN SELLING 

ReFrain: "In the Good 
Old Summer Time" 



"We shout, we orate, we go into ecstasies 
over a model. . ." 

In other words, we have to watch it, or 
we make the customer feel "the strain of 
buying." 

Radio sales progress outlined by these 
pictures has four new angles on that sub- 
ject. Story is told in terms of any dealer's 
enthusiasm for his merchandise. 

In No, 1, a group of "oversold" house- 
wives are chosen. They've been "simply 
deluged with salesmen and phone calls . . . 
driven frantic!" 

Then in No. 2, the dealer and his sales- 
man decide to be through with the kind of 
selling which only confuses the prospect. 
They decide to accent just the talking 
points big enough to mark their merchan- 
dise as genuinely "different." 

In No. 3, the salesman calls by appoint- 
ment, quietly opens his radio argument by 
using essentials only. He knows she "will 
be interested in seeing something very 
Jiiuch diiferent from the others." 

Last is No. 4, in which the salesman 
pleasantly tries to get this sort of answer 
from the prospect: "Well, for my peace 
of mind I suppose I'll have to or I'll always 
wonder if I didn't miss something." Prob- 
ably there's no more to the story except the 
radio contract. 

Scenes in this series were chosen from 
the new Fairbanks-Morse talking slide film, 
"Mrs. Martin Sees It Through." 

April, 1937 





w. 


Move No. 2 H 




WHAT'S HAPPENING IN RECEIVERS 

Automatic selectivity control and acoustic treatment bring better tone 
Set designers. Facing rising prices, use ingenuity to cut production costs 



* "JUST push the button, and — 
presto — there's your station" will be 
the spectacular feature in selling the 
1937-8 radio sets. Push-button tun- 
ing and remote control will be used in 
many of the better receivers accord- 
ing to authoritative sources. No 
longer will there he any need for 
fumbling with dials — ^just push the 
button on the set or on a control 
box located beside an easy chair and 
instantly the program will be heard. 

This and other tuning refinements 
will be the most-widely adopted fea- 
ture for the coming year. Some tele- 
phone-tj'pe dials will be redesigned 
and improved for better appearance 
and easier operation. Automatic 
tuning of this year's tjToe will prob- 
ably be extended to the lower-priced 
sets, while the push-button method 
using a motor drive will be employed 
on the more expensive models. 

Automatic selectivity 

Automatic selectivity control may 
be used in some of the receivers to 
supplement automatic volume and 
frequency controls. This new "auto- 
matic" expands the I.F. amplifier 
and provides high fidelity reception 
when the signal strength of the sta- 
tion is sufficient to ride over the 



local noises and static. And when 
the signal is weak the I.F. amj)lifior 
becomes sharp or narrow so as to ex- 
clude noise and interfering signals. 
Because of its automatic feature it 
does away with the need of a fidelity 
control on the front of the set — 
consequently tuning is simplified. 

More tubes for the same money 
will be featured by some manufac- 
turers. Separate oscillator tubes, 
diode detectors, and control tubes 
are to be utilized. Much of this 
padding can be justified from an en- 
gineering point of view, but in other 
cases it is being done to obtain a 
sales advantage. 

Gadgets pruned 

With an increased production cost 
of approximately 15 per cent antici- 
pated because of labor and raw ma- 
terials, it is more than likely that 
some of the sets will be stripped of 
their refinements if the price is to 
remain the same. However, it is 
planned to provide the same perform- 
ance in the sets at the same price if 
possible. Other proposed ways of 
beating the increased costs are to use 
this year's chassis with minor 
changes. In this way the manufactur- 
ers will be able to save on tooling costs. 





LOUNGE STYLE radio is shown here as an end-piece for comer seats. 

Modernage, New York City furniture stylists, designed it around a 6-tube 

Stromberg-Carlson. Philco, Zenith and Emerson also have "end-table" sets. 



FINGERTIP access to phonograph, 
records, radio, offered by Sonora. 

Whatever the means iitilized, there 
will still be the $39.95, $49.95, $59.95, 
etc., price classifications for dealers 
to feature. Perhaps in the smaller 
sets there will be a smaller number 
of tubes, while the large models may be 
padded by using single-purpose tubes. 

AC-DC sets 

Introduction of the beam-power- 
output tubes for AC-DC sets means 
that many of these sets will have a 
power of 2 watts in place of the usual 
1 watt. Speaking of beam power 
tubes, it is not unlikely that degen- 
erative feed-back will be found in 
the audio stages of a few sets — al- 
ready it is being employed in power 
amplifiers for sound systems. That 
means higher quality reproduction. 

Hand in hand with the lower dis- 
tortion in the amplifiers, acoustic 
compensation and treatment is sched- 
uled for wider use. In the Master- 
piece "V built by McMurdo Silver, 
excellent reproduction is obtained 
through the utilization of bass-reflex 
principles developed by Hugh 
Ivnowles of Jensen. Other methods 
are the "Magic Voice," "Acoustic 
Clarifiers," and "Acoustical Laby- 
rinth" and their use will be contin- 
ued. Even on the lower-priced sets, 
absorbing materials will be placed in 
the cabinets to reduce the boom 
caused by cabinet resonance. This, 



18 



Radio Today 



coupled with more scientific design 
will give the new models superior 
tonal quality at the lower frequencies. 
The Kadette "Equafonic" receiver 
has a non-directional system of sound 
distribution which projects the sound 
equally in all directions. This is ac- 
complished by mounting the speaker 
vertically and having a curved reflect- 
ing baffle above the cone to direct the 
sound horizontally. 

Pre-selection of stations 

Almost human tuning device has 
been developed by Harold J. Kaye of 
Newton, Mass., which will automat- 
ically turn the radio on and off and 
tune in any desired station. Unlike 
a human it never forgets to tune in 
any program that has been previously 
set up. Different from previous devices, 
it will work for a period of seven 
days with different set-ups for each 
day. Since programs are scheduled 
at 15-minute intervals the pre-selec- 
tor works on the same basis — any 
desired set-up for each interval. Just 
imagine setting up the set on Sun- 
day morning for the entire week and 
having favorite programs tuned in 
automatically on the dot — that is 
just what one of the editors has re- 
cently witnessed. Any combination 
of stations and off periods can be 
utilized. Plans at present are for 
marketing it late this season. 

RADIO WILL SET FURNITURE 
STYLES— VASSaS 

* There'll come a time when the 
man on his way downtown to buy 
furniture will stop in at the corner 
radio store to see what his new living 
room suite ought to look like, ac- 
cording to the prediction of John 
Vassos, who is design consultant for 
EGA in Camden. 

Vassos says that already the ex- 
panding" radio business has brought 
"modernism" into the American con- 
sciousness, in furniture as well as 
radio. Everybody notices what radios 
look like, he says, because they see 
the sets in the ads and because list- 
eners stare at dials when the things 
are functioning. Tou can't just push 
a radio over in a corner, like a chair 
or a table, and forget about it. That's 
the reason chairs and tables have got 
to spruce up to keep in step with 
radios. 

This doesn't mean that radios are 
going to be sold by furniture depart- 
ments, according to Vassos. The 
noise of customers giving a whirl to 
the volume control would disturb 
newlyweds talking about Chippendale, 
Duncan Phyfe and the mode mo- 




TILT-TOP table as another treat- 
ment of the small set, sponsored by 
Rogers-Majestic Corp., Ltd., Canada. 

derne. But it does mean that radio 
dealers, sooner or later, will have to 
take a leaf from the book of furni- 
ture rules and sell sets somewhat in 
the furniture manner. 

Already certain large dealers have 
engaged Vassos to design whole new 
radio floors, so that buyers can see 
sets singly, on carpets and in home- 
like surroundings. As a cue to the 
smaller dealer, usually with insuf- 
ficient space to do this kind of a job, 
RCA has constructed and put in op- 



eration in New York, a small sample 
store, so designed that people can see 
single radios, rather than a number 
of sets in a pile. 

Radios now are furniture, accord- 
ing to Vassos, but there will come a 
time when they will be merely an 
architectural feature. The "radio of 
the future" will be recessed into a 
panel in the wall. But that will oc- 
cur when we are all living in pre- 
fabricated houses, with built-in air- 
conditioning, etc. 

In the meantime radio is going to 
continue right out in front where 
everybody looks at it. Right now 
what they see is a lot of streamlining, 
with chromium bands and whatnot, 
and that's the style for the 19.37 living 



WHY THEY BUY SOUNDLESS RADIOS 

* Wondrous theatrics of the good 
old-fashioned family brawl are no 
longer the vogue. Units of the fam- 
ily are buying silent radios, for one 
thing, to take the point out of domes- 
tic listening disputes. 

Husbands march into radio stores 
muttering about "keeping peace in 
the family." Wives are unhappy about 
a man "having his nose in the news- 
paper at all the wrong times." The 
in-laws speak out of turn again and 
observe that silent listening "might 
simplify things." 

So now they can buy equipment for 
private listening and snap at each 
other about something else for a while. 




PRETTY PAIR here are Helen Snook, record manager at Aeolian Co., N.Y.C, 

and an Ansley Radio-Dynaphone combination, with sliding top, 7 tubes, short 

wave, all controls within easy reach. 



April, 1937 



19 



EVERYDAY TRICKS for RADIO DEALERS 

Sales promotions by days, collected From six stores where tfiey were tested 




April 20-30 



20 — "Sell up'' by grouping sets in 
three's. When a customer mentions a 
certain price range, take him to the 
group which starts with that price, 
demonstrate all three. 

21 — Fix up a home movie in your 
window, with the screen on a side 
wall. Use it to plug your sound 
equipment. 

22 — Feature a display of portable 
phonograph-radios, with one record 
constantly in motion; use an outdoor 
background. 

23 — Check up on country clubs and 
beaches (opening about now) for 
sound prospects. 

24 — Run an ad in your local theatre 
bulletin, hooking up with radio stars 
on the screen. 

26 — Engage a local musical celebrity 
to appear in person in your store, 
distributing logs of network programs 
he recommends. 

27 — From second-hand car dealers, 
get new lists of car owners without 
radios, to let you in on the new mo- 
toring season. 

28 — Send out Radio Tour Maps cut 
in the shape of a radio tube. 

29 — Use the fact that May 1 is a 
moving day in large cities. Advise 
patrons : "Don't Spoil Your New 
Home With an Old Radio." 



30 — Set up a batch of large mirrors 
in your window, to show the backs 
of new sets to passers-by. 

May 1-19 

1 — Check up on all possible neighbor- 
hood display floors, where you may 
spot new receivers, with your name 
and address attached. 
3 — Send a letter to j'our prospects ex- 
plaining how the new Fair Trade 
Laws affect your sales and service. 

4 — Choose a lively announcement 
from a radio manufacturer, display 
it in the form of a large telegram. 

5 — Suggest to all parents that they 
will need a new set for their young- 
sters when school is out. 

6 — Send women prospects a special 
list of broadcasts aired regularly for 
them. 

7 — Promote the idea that sons and 
daughters should present Mother with 
a personal radio on Mother's Day 
next Sunday. 

8 — Get some London magazines and 
newspapers to exhibit with sets in 
your window, plugging the Corona- 
tion next Wednesday as a broadcast 
event. 

10 — Run an ad in old English type, 
listing all Coronation broadcasts due. 

n — Feature home recorders, suggest- 
ing that persons make their own rec- 



ords of speeches made at the crowning 
of the new King of England. 

12 — Coronation of George VI. 

13 — Use the song, "May I Have the 
Next Romance With You?" in a cir- 
cular with the word "romance" 
changed to "contract." 

14 — Send prospects a card showing a 
map of your town, with the location 
of your store accented. 

1 5 — Display a 6-ft. reproduction of 
the service or repair tickets used in 
your store. 

17 — Attach your card to the current 
"Reference Lists of Members of the 
IRSM'' for distribution among pros- 
pects. 

18 — Organize a Maytime canvassing 
campaign. Prepare a street directory 
so that canvassers will know house- 
holders' names when they call. 

19 — Send out notices of your prices 
on special "Spring Clean-Ups" of re- 
ceivers. 

Dealers pictured above, who con- 
tributed ideas to this month's cal- 
endar: C. F. Jones, Jones Radio Ser- 
vice, Perryton, Tex. ; Jack Davis, 
Eveready Radio, N. Y. C, Ed Lowe, 
Lowe Elec. Co.. New Roehelle, N. Y.; 
W. E. Engle, Engle Elec. Co., Lake- 
land, Fla. ; D. E. Feldman, Union 
Radio Service, New Roehelle, N. Y. ; 
and N. Goldman, Goldman Elec. Co., 
New Roehelle. 



20 



Radio Today 



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INVESTIGATE THIS SPECIAL OFFER! 



INCREASED production now permits us to sell genuine Acous- 
ticon Mystic Ears alone to authorized Dictograph Silent Radio 
dealers. Thousands who would like to own the Dictograph 
Silent Radio but are hesitating because of cost will grasp this op- 
portunity to give their sets the exclusive advantage of individual 
listening. 

No radio in recent years has shown the crowd-pulling powers of 
the Dictograph Silent Radio. One store reports 75 demonstrations 
from one ad. Another pulled 200 people into the store with a week- 
long window display. Now that you can offer the Mystic Ear for 
use with any set, the proportion of orders resulting from demonstra- 
tions will quadruple! 

Extensive national advertising has already created a huge de- 
mand that will focus action on your store the moment you show 
Dictograph Silent Radio. Our Spring campaign includes ads in 
Collier's, Good Housekeeping, House Beautiful, Modern Mechanix, 
Screen, the Fawcett Publications and other important publications 
reaching more than 10,000,000 prospects. 

To extend our already large dealer representation still further 
we have evolved a special offer you should investigate. It makes 
you a Dictograph Silent Radio dealer and also gives you an oppor- 
tunity to cash in heavily on individual sales of the Acousticon Mystic 
Ear. Fill in and mail the coupon today for full particulars. 



U. S. Pats. 101,980 and 
1,630,028: others pending. 



DICTOGRAPH PRODUCTS CO., INC. RT-4 ' 

580 Fifth Ave., .New York, N. Y. I 

Please send details concerning xoitr Dicto- ' 



I ncase sena aeiaits concerning 
I graph Silent Radio proposal. 

T NAME 



i 



DICTOGRAPH PRODUCTS CO., Inc. 

Executive Offices: 380 Fifth Ace., New York, N. Y, 

April, 1937 



ADDRESS 



CITY STATE 



/ am a retailer D 



/ am a wholesaler D 



jier D I 

21 



In the car. . . as in Ihe home . . . it's RCA ALL THE WAY! 



Only RCA Victor 



Auto Radios 



LOOK AT THESE SALES MAKING 
DISPLAYS FOR YOUR STORE! 



An example ot the selling 
help RCA Victor gives you! 





i%. 



(left) Single-unit dis- 
play, has controls at 
top; set, speaker 
mounted on sheet 
musicof "Merrily We 
Roll Along '■ 

(right) Escutcheon 
Plate display demon- 
strating various I) pes 
of "Custom con 
trols." Genero i, 
space behind front 
wall of display tor 
storing boxed 
controls. 



RCA Victor Auto Radio Features! 




Outstanding performance fea- 
tures, plus store sales helps, plus 
national advertising, plus RCA 
ALL THE WAY, equal MORE 
PROFITABLE SALES FOR YOU! 

RCA Victor makes it easy for you 
to cash in on auto radios this year! 
Its 1937 models are packed with 
powerful selhng features, led by the 
Magic Voice, famous from coast to 
coast as the creator of finer tone. 
In addition to the many quahty 
features to help you sell, RCA Victor 
will make your job easier and more 
lucrative with compelling magazine 
advertising in The Saturday Evening 
Post and Collier's. The RCA ALL 
THE WAY story will build more 
sales and volume for you. A vigor- 
ous merchandising plan— the sales- 
mspiring store displays shown on 
this page— all will do their share. 
1937 is going to be auto radio's big- 
gest year. Cash in with RCA Victor! 

KCA presents "The Magic Key" every Sunday 
2 to 3 p. m., E. S. T. on NBC Blue Network 



• RCA Victor 
Magic Voice 
Model 67M. 2 
. -8-inch Magic 
Voice speaker, 
6 tubes and 
Powertron,9w. 
output, 2 audio 
stages. Tone 
control, local- 
distantswitchon 
control panel. 




'(at rigit) RCA Victor 
Model 67M... 6 tubes, 
372 watts output. Out- 
standing performance 
at low price. 




22 



AUTO RADIO 

RCA Mfg. Co., Inc., Camden, N T 

A Service of the Radio Corporation of America 

Radio Today 



You'll make 

more money 

with 



Vol. 1. No. 2 



C. I. T. 

BUSINESS BUILDER 



Published by C. I.T. Corporation, unit of Commercial Investment Trust Corporation, capital and surplus over 5100,000.000 




APRIL 1937 



Leading C. I. T. Manufacturer and Distributor Clients 
Offer Dealers Limited Recourse Retail Finance Plan 




The average American is quick to under- 
stand basic economic principles once they 
are explained in simple terms. C.I.T. has 
condensed the theory, soundness and value 
of instalment selling in the illustration 
shown here. It's as simple as A.B.C. and is 
used in all C.I.T. magazine advertising. 
This little slate, like you used in the old red 
schoolhouse, reminds people that instal- 
ment purchasing by millions of families 
(a) makes possible electric refrigerators, 
radios, and other appliances at moderate 
prices (b) enables industry to give the pub- 
lic greater and greater values through vol- 
ume production. 

"...C.I.T. service has 
always clicked" 

— says a Western Dealer 

"... Your first real help was given me in 
1922 in Anaconda, Montana, when my busi- 
ness was expanding. Again in 1924 in 
Butte, Montana, you gave me draft privi- 
leges at a time when western Montana was 
infected with bank failures. I am sure you 
realize the local prestige and assistance this 
privilege gave me. 

"Over many years of business dealings, 
C.I.T. has always 'clicked' with me." 



Dealers find four important advantages 



ONE of the outstanding recent develop- 
ments in appliance financing, most 
appliance dealers now agree, is the new 
Limited Eecourse Retail Finance Plan of- 
fered by leading manufacturers and dis- 
tributors through C.I.T. 

This plan relieves the dealer of contin- 
gent liability after the first four monthly 
instalments on the purchase of a household 
appliance have been made. (Commercial in- 
stallations are not included.) It operates 
^vithout cost to the dealer. 

In the opinion of representative dealers, 
the Limited Recourse Plan has four major 
advantages : 

First : because the finance company relies 
on the dealer's endorsement only until the 
first four instalments are paid by the pur- 
chaser, the finance company's requirements 
for dealer quick assets are much lower than 
formerly. 



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C. I.T. Consumer 
Advertising 

Here is the C.I.T. full-page advertisement 
which appears this month in Saturday 
Evening Post, Collier's and Time. This 
good-will advertising is designed to explain 
instalment financing and to build business 
for the dealer who uses C.I.T. service. 



Second: as a result of this lowering of 
dealer credit requirements, many dealers 
who formerly were unable to qualify for 
financing service through a strong national 
finance company, are now able to secure 
such valuable financing accommodation. 

Third: because there is no pyramiding 
contingent liability resulting when a dealer 
does a large volume of business, this per- 
mits the dealer to show his bank and sup- 
pliers a better financial statement and en- 
titles him to more finance credit. 

Fourth: there is no holdback to tie up 
profit. The dealer receives 100% cash ad- 
vance at once. His capital remains fluid; 
his current assets increase and are not 
frozen beyond immediate reach. 

YOU CAN GO "LIMITED RECOURSE" 

Leading radio, refrigerator and appliance 
manufacturers have worked out the Lim- 
ited Recourse Retail Finance Plan for your 
benefit. They have selected C.I.T. to operate 
it for you. Through this plan you find it 
possible to concentrate on selling without 
having to worry about the mounting con- 
tingent liability which, under other meth- 
ods, would result from an increase in sales. 
The Limited Recourse Plan is simply a 
new and additional financing service de- 
signed to meet the requirements of those 
dealers who prefer to limit their contingent 
liability. However, the Full Recourse Plan 
is still active and is being used by large and 
small dealers alike, just as heretofore. 

PLAN PROVES POPULAR 

Appliance dealers both large and small have 
been quick to see the merit and to take ad- 
vantage of the new plan. Enthusiastic com- 
ment by many dealers, distributors and 
manufacturers interviewed is evidence that 
the plan has already successfully served the 
constructive merchandising purpose for^ 
which it was designed. Ask your local C.I.T. 
office for complete details of the Limited; 
Recourse Plan. i 



C I. T. BUSINESS BUILDER 



APRIL 1937 



AND Y£T COMPETITORS SAY BROWN IS JUST \MCilSf' 69 /l^mtif 





The poster shown here 

is proving immensely popular with appli- 
ance dealers the country over. It is also of- 
fered with easel back for counter use and in 
small size as a window sticker. Door handle 
cards as shown above and the consumer 
booklet with cover design similar to the 
poster can also be secured from the C.I.T. 
branch office nearest you. 



PHONE OR WRITE 

You can be sure of quick, personalized 
service through the C. I. T. branch near- 
estyou. These IGOlocal offices are manned 
by staffs that render a complete localized 
finance service — investigating credits, 
buying paper, making collections. 



The Question Box 

Q.— To take advantage of combination sales 
financed by one contract must both items be 
bought at the same time? 
A.— No. A customer who several months 
ago bought a refrigerator, for example, can 
come back and purchase another appliance 
and add it to the refrigerator contract, in 
this way taking advantage of the long ma- 
turity. 

Q.— Is it advisable for the user to finance 
the purchase of low-priced appliances? 
A.— Generally not. Because the fixed costs 
of credit investigation, accounting and han- 
dling are the same for a $25.00 balance as 
for a $150.00 balance and the service charge 
for the smaller balance must reflect these 
fixed costs. Hence the charge seems high to 
the small appliance buyer. 

Q.— What is the most economical way to 
finance the purchase of a low-priced appli- 
ance? 

^.— Lower priced items often can be in- 
cluded in a contract for a larger item, fi- 
nancing the combined balances as one 
transaction. 

Q.— In the case of appliances sold on the 
Limited Recourse Plan do dealers generally 
maintain the same interest in the customer 
after their four months liability? 
A.— Yes. Because friendly relations with 
satisfied users is the most prolific source of 
dealers' leads. 



They have a name for it 

In England, instalment buying is known as 
the "hire purchase" system. It is widely 
used although not as extensively as in this 
country. 

One of the reasons America leads the world 
in enjoyment of such conveniences as auto- 
mobiles, radios, electric household appli- 
ances, etc.. is that sound instalment buying 
enables almost everyone to purchase the 
new contrivances. Thus they can be manu- 
factured on a large scale and sold at reason- 
able prices. "As sales go up . . . prices come 
down." 




THE PHILOSOPHY OF 

"DEALER DAN" 



Most people knoiu what they want when 
they come in to buy— but it's up to you to 
show them hoiv they can buy without feel- 
ing the strain. C.I.'T.'s Budget Plan is the 
answer, of course. 

To insure the "outgo" of your merchandise 
—you've got to tell your customers how they 
may make purchases out of "in-come." 

In using the Limited Recourse Plan I find it 
smart never to "limit" my interest in a pui'- 
chaser throughout the duration of his con- 
tract. Satisfied friends mean good leads. 



C. I. T. CORPORATION • NEW YORK • CHICAGO • SAN FRANCISCO 



AUTO-RADIO NOISE 

— recognizing source or cause of radio noise 

— suggested cures for interference 



* SUCCESS of any auto radio 
installation is dependent upon the 
reduction of noise to an extremely 
low level, particularly when the set 
is used more than a few miles from 
the broadcasting stations. 

Before attempting to cure the 
noise it is desirable that the service- 
man spend a few minutes first in an 
effort to find out where the noise is 
being generated. 

In general there are two main 
sources of radio noise in all cars, ig- 
nition and generator — and both of 
these are prevalent only when the 
engine is running. Other noise pro- 
ducers may be loose wires, electrical 
gas gauges and thermometers, mo- 
tors on car heaters, bad electrical 
contacts in the body and chassis. 

Generator interference 

Generator interference is caused by 
a small amount of arcing at the 
brushes which is carried to the 
radio circuits by means of the auto 
wiring system. Its cure is accom- 
plished in the same manner as that 
of electrical motors in the home. A 
condenser with extremely short leads 
is connected across the generator 
output and ground. Usually a con- 
denser is sufficient although in some 
cases it may be necessary to clean 
the commutator with sandpaper (not 
emery) and reseat the brushes. This 
source of noise is easily ascertained 
— speed up the motor and shut oif 
the ignition. If the generator is 
causing the trouble, the noise will be 
heard as the motor coasts to a stop — 
ceasing of course, as soon as the en- 
gine has stopped tiirning. 

Ignition noise may enter the set 
either through the antenna circuit or 
the battery line. In cases where an 
external speaker is employed, its 
cable may be a pick-up circuit if un- 
shielded. Interference from the ig- 
nition system, naturall.y, will be heard 
only when the motor is running. It 
is usually heard in the form of rap- 
id clicks when the engine is idling 
which speed up and merge into a con- 
tinuous tone when the engine is ac- 
celerated. 

Reducing ignition noise 

Noise which comes in through 
other than the antenna system can 
often be sufficiently reduced by re- 
locating the speaker cable and the 



ammeter lead — first having discon- 
nected the antenna from the set. 

Peening of distributor rotor arm 
is suggested by E. H. Barry, Service 
Editor of Motor as a method of re- 
ducing ignition interference. To 
peen the rotor arm, clamp a piece of 
steel in a vise. Slide the rotor over 
this plate so that the plate is between 
the rotor arm and the bakelite rotor. 
Peen the end with a small machinist's 
hammer, extending it about .005 
inches. Great care must be taken 
not to crack the bakelite in perform- 
ing this operation. Likewise, make 
sure that the rotor does not strike 
the contacts in the distributor block. 
If a double rotor arm is used, each 
end must be peened. The interfer- 
ence noise should be reduced to a 
negligible amount by this operation. 

Should noise still be present, it is 
probably being conducted into the 
car by the oil windshield, or ther- 
mometer lines or even the steering 
column. Effectively grounding them 
to the dash will prevent these lines 
from carrying interference to the 
radio set. 

Noises from accessories 

Xoise from dome lights, electric 
gas gauges, etc., can best be found 
by connecting a condenser across 
them to ground or by disconnecting 
the circuit temporarily from the 
electric system of the Car. The con- 
denser for the gas gauge should be 



connected across the unit at the gas 
tank. Other positions for condensers 
may be : electric oil gauge, ammeter 
or ignition switch, clock, ignition 
coil, fuse block, fan motor, etc. 

When instructions are available 
telling where to use condensers in 
various make cars and where to make 
ground connections, these should first 
be carried out to tlie letter before at- 
tempting to remedy noise difficulties. 
Very often these routine suggestions 
will clear up all noise. 

Wlieel static 

There is a type of noise that is 
often difficult for the serviceman to 
find — but it can always be prevented 
by taking precautionary measures. 
Wheel or tire static is often notice- 
able when driving upon certain types 
of roads — particularly cement. In 
wet weather it disappears completely 
since it is caused by the accumula- 
tion of static electricity on the wheel 
which discharges through the axle 
grease to the car. Moisture on the 
rubber tire renders it a non-insula- 
tor so that only in dry weather can 
static electricity collect. 

Solution is the use of springs or 
static collectors inside the hub cap. 
Some of the 1937 cars are equipped 
with these springs. Much effort can 
be saved by installing these springs 
as a routine matter. 

This cause can be easily determined 
by tuning the set off a station. Speed 
up the car, then shut off the motor 
and disengage the clutch — if noise 
is present in the form of a roar or 
scratching noise, it is due to tire 
static. Of course, this test must be 
made on a dry day preferably on a 
cement (or a macadam) road. 

Cars using overhead antennas are 
(To page 61) 



COMMENTATOR WINS AWARD FROM WOMEN'S NATIONAL RAOIO COMMITTEE 




From the New Yorker 

"Now tune in on Boake Carter, Lily, and leave us alone." 



April, 1937 



25 



AHRACTIONS OF THE SHORT-WAVES 

Whole world is at customer's door through these magic channels 
With coming of static on BC band, short-wave listening grows better! 




Showing how the Electric Institute of Washington, D. C, used the spectrum 

below, drawn up by RADIO TODAY, as the central feature of an all-wave-radio 

window display. Dolls and flags indicated the nations of the world. 



FOREIGN-STATION DISPLAY 
BRINGS RESUITS 

* A very fine main window display 
which stressed the range of radio re- 
ception brought good results to the 
C. Niss & Sons Furniture Co., Mil- 
waukee, Wis. 

Each radio displayed was placed on 
a specially built, rounded platform 
with white covering. The background 
behind each radio was also rounded 
and very pleasing in effect. Behind 
each radio, and easily visible from the 
sidewalk, was the name of some far- 
away place. This indicated the out- 
of-the-way and distant places of the 
world which the radio owner could 
reach by buying one of these sets. 

Some of the places mentioned were 
Buenos Aires, Caracas, Havana, 
Mexico City, etc. This, of course, 
stimulated the imaginations of many 
and induced them to buy a new radio. 

Along the edges of the display back- 



grounds were also painted numerous 
musical notes which helped to carry 
out the idea that one can get radio 
music of quality from many parts of 
the world. 



WAR DRAMA BY S-W 
DIRECT FROM SPAIN 

* A new element of international 
drama has been introduced into 
short-wave listening as a result of 
the Spanish War, and the efforts of 
both Loyalists and Rebels to win 
favorable opinion in America. Sev- 
eral of these Spanish stations, such 
as EAQ No. 2, Madrid, are being re- 
ceived in America as loud as locals. 
Reports of battles, air-raids, attacks 
and counter-assaults make up the 
tragic continuity of these broadcasts, 
which would be intently followed by 
many American listeners if more 
only knew about them. 

The war has also opened many new 



stations in Spain, the International 
Short Wave Club in East Liverpool, 
Ohio, reports. ECNl, Barcelona, is 
on 6.99 mc. (42.88 meters) regularly, 
noon to 7.00 p.m., EST. PSUl at 
Barcelona is on Y.128 mc. (42.08) 
from 2:30 EST to 5:30 p.m. ECP2, 
"Radio P.O.U.M.," is on 7.143 mc. (42 
meters) between 1 :00 and 3 :30 a.m. 
EAH, General Union Workers' Sta- 
tion at Valleras, near Madrid, is on 
31.65 meters or 9.48 mc. irregularly 
now, 4:00 to 5:00 p.m. EASRl, 
"Habla Mariana," operated by the 
Loyalist fleet off Cartagena, was 
heard 3 :30 to 5 :30 p.m. once. 

PSUl, Barcelona, on 7.18 was 
heard 3 :50 to 4 :10 p.m. and said it 
was owned by United Socialist Party 
of Catalonia. SNU, Barcelona, on 
7.00 mc. was heard at 2 :00 p.m. 
EAPl, on 7.08, was heard at 5:00 
p.m. EDR4,. San Sebastian, is heard 
moving around on 6.535 mc, 6.565 
mc. and 6.583 mc. Heard on 6.54 mo. 
and broadcasts 4 :00 to 5 :05 p.m. 
now. EAJl, Barcelona, on 41.70 me- 
ters or 7.194 me. is heard daily 4:00 
to 5 :00 p.m. EDNEHY, Madrid, on 
10.07 mc. broadcasts daily now 3 :30 
to 5:30 p.m. EAQ, Madrid, on 9.68 
mc. is scheduled 5:15 to 9:30 p.m. 
daily and 1 :30 p.m. to 9 :30 p.m. Sat- 
urdays. 

SELECT 100 PROSPECTS 

* Philco dealers are enthusiasti- 
cally using a special "100-Club" di- 
rect-mail plan made available a few 
weeks ago. The plan, while utilizing 
the direct-mail principle, is different 
from the usual campaign in that spe- 
cial emphasis is placed upon only 100 
selected prospects, enabling the dealer 
to concentrate his efforts upon a few 
productive prospects instead of scat- 
tering his efforts over a wider area. 



There's Fascinating entertainment all along the whole radio spectrum. 



HIGH FIDELITY BROADCAST 



U. S. WEATHER REPORTS NORTH AMERICAN BROADCAST 




rrriyii 



J I I I I I 1 I r 



1000 ispol 

I I I I I I I I I I ni:_t 



f 

IL:_< 




Compiled by 



SCHEDULE OF SHORTWAVE 
NEWS BROADCASTS 



K.S.T. 
.T. Time) 
55 a.m. 
00 a.m. 



11.10 a.m. 



30 a.m. 
:00 p.m. 



SUNDAY 

City 
New York 
Schenectady 
New Tork 
Boston 
Cincinnati 
Chioagro 
Boston 
Schenectady 
Boston 



Frequency 

Megacycles 

21.52 

15.33 

17.78 

9.57 

6.06 

6.10 

9.57 

15.33 

6.04 



MONDAY Through FRIDAY 



7.00 a.m. 
7.25 a.m. 
7.55 a.m. 
8.15 a.m. 
9.40 a.m. 
9.55 a.m. 
10.00 a.m. 



12.00 noon 

12.10 p.m. 
12.25 p.m. 

1.45 p.m. 

4.30 p.m. 

5.00 p.m. 

6.00 p.m. 

6.00 p.m. 
6.30 p.m. 



11.00 p.m. 



11.30 p.m. 
6.30 p.m. 



7.00 a.m. 
7.25 a.m. 
7.55 a.m. 
8.15 a.m. 
9.55 a.m. 
10.00 a.m. 



12.00 noon 

12.10 p.m. 
12.25 p.m. 
12.30 p.m. 

1.45 p.m. 

4.30 p.m. 

5.00 p.m. 

6.00 p.m. 



6.10 p.m. 
6.30 p.m. 



11.00 p.m. 
11.30 p.m. 



Boston 

Schenectady 

New York 

Pittsburgh 

New York 

Schenectady 

Pittsburgh 

Boston 

New York 

Pittsburgh 

Boston 

Schenectady 

New York 

Boston 



Pittsbureli 
Boston 
New York 
Schenectady 
Boston 
New York 
Schenectady 
Pittsburgh 
Boston 
Schenectady 
New York 
New York 



SATURDAY 

Boston 

Schenectady 

New York 

Pittsburgh 

Schenectady 

Pittsburgh 

Cincinnati 

Boston 

New York 

Pittsburgh 

Boston 

Schenectady 

New York 

Cincinnati 

Boston 



Pittsburgh 
Boston 
New York 
Schenectady 
New York 
Boston 
New York 
Schenectady 
Pittsburgh 
Boston 
Schenectady 
New York 



9.57 

15.33 

17.78 

21.54 

21.52 

15.33 

15.21 

9.57 

17.78 

15.21 

9.57 

15.33 

17.78 

9.57 

11.79 

9.37 

15.21 

9.57 

6.10 

9.53 

9.57 

21.52 

9.53 

6.14 

9.57 

9.53 

6.10 

6.10 



9.57 

15.33 

17.78 

21.54 

15.33 

15.21 

6.06 

9.57 

21.52 

17.78 

15.21 

9.57 

15.33 

17.78 

6.06 

9.57 

11.79 

9.57 

15.21 

9.57 

6.10 

9.53 

21.52 

9.57 

6.10 

9.53 

6.14 

9.57 

9.53 

6.10 



News Commentators 



E.S.T. 
(N.Y. Time) 
10.00 p.m. 
10.45 p.m. 
11.00 p.m. 
11.30 p.m. 



City 
New Yorl^ 

Cincinnati 



Frequency 
Megacycles 
6.10 
6.12 
6.06 
6.10 



MID-PACIFIC ISLANDS BECOME NEWS CENTERS OF BROADCASTING 




The China Clipper, the new air links with New Zealand, and now the June 8 
eclipse of the sun bring the Pacific Ocean into the radio spotlight. Here's Mid- 
way Island, Pan American Airways base. 



MONDAY. 

7.45 a.m. 

9.45 a.m. 
10.30 a.m. 
12,15 p.m. 

2,00 p.m. 

5.00 p.m. 

6.45 p.m. 



6.45 p.m. 

7.30 p.m. 

7.45 p.m. 
11.00 p.m. 
11.30 p.m. 



WEDNESDAY and FRIDAY 



Cincinnati 
New York 
Chicago 
Cincinnati 
New York 
Cincinnati 
New York 
Pittsburgh 
Boston 
Schenectady 

New York 
Cincinnati 
Chicago 



6.06 

17.78 

21.52 

6.06 

15.27 

6.06 

6.10 

15.21 

9.57 

9.53 

9.53 

11.83 

6.06 

6.10 



TUESDAY and THURSDAY 



7.4 5 a.m. 

9.45 a.m. 
10.30 a.m. 
10.45 a.m. 

5.00 p.m. 

6.45 p.m. 



7.15 p.m. 

7,45 p,m. 
11,00 p,m. 
11,30 p.m. 



7.45 a.m. 

7.15 p.m. 

12.05 a.m. 



Cincinnati 
New York 

Cincinnati 

New York 
Pittsburgh 
Boston 
New York 

Cincinnati 
Chicago 

SATURDAY 

Cincinnati 
New York 
Cincinnati 



6.06 

11.83 

6.06 



BETTER SHORT-WAVE AHEAD 

* Within tlie next few months 
short-wave reception will be at its 
best. That summer is the best short- 
wave season is acknowledged by the 



experts. Why not push all-wave sets 
and antennas during this period? 
Since, on account of static, broadcast 
reception is poorer in the summer, it's 
only logical that the public should 
turn to the higher frequencies where 
the static is a minimum. And during 
the hot months the S-W static is even 
less than in the winter. 

THIS "WAVELENGTH CHART" 

* The chart helow, prepared hy 
R.-iDio Today, shows all the points at 
which iroadcast entertainment and 
news features come in on an "all- 
wave" receiver reaching from 100 
kilocycles to 72,000 Mlocycles (or 72 
megacycles, from the GreeTc ivord 
"mega" meaning "million"). 

Radio channels are designated by 
either wave-lengths (in meters) or 
frequencies (in hilocycles or mega- 
cycles). For any given channel the 
wavelength tnultiplied by the fre- 
quency (in Jcilocycles) alivays gives 
a constant figure — 300,000, the speed 
of radio or light, measured in l-ilo- 
meters per second. 



Show this wave-chart to your customers to guide them in 1937 listening 



INTERNATIONAL BROADCAST 



ULTRA-SHORT.WAVE 
EXPERIMENTAL 
BROADCAST and POLICE TELEVISION 




50,000 60,000 70, 



19 16 

METERS METERS 



METERS METERS 



METERS METERS 



NEW THINGS FROM THE MANUFACTURERS 



Oxford permag speakers 

■* Complete line of permanent mag- 
net dynamic speakers ranging from 3 
to 14 inches. 3-inch size for use in 
Bmall sets and inter phones. For P.A. 
use there is a P.M. speaker with a 6- 
inch cone housing for use with ex- 
ponential horns. Model XA22 is a 
new spun aluminum exponential horn. 
Oxford Tartak Radio Corp., 915 W. 
Van Buren St., Chicago, 111. — R.\dio 
Today. 

RCA farm radios 



in blue, green, red or brown Model 26 
—list ?29.95. Freed Mfg. Co., 44 W. 
18th St., New York. N. Y.— Radio 
Today. 




* Low priced battery type superhet 
receivers for use away from power 
lines. Available in 2 and 6-volt models. 
4-tube circuit tuning 530-1720 KC. 
Output of V2 watt. Large illuminated 
dial — AVC — permo dynamic speaker. 
Magnetite I.F. transformers, insuring 
factory alignment. Model 84BT for 2- 
volt, model 84BT-6 tor 6-volt operation 
includes synchronous vibrator power 
Bupply. RCA Mfg. Co., Front and 
Cooper Sts., Camden, N. J. — Radio To- 
day — see also advt. p. 22. 

Equafonic radio 

* Arm-chair type radio with cock- 
tail service. Non-directional distribu- 
tion of signals — speaker cone mounted 
horizontally with specific baffle above 
to bend the sound waves and project 
them in all directions. Grilles located 
on all four sides for equal volume in- 
tensity. Kadette Equafonic. Interna- 
tional Radio Corp., Ann Arbor, Mich. — 
Radio Today. 

6-tube portable superhet 




* Compact set designed for use 
while traveling, camping, cruising. 
Operates on AC and DC. Self-containei 
aerial — illuminated gold dial — tone 
control. Housed in fabrikoid covered 
case In black or brown. Airplane cloth 



AC-DC compact 




* 4-tube T.R.F. receiver for AC-DC 
operation. Tubes 540-1750 KC — large 
dial with streamlined pointer. Beam 
power output tube of 2 watts — dynamic 
speaker. Audio overload control. 
Available in walnut, ivory and black 
case. Model Q-157 list $14.95. Emer- 
son Radio & Phonograph Corp., Ill 
Eighth Ave., New York, N. Y. — Radio 
Today — see also advt. p. 3. 

Halson table sets 




* 8 models now presented by Hal- 
son in its 1938 line. Model T-5 illus- 
trated features "Tele-Tune" in a 5- 
tube AC-DC tuned RF chassis. Tunes 
170-550 meters — housed in walnut cab- 
inet — list $14.95. 

Model 25 is a 6-tube AC-DC superhet 
tuning 545-1750, 2300-7500 KC. Has 
full-vision dial with golden, metallic 
face. Tone control and pentode out- 
put tube. List $29.95. Other models 
are: 



Model 


135 


5-T 


AC 


2-band 


Model 


102 


6-T 


AC-DC 


2-band 


Model 


103 


7-T 


AC-DC 


2-band 


Model 


104 


6-T 


AC 


2-band 


Model 


106 


7-T 


AC 


2-band 


Model 


412 


8-T 


AC-DC 


3-band 



Halson Radio Mfg. Co.. 120 E. 16th St., 
New York, N. Y. — Radio Today. 

Arm chair radio 

•k Electric phonograph or phono- 
graph radio combination in an arm- 
chair design. Set is 6-tube AC-DC with 
2 bands. 10-inch dynamic speaker — 
tone control. Compartment for 100 
records. Supplied in walnut, maple or 
mahogany. Sonora Electric Phono- 
graph Co., Inc., 160 Varick St., New 
York, N. Y. — Radio Today — see also 
advt. p. 50. 

Crosley teletuning radio 




■*■ New Fiver model receivers fea- 
ture teletuning with a dial for rapid 
selection of stations. Five tube AC 
chassis — American and foreign recep- 
tion— 540-1720, 5800-15,400 KC. Tele- 
tuning model list $24.95. Without dial 
tuning — $19.99. A battery type set tun- 
ing 540-1725 KC. is available at $19.99. 
Crosley Radio Corp., 1329 Arlington 
St., Cincinnati, Ohio. — Radio Today. 

Line filters 

■k Line of low cost line filters. Ca- 
pacity type filters for use between plug 
and convenience outlet. Priced from 
25 cents to $1. Master Radio Labs., 
206 Broadway, New York, N. Y. — 
Radio Today. 

Webster-Chicago interfone 




* System of inter-office communica- 
tion — 2 types available. 2-station out- 
fit and multiple system accommodat- 
ing up to 10 stations. A number of 
simultaneous conversations may be 
carried on over any pair of stations 
with the multiple system. Both units 
housed in highly polished wood case 
with ebony finish. Model OCM illus- 
trated. Webster Chicago, 3825 W. 
Lake St., Chicago, III. — Radio Tooay — 
see also advt. p. 39. 



28 



Radio Today 




FREE — This attractive Island Display 
with order for Arvin Table Models — 
see your jobber for complete details 
about the Arvin No. 6 Deal at once. 



There are 11 table models in 
this advance showing of Arvin 
Radios. Starting with the smart 
little Arvin Phantom baby — a 
5-tube set at $19-95 up to 6 and 
8-tube models. The Island Dis- 
play provides a perfect setting 
for any 6 of them you select. It 
is painted in rich oil colors of 
maroon and contrasting buff 
tones. Actual size of display is 
50" high and 40" wide. 

Prices slightly higher in extreme 
South, Deftver and West. 



DOMINANT 



BigCSales News in Radio ... a few years ago it 
waslthe superheterodyne circuit. Today . . . it's 
the Arvia Phantom Fiker Circuit. Why? Simply 
because engineers have perfeaed a circuit that 
puts more punch in the new 1938 Arvin models 
. . . improves tone quality . . . filters out noise . . . 
and gives better all-over-the-dial reception. It's 
all due to the way the coils, condensers, trans- 
formers and tubes are knit together. And you well 
know, it's the circuit that makes a radio. 

The value of Arvin's big sales feature . . . the 
Phantom Filter Circuit . . . will be readily appre- 
ciated when you hear the new table models. And 



when you see the price tags, you'll realize the 
opportunity Arvins offer you for sales and profits. 

Arvin set out to design the "hottest" line of 
table radios in the industry — and did it! When 
you see the complete line announcement next 
month, you'll recognize instantly that Arvin con- 
soles are just as "hot." Yes — Arvin will be a hot 
line this year. See and hear the new Arvin table 
models — and order the Arvin No. 6 Deal from 
your jobber. 

NOBLITT- SPARKS INDUSTRIES, Inc., Columbus, 
Indiana A/so makers of Arvin Phantom Filter 

Car Radios and Arvin Hot Water Car Heaters. 



FOR ANNOUNCEMENT 



April, 1937 



29 



NEW THINGS 

Operadio paging system 



■/gm,f^f^f^'Bi 




m^^ 



* Amplified paging system for fac- 
tories, hotels, public buildings, etc. 
Complete with crystal mike, amplifier, 
permanent magnet dynamic speakers. 
Speakers connected in parallel with 
ordinary wire. Model 111. Operadio 
Mfg. Co., St. Charles, 111.— Radio To- 
DAT — see also advt. p. 43. 

Velotron mike 




* Base mounting velotron mike for 
paging systems, etc. Output of minus 
55 DB. Sixe 2 x 214 x V2 inches. Com- 
plete with 3-foot cable. Model SP — list 
$13.50. 

Wide angle pick-up microphone of 
modernistic design. Use of "direc- 
tional" fins widens angle of pick-up in 
front of mike and reduces pick-up 
from rear. Available with rotary on- 
off switch. Model WS— list $31. Bruno 
Laboratories, 30 W. 15th St., New 
York, N. Y. — Radio Today. 



Auto top aerial 




* Telescopic antenna for use with 
automobiles — requires no drilling of 
car top. Made of stainless steel and 
brass with chromium plate. Chieftain 
model F.M.— list $2.45. Ward Products 
Co., 1523 E. 45th St., Cleveland, Ohio— 
Radio Today — see also advt. p. 74. 

DeWald synchro-beam sets 

* Seven-tube table model with syn- 
chro-beam tuning, variable tone con- 
trol, and indirectly illuminated dial. 
Tunes 19-550 meters in 3 bands. 6%- 



inch dynamic speaker. Model 700. 
Housed in Bent-wood duo-tone walnut 
cabinet, 16% x 7% x 10 inches. 

Model 527 is a 5-tube superhet auto 
radio. Set mounts behind instrument 
panel. Iron-core antenna coil — vernier 
tuning — pentode power output. Stream- 
lined metal case. Pierce-Airo, Inc., 510 
Sixth Ave., New York, N. Y. — Radio 
Today — see also advt. p. 50. 

Auto remote controls 

* Complete line of auto radio dash 
panel needs for all popular cars. Other 
Stewart products are control housings, 
cable, and end fittings. A tool for cut- 
ting and attaching these parts is also 
available. F. W. Stewart Mfg. Corp.. 
340 W. Huron St., Chicago, 111.— Radio 
Today. 

Radoiek inter-office 
communicating system 



Hickok multi-meter 




* Master type 2-way system of com- 
munication. May be used with up to 
5 outlying stations. Remote stations 
call master by pushing call button. 
Master unit controls conversation — 
push button to talk. Radoiek Co., 601 
W. Randolph St., Chicago, 111. — Radio 
Today. 



Portable sound system 




■*■ 15-watt portable sound system 
with high-gain amplifier. Input chan- 
nels for mike and high-impedance 
phono pick-up. Supplied with crystal 
mike, stand and 25-ft. cable. Uses 
Magnavox high-fi 12-inch speaker with 
50-ft. cable. Tone control to match 
acoustics of surroundings. Waterproof 
carrying case houses all equipment. 
List $134.50. Electro-Acoustic Prod- 
ucts Co., Fort Wayne, Ind. — Radio 
Today. 

2-inch cathode ray tube 

■*• High-vacuum 2-inch cat-ray tube 
with 4 electrostatic deflection plates. 
Has octal base and 6.3 volt filament — 
interchangeable with 913. Plate volt- 
age 300 to 600. 7% inches overall. 
Type 24-XH— list $7.50. Allen B. Du- 
niont Labs., Inc., Upper Montclair, 
N. J. — Radio Today. 




* Infinite impedance voltmeter for 
radio set measurements — ranges 0/10/ 
50/250 volts. Employs potentiometer 
principle of voltage measurement and 
has self-contained power supply. Other 
ranges as follows: 0/10/50/250/500/ 
1000 volts at 1000 ohms/volt AC and 
DC; 0/1/5/50/500 AC-DC mils.; 5 re- 
sistance ranges from .05 ohms to 10 
megs. 5 capacity ranges from .0001 
to 200 mfd. Model 4900. Hickok Elec- 
trical Instrument Co., 10514 Dupont 
Ave., Cleveland, Ohio. — Radio Today. 

Comun-a-phone inter-phones 




■*■ Two - way intercommunicating 
system with amplifier at master sta- 
tion. Sub-station has 6%-inch speaker 
and signalling button. Pilot light and 
buzzer on master indicates station call- 
ing. List $49.50 with master and one 
remote station. Additional stations 
$10. Comun-a-phone Systems, Inc., 22 
Scott St., Newark, N. J. — Radio Today 
— see also advt. p. 76. 

Condenser kit for oscilloscope 

* Kit of 18 condensers for the 
Thordarson cathode ray oscilloscope. 
Units are of the proper capacity and 
voltage ratings and meet the close ca- 
pacity tolerances required. Aerovox 
Corp., 70 Washington St., Brooklyn, 
N. Y. — Radio Today — see also advt. 
p. 73. 

Centralab insulated resistor 




* Insulated type resistor having a 
ceramic jacket, providing a perfect seal 
against humidity. Uses standard Cen- 
tralab resistor element. Type 710 
rated at V2 watt. Available in 100 
ohms to 10 megs and R.M.A. color 
coded. Centralab, 900 E. Keefe Ave, 
Milwaukee, Wis. — Radio Today — see 
also advt. p. 56. 

(To page 34) 



30 



Radio Today 



Zenith Moves 

Into World's Largest Radio 

Factory on One Floor 







Reason . . . . 



Of all major radio manufacturers, Zenith enjoyed the greatest increase 
in public demand in 1935 — and again in 1936. (Zenith has been unable 
to fill its orders in full during any month since June, 1935.) 



But . . . . 



Zenith, even with its purchase of these enormous new facilities, pro- 
poses to continue its conservative policies — protecting the dealer's 
profits and time payment paper on Zenith Radios — making unnecessary, 
cut-rate advertising, dumps, excessive trade-in allowances, and other 
practices that endanger the dealer's investment. 

"America's Most Copied Radio . . . Again A Year Ahead" 

ZENITH RADIO CORPORATION, CHICAGO 



April, 1937 



31 



MONEY AT THE CROSS-ROADS 

What radio means to Farmer, from rural survey just completed by NBC 



* Money, and lots of it, is again 
being spent at the crossroads store. 
Cash farm income in 1936 totalled 
$7,850,000,000, as estimated by the 
United States Department of Agri- 
culture. This is the highest total 
for six years. It is 93 per cent of 
the 1930 figure, and nearly double 
the 1932 income. Rural business is 
now so strongly on the upgrade that 
the October dollar volume of general 
merchandise sales was actually 27 
per cent better than the 1929-1931 
level. 

Thirty-five million people live on 
farms and another twenty-five mil- 
lion reside in small rural communi- 
ties — a total of sixty million indi- 
viduals, comprising practically one- 
half of the Nation's consumers. 

Upsurge in radio interest 

With returning prosperity, exten- 
sion of power lines and development 
of windcharging apparatus, there has 
been an upsurge in the purchase of 
radio sets by rural families. Last 
year, in fact, hundreds of thousands 
of sets (both house-current and bat- 
tery-operated) were sold for farm and 
country use. 

Seeking a more comprehensive 
picture of radio's place in the rural 
market, the National Broadcasting 
Company recently retained Charles 
Morrow Wilson, well known author, 
to make a nation-wide observational 
study. For NBC Mr. Wilson visited 
farm families in 25 states. He lived 
with them, talked with them, photo- 
graphed them, and made copious 
notes of all he learned. He inter- 



viewed rural merchants and repre- 
sentative county agents. From these 
close human contacts he drew the 
conclusions which follow. 



armer 



like other foiki 



Mr. Wilson's comments are the re- 
actions of a man who has been 
trained as a student of rural life, a 
man with an educated marketing out- 
look. His observations suggest that 
the rural American is not only be- 
ing reached to an increasing degree 
by radio, but also that the farmer 
is being influenced by radio to an 
even greater extent than the city 
listener. 

Mr. Wilson found that the favorite 
programs of rural listeners include 
many of the same sponsored network 
programs which rank highest with 
the inilustrial and city population — 
evidence that the farmer does not be- 
long to a race apart, and that his 
tastes are becoming increasingly sim- 
ilar to those of the city dweller. But 
in addition the farmer has an espe- 
cially vital interest in radio, because 
it is his only means of close daily 
contact with authoritative national 
sources of agricultural information. 

The following conclusions present 
an approximate consensus of opinion 
in the 209 farm homes visited. This 
summary also takes account of the 
views of 41 representative county 
agricultural agents. 

1. Radio is the fastest-growing me- 
dium of farm entertainment at 
the present time. 

2. On the better type of farm, radio 




Zenith adds dist. mgrs. to its field sales staff: J. H. Souther, F. H. Strayer, 
C. H. Wilks, G. A. Lyons, J. H. Hickey, R. E. McGreevy and J. H. McKee. 



is building for itself a distinctive 
place in the routine of farm liv- 
ing. It has substantially moved 
back farm bedtime. 

3. Today radio has an outstandingly 
significant place in the problems 
of farm youth. 

4. The farm appetite for entertain- 
ment is pretty uniformly distrib- 
uted among all age groups. 

5 There is no one best type of farm 
radio program. Farm interests 
are broadened to a point where 
they are genuinely cosmopolitan. 

6. On the other hand, a great many 
widely known radio programs are 
definitely limited of rural appeal 
and merchandising value. 

7. Music is definitely the surest bet 
in valid radio entertainment for 
a rural audience. 

8. Creation of successful farm radio 
entertainment is a field of out- 
standing challenge. 

RADIO CALMS CHICKENS' NERVES 

* A new use for radio in the 
poultry house has been brought to 
light by Harold Weaver, manager of 
Braewood Farm in Locust Valley, 
L. I., N. T. At present a set is used 
in the "developing room" to maintain 
a constant background of music and 
speech — this has the effect of keeping 
the chickens quiet and when anyone 
enters the house they are not fright- 
ened as they are already accustomed 
to considerable noise. 

So successful has this experiment 
been in the developing room of this 
modern poultry farm, that the laying 
houses will soon be equipped with sets. 

For the wide-awake dealers, this is 
a new market for those old radio sets 
that customers have traded in or wish 
to get rid of. For this use tone qual- 
ity is unimportant — all that is needed 
is a set that will operate continuously 
for 12 to 15 hours a day. There are 
probably many poultry farms with 
electricity that could be sold on this 
idea. 

WINKING GIRL 

* Flasher display featuring 
"Miss Sylvania" winking her right 
eye and holding a couple of tubes, 
has been released by Hygrade Syl- 
vania Corp., through jobbers. Gad- 
get has tricky color and lighting 
and comes in a miniature size for 
counter use, also. 



32 



Radio Today 



NOW! PROFITS FOR YOU IN EVERY 




mcHARCER YOU SELL! 



^■pON RESTRICTIONS REIVIOVED 
/ANY DEALER CAN STOCK WINCHARGER! 

/ LIST PRICE WITH RADIO $17.50 /WITHOUT RftDlO $25! 

I/M INCREftSE 
IN FftCTORY PRICE! 

- ... u au II Q a.') 



THERE IS ONLY 
ONE GENUINE 
WINCHARGER 

Look for These Features, 

Six- Foot Albers Airfoil 
Propeller, Copper- 
Tipped and Copper- 
Sheathed 

Positive-Acting Auto- 
Type Brake 

Bali-Bearing Turntable 

Heavy 4- Leg Steel 
Tower 

Double-Brush Collec- 
tor Ring 

Famous Wincharger 
Generator 

Complete Instrument 
Panel 

Patented Speed 
Governor 

Extra Braces on 
Tower Feet 



fDeLUXE 



(PRICES APPLY ONLY IN U.S.A.) 




10-Foot Tower 
Available 

The genuine 6-Volt De 
Luxe Wincharger is also 
offered with a 10-foot 
tower for use where your cus- 
tomers need extra height to 
get above wind interference. 
Our 10-foot tower is made 
from extra heavy rail angle 
steel, safe to erect anywhere, 
and SAFE TO climb, 
C^ In severe tests this 

^ ~ Wincharger 10-foot 

tower withstood 800 
pounds pull at the 
top, proving it near- 
ly three times as 
strong as any other 
nationally adver- 
tised 10-foot charger 
tower. 



NOW you can use the 6- volt DeLuxe Wincharger to spur sales of all your farm radios! 
You can sell it to anybody, with or without farm radio, and make a profit oti every sale! 
All red tape— all complications— have been removed from the Wincharger merchandising 
plan. It's easy for you to sell this amazing invention which has revolutionized farm radio 
in the last two years! And it's easy for your customers to buy! 

Millions of Ads to Help Your Selling! 

More than eighteen million ads have carried the story of 
6-volt Wincharger to readers of leading national farm 
papers this year. During the balance of 1937 this adver- 
tising campaign will be greatly expanded to include lead- 
ing state farm papers as well as displays at fairs and other 
farm gatherings. Wincharger is spending thousands of 
dollars to make it easier for you to sell 
Winchargers and farm radios. 



Free Circulars Printed 
with Your Name 

Send us the names of your radio prospects and we'll mail them 
FREE OF ALL EXPENSE TO YOU, this bright, strong-selling, 
two-color circular with your name and address printed on every 
one ! Wincharger is willing to spend money to help you make money I 





ff0S0i^^^ 






Wincharger Cuts Out Radio Interference! 

Wincharger engineers, after months of research and experiment, have perfected a 
device which eliminates all radio interference in the broadcast band and reduces 
short wa\e interference to a minimum. This device is exclusive with Wincharger, and 
will be furnished free to any of your customers who are experiencing interference 
from Wincharger! 



Speed radio sales and build profits with the genuine 6-volt DeLuxe Win- 
charger! No other wind-driven generator can offer you all Wincharger's 
advantages! No other is no^ bringing modern radio reception to more than 
500,000 listeners! Order direct from the factory today! No Coupons! — No 
Red Tape! — No Complications! 



WINCHARGER CORPORATION 

SIOUX CITY, IOWA 

WORLD'S LARGEST l/IAKERS OF WIND-DRIVEN GENERATING EQUIPMENT 



NEW THINGS 



Knight communicator 




:^ J^i. 



•k Recent addition to Allied's sound 
dept. are 3 interfone systems. 2-unit, 
master and multiple types are avail- 
able. Illustrated is the master system, 
whicli will handle up to 4 remote sta- 
tions. Amplifier using 3 tubes housed 
in master unit. Sub-stations consist 
of a speaker unit and call switch. 
Housed in walnut cabinets. Allied 
Radio Corp., 853 W. Jackson Blvd., 
Chicago, 111. — Radio Todat. 



Bell sound system 




* 20-watt portable system with 
gain of 112 DB. Frequency response 
within 2 DB from 35-10,000 cycles. 
Dual channel input. Crystal mike — 
dual speakers with infinite bafile. Tone 
control. Carried in 2 compact cases 
covered in black Keratol. Type PA-4-C. 
Bell Sound Systems, Inc., 61 E. Good- 
ale. St., Columbus, Ohio — Radio Today. 

Oscillograph-wobbulotor 




• Complete oscillograph with 913 
cat-ray tube. Thyratron linear sweep 
amplifier— 15-35,000 cycles. Horizontal 
and vertical amplifiers. Electronic 
wobbulator variable from to 55 KC. 
Synchronising lock control. Beam ad- 
justment, focusing, intensity controls. 
Weight only 13 pounds— 13% x 9% x 8 
inches. Model 77. Triumph Mfg. Co 
4017 W. Lake St., Chicago, 111.— Radio 
Today — see also advt. p. 55. 



G-E auto aerials 

* Four types of antennas for auto 
radios. "Top-flo" (KA-20) is held in 
position by rubber suction cups that 
are cemented in place. "Hinge-rod" 
(KA-10) attaches at the front door 
hinge. "Fish pole" (KA-30) is fastened 
to rear bumper. "Double hairpin" 
(KA-40) is a rubber-covered under car 
aerial. List $3.15 to $4. General Elec- 
tric Co., 1285 Boston Ave., Bridgeport, 
Conn. — Radio Today. 

Midget R.F. relay 

* Radio frequency relay for an- 
tenna switch-over and other similar 
uses. Midget size with 3-inch square 
base. Micalax insulating base an& 
cross arm — available in 4 and 15 amp. 
sizes for 6-volt DC and 110 AC opera- 
tion. Double pole double throw con- 
tacts. Ward Leonard Electric Co., Mt. 
Ver.non, N. Y. — Radio Today. 

Vari-volt transformer 



Recording amplifier 




■*• Variable voltage transformer for 
the serviceman to use in checking set 
at normal and abnormal voltages. 
Supplies 0-256 volts in 2-volt steps and 
0-128 volts in 1-volt steps. Rating 250 
watts maximum. Halldorson Co., 4500 
Ravenswood Ave., Chicago, 111. — Radio 
Today. 

Rack and panel sound system 




* Co-ordinated sound system de- 
signed for factories, schools, churches, 
etc. Permits personal calling or mass 
announcements. Will rebroadcast radio 
programs and reproduce phonograph 
recordings. Operates from 110 AC. 
Wholesale Radio Service Co., 100 Sixth 
Ave., New York, N. Y. — Radio Today. 

Handset 

* Telephone type handset with 
crystal microphone — designed for use 
at voice frequencies. Magnetic type 
receiver. Moulded in a 1-piece unit. 
Turner Co., Cedar Rapids, Iowa. — 
Radio Today. 




* High - gain resistance coupled 
speech recording amplifier. Has low 
and high-pass filters for tone regula- 
tion. High and low impedance input — 
output for 6-ohm speaker or 15 ohm 
cutting head. Entire outfit consists of 
velocity mike, speaker, mike stand, 
carrying case and connecting cables. 
Universal Microphone Co., Inglewood, 
Calif. — Radio Today. 

RCA aerodynamic mike 

* Dynamic type of microphone — 
streamlined. May be operated up to 
1000 feet from amplifier — not affected 




by wind or weather. Shielded from 
RF and AF fields. Requires no ex- 
ternal excitation. Operating level 
minus 69 DB. Frequency range 100- 
6000 cycles. Net weight 1%, pounds. 
Model MI-6226 — list, less stand, $26.50. 
RCA Mfg. Co., Front and Cooper Sts., 
Camden, N. J. — Radio Today. 



Speaker units for interphones 

■*■ Five and six-inch Nokoil speak- 
ers for use in intercommunicating sys- 
tems. Speaker is used as both repro- 
ducer and pick-up. Cabinet available 
to house speakers. Wright-DeCoster, 
Inc., 2233 University Ave., St. Paul, 
Minn. — Radio Today — see also advt. 
p. 76. 



Heavy-duty aerial 



* All-wave antenna for use where 
severe weather and wind conditions 
are encountered. Uses 60-feet 7-strand 
No. 18 phosphor bronze wire for pick- 
up. Additional 50 feet supplied for 
supporting aerial. 100 feet of special 
transmission line with extra-heavy 
rubber covering. Furnished with 4 
8-inch glass insulators and 4 8-incli 
stand-off insulators. No. 45-1242 — Hat 
$32.50. Philco Radio & Television 
Corp., Tioga & C Sts., Philadelphia, 
Pa. — Radio Today. 



34 



Radio Today 




April, 1937 



35 



NEW THINGS 




Universal auto-radio 
control head 

* Adjustable type of control head 
to fit all cars and all radios. Volume 
control and tuning control mounted 
on slotted piece — can be moved to fit 
holes of any spacing. Fits without 
drilling and filing. Dial pointer driven 
by small belt from tuning shaft — illu- 
minated full-vision dial. Escutcheons 
to match all 1935-6-7 cars. Star Ma- 
chine Mfrs., Inc., 1371 E. Bay Ave., 
Bronx, N. Y. — Radio Tod.w — see also 
advt. p. 65. 

General Electric tubes 

* New line of G-E tubes is com- 
prised of 103 glass types and 19 metal. 
Both the metal and glass tubes are 
packed in sealed tamper-proof cartons. 
The glass line includes both the octal 
and old type glass. Obsolete tubes not 
included — but tubes such as 01-A. 
71-A, 11-A, X-99 are in the line, since 
there is considerable replacement ac- 
tivity in these types. General Electric 
Co., 1285 Boston Ave., Bridgeport, 
Conn. — Radio Today. 

Clarion auto sets 




* New auto radio line is comprised 
of 12 models. Five 6-tube, five 7-tube, 
two 8-tube models for all makes of 
automobiles. List $34.95 to $69.95. 
Clarion Corp., 35 E. Wacker St., Chi- 
cago, 111. — Radio Today — see also advt. 
p. 1. 

Thordarson oscilloscope kit 

* Low cost cat-ray oscilloscope kit 
for the serviceman. Completely de- 
signed by Thordarson engineers. Uses 
standard parts mostly. Features linear 
sweep circuit, vertical and horizontal 
amplifiers. Uses new type 913 1-inch 
tube. Thordarson Electric Mfg. Co., 
500 W. Huron St., Chicago, 111.— Radio 
Today. — see also advt. p. 59. 

Streamlined amplifier 

* 20-watt amplifier with 122 DB 
gain. Dual input channel for high- 
impedance mikes. Frequency response 
with 21/2 DB from 50-12,000 cycles. 
6L6 beam power output tubes. Output 



impedance of 500 ohms. Tone control 
and 6E5 overload indicator tube. Cab- 
inet of heavy gauge steel with rounded 
corners. Model 20-C— list $62. United 
Sound Engineering Co., St. Paul, Minn. 
— Radio Today. — see also advt. p. 73. 

Tapped volume controls 

* Assortment of 14 tapped con- 
trols taking care of past and present 
production of sets. Permit immediate 
replacement of any defective control 
with full assurance that total resist- 
ance and taps satisfactorily match orig- 
inal units. Clarostat Mfg. Co., Inc.. 
285 N. 6th St., Brooklyn, N. Y.— Radio 
Today. — see also advt. p. 75. 

Midget x-mitting condensers 

■*• Line of small variable con- 
densers for medium powered transmit- 
ters. Single-hole or stand-off insula- 
tor mounting. Available In 35, 50, 75 
mfd. sizes— 2000 volt peak. 100 mfd. 
at 1250 volt peak. Bud Mfg. Co., 1937 
E. 55th St., Cleveland, Ohio — Radio 
Today. 

Eria receivers 




* 5-tube dual band table model 
superhet — tunes 540-1720. 2300-6300 
KC. AC operated — 4 watts output. Six 
inch dynamic speaker — tone control. 
Large rectangular illuminated dial. 
Sensitivity of 10 microvolts on broad- 
cast band". Model 72A-T— list $19.95. 




All-wave console with 9 metal and 
2 glass tubes. Power output of 9 watts. 
12-inch dynamic speaker. Tunes 535- 
1720, 1680-5700, 555-18,500 KC. Call 
letters of selected stations indicated 
on dial. Set has automatic frequency 
control — push-pull ouitput tubes. Model 
76AC— list $89.95. Electrical Research 
Laboratories, Inc., 2222 Diversey Pky., 
Chicago, 111. — Radio Today. 

Universal line filter 

* Line filter with multi-section ca- 
pacitor blocks and dual line chokes. 
Choice of condensers permits match- 



ing of filter to individual conditions. 
Has 4 condensers each of .1, .25, .5 mfd. 
at 220 volts AC. Housed in steel ease 
with knock-outs. 5 to 30 amp. sizes. 
Model 7819 5 amps.— list $15.50. J. W. 
Miller Co., 5917 S. Main St., Los 
Angeles, Calif. — Radio Today. 

Million test instruments 




* New Million instruments have 
been completely restyled — feature new 
panel indicator escutcheons and illu- 
minated meters. Available as multi- 
meters, tube checkers, and set analyz- 
ers. Million Radio & Television Labs., 
397 W. Superior St., Chicago, 111.— 
Radio Today — see also advt. p. 74. 

Solar razor interference filter 




* Capacitative-inductive type of fil- 
ter to overcome interference produced 
by electric razors. Inserted between 
plug and convenience outlet. Elim-o- 
stat type AE. Solar Mfg. Co., 599 
Broadway, New York, N. Y. — Radio 
ToiiAY — see also advt. p. 67. 

Tobe Xmitting condenser 

* Oil-processed 2000 -working -volt 
condenser for transmitter and ampli- 
fier equipment. Sealed in metal hous- 
ing with wet process insulators 
mounted on top. Tobe Blue Ribbon 
Micranol condenser. Tobe Deutsch- 
mann Corp., Canton, Mass. — Radio 
Today'. 

Variac transformer 

* Continuously variable auto trans- 
former for supplying 0-135 volts from 
a 115-volt line. Improved type 200-B 
Variac will now supply 1-1% amps on 
60 cycles. Table or panel mountings. 
Ideal for testing sets at voltages above 
and below line voltage and for correct- 
ing abnormal line voltages. List $10. 
General Radio Co., 30 State St., Cam- 
bridge, Mass. 

■*■ Through an error on the part 
of Radio Today-, the price of the Amer- 
ican Carrier-Call intercommunicating 
telephone was incorrectly listed on 
page 32 of the March issue. The 
Carrier-Call instruments are correctly 
priced at $79.50 per pair. 



36 



Radio Today 



THERE^STILLTIME«;^^ 
^ ^RAYTHEON CONTEST !> 




• Piaure shows Mr. Eddie Riedel, 
Raytheon General Sales Maasi^er, 
and Mr. £arl Dietrich, Manager of 



miJfMcJ^f 



OR ^600.00 CASH-FIRST PRIZE 

ALSO 500 OTHER FREE PRIZES 

There is still time to enter! The contest does not close until May 1. It is the easiest con- 
test you ever saw. All you need to do is just write a sentence. There are going to be 500 
winners of valuable prizes! And the winner of the V-8 Truck will be personally adver- 
tised in the Saturday Evening Post in a Raytheon Advertisement! 
Ask your jobber today for an entry blank! 




April, 1937 



a7 




New multi-station system by . Carrier-Call allows user to select any one of 5 
other stations, talk without others hearing. "Carrier-Eye" used for busy signal. 



PLUGGING INTERCOMMUNICATORS 

— gadgets demonstrated, displayed profitably 

— outside selling helps move new phones 



• QUIETLY CLICKING in 
hundreds of offices are the new 
wonder-gadgets of the radio biz, in- 
tercommunicators. Clicks of an- 
other sort are heard in the cash reg- 
isters of many radio dealers. 

As sales plans for the inter-room 
communicators get themselves or- 
ganized, radio men stock the new 
merchandise and outline their meth- 
ods for plugging this new adjunct 
to the radio-electrical set-up. 

Inter-phones are being advertised 
nationally, and in some ways the 
popular demand is ahead of dealer 
activity. Radio merchants who have 
not fallen for the gadgets are now 
willing because they have had 
enough inquiries to support promo- 
tion. 

7937 pushover 

N. Goldman, of the Goldman 
Electric Co., New Eoohelle, N. Y., is 
an example of a dealer who noticed 
the demand before he had the mer- 
chandise on his iloors. Local people 
noted the new features of the sys- 
tems, thought that Goldman's was the 
logical place to find them. 

Persons who are prospects for in- 
tercommunicating systems have 
turned out, naturally, to be the more 
sjibstantial types of customers. Of- 
fice executives, hotel managers, own- 



ers of elaborate homes, dentists and 
physicians are among typical pros- 
pects and nearly all of them either 
have the cash or are certainly OK 
credit risks. 

This has been one of the factors 
which attract radio dealers into the 
field. Also, many of the sales are 
being made to establishments such as 
hospitals, libraries, newspapers, 
schools, etc., where the question of 
payment is not something for sales- 
men to be worried about. 



tummer 



profit 



Radio outlets have discovered that 
there are usually a dozen or so good 
prospects in the same block. Any 
store which has occasion for office- 
to-cashier, floor-to-floor, or inter-de- 
partment communication, should re- 
spond to demonstration, particularly 
if it is a neighbor. 

For those who note a lull-time in 
summer radio selling, the new loud- 
speaking items have their points. 
Unlike other fill-in merchandise 
plugged from May to August, in- 
tercommunicating systems are not 
limited in their appeal; in fact, many 
extra prospects for them show up in 
summer months. Summer resorts, 
night clubs and beach establishments 
are among the newcomers to prospect 
lists. 



One sales course which dealers 
seem inclined to follow is to start 
with lists of names already on their 
records. These are checked through 
with the idea of selecting all those 
prospects in any way connected with 
spots where interphones could be 
used. 

Where office executives or owners 
of big homes are themselves old cus- 
tomers, the sales plans are easy to 
make. And when old customers are 
employees at offices where the sys- 
tems can be used, they can often 
furnish invaluable leads as to where 
and how their employers should be 
approached. 



Outside angle 



Due to the fact that this market 
is one of the least-worked in the 
radio field, the use of special outside 
salesmen has been recommended. 
Even if these gents start out from 
the shop with a list of appointments 
and hot prospects, it has been found 
that one call leads to another. 
Whether it's in the residence field or 
in the office section, a smart sales- 
man will make friends and pick up 
leads as he goes along, when he's got 
this type of merchandise. 

Eew items can be as dramatically 
demonstrated as these inter-room 
talkers. Of course dealers keep a 
system installed in their stores so 
that a demonstration can be the first 
move when an inquiry is made. In 
such cases, dealers are encouraged 
to use as many units as possible, 
rather than exhibiting the simplest 
installation that can be set up. 

Trick demos 

When the gadgets are being dem- 
onstrated, it seems discreet to have 
a series of sales paragraphs worked 
out for use while speaking through 
the inter-phones. Earlier in the 
game, salesmen were apt to show ofi 
the instruments by reciting num- 
bers or letters of the alphabet. But 
such sentences may as well be used 
to describe the features and advan- 
tages of the merchandise. Naturally, 
the prospect should also be encour- 
aged to test his own voice through 
the system. 

For window displays, many dealers 
favor photographs of office or home 
situations, with remarks of the sub- 
jects lettered in as in comic strips. 
Blueprints of office floors, with lights 
behind them and with intercommuni- 
cating systems shown in colors, alse 
make effective window stoppers. 



38 



Radio Today 



THESE 
"INTER- 
COM" 
SYSTEMS 

Sell on 

Sight 



PLASTIC CASES. 

Beautiful designs. . . 
any surroundings. . . 
Competitive prices. . 
dealers who know. 



OXS — Inter-Commun- 
icating System . . . two 
stations employing one 
amplifier. 

OXC — Inter-Commun- 
icating System . . . con- 
sisting 1 Master Station 
and up to 10 Outlying 
Stations. 



MODEL OCM 




...CHOICE OF COLORS 

. Colors to harmonize with 
Sparkling performance. . . . 
. . The natural choice of 



OC-2 — Inter-Commun- 
icating System for two- 
station inter-communi- 
cating. 

OCM — Inter-Commun- 
icating System for any 
number of stations up 
to 10. Each station can 
talk to each other station. 



THIS 12-WATTER IS 
BREAKING ALL RECORDS 



MODEL PA-712 




Portable, carried in one case . . . Two Speakers 
. . . Crystal Microphone . . . Two Electronic High 
Gain Inputs for Crystal, Velocity, Velotron and 
Phono input for dual mixing. . . . Suitable for 
audiences indoors to 1,500 people. 



Sound Profits 

2VifAfAe BIG' 



More and more dealers are turning to sound. Right 
now is the time to get started, get set before the Spring- 
Summer buying season. . . . Investigate the BIG 3 : 

/l \ "UP-TO-THE-MINUTE" MERCHANDISE — 

\ ^ / A completely new line with all the latest improvements 
and many exclusive Webster-Chicago features. It is cor- 
rectly attuned to market requirements, priced to sell in 
real volume. 



(2) 



(3) 



BACKED BY TWELVE YEARS' EXPERIENCE IN 
THE SOUND FIELD — Webster-Chicago has been in 
the sound business since it started. Webster-Chicago 
installations with years of satisfactory service are to be 
found everywhere. Highest quality maintained by large 
staff of engineers. . . . Full R.M.A. guarantee on every 
product. 

POWERFUL DEALER HELPS ASSURE RAPID 
TURNOVER — The dealer who sells the Webster- 
Chicago line has the advantage of a wide assortment of 
dealer helps designed to meet local conditions and open 
doors. With these helps the aggressive dealer can liter- 
ally "go to town." 



NEW 



1937 CATALOG — Ready now ... 16 

pages of the latest in P.A. Systems, 
Sound Equipment and Accessories. It's 
FREE— Use Coupon. 



Webster-Chicago 



NOTICE TO DEALERS 

WEBSTER-CHICAGO 

Si22 Bloomingdale Avenue, Chicago, III. 

Gentlemen : 

Without obligation please send me 

□ New 1937 Catalog. 

□ Information on Inter-Communication Systems. 

□ Information on Model PA-712. 



• Fully 
Licensed 

• Strict Dealer 
Plan 

• Time Payment 
Plan 



Name 
Address 
City 



April, 1937 



39 



All the World's 





hborhood- 

Thanks to Radio! 






GREAT BRITAIN'S neighbors all 
over the world will tune in on 
the Coronation. They will hear the 
sound of tramping feet, hoof-beats, the 
wheels of the royal coach, from Buck- 
ingham Palace to Westminster Abbey 
and back again ... bands playing ... the 
rattle of sabres . . . the cheers and re- 
marks of millions of onlookers . . . the 
service in the Abbey... and a running- 
fire description from the lips of skilled 
commentators. 

NBC's picked staff will tell the story, 
using microphones and transmission 
equipment built by RCA Victor. RCA 
Communications will speed the de- 
scription across the Atlantic. NBC's 
Red and Blue Networks will carry it 
into millions of American homes,where 



RCA Victor radios will reproduce it 
with faithful accuracy. While this is 
going on, RCA Communications will 
also be sending photographs of the 
procession across the Atlantic, and you 
can see the pictures in your afternoon 
paper while the parade is still actually 
going on in London! 

In today's world -neighborhood of 
radio, the RCA Victor dealer occupies 
an outstanding position. He connects 
the RCA family of radio services with 
25 million families of radio patrons. He 
shares the prestige of the only organi- 
zation active in every branch of radio. 
His merchandise embodies the complete 
range of actual radio experience . . . from 
microphone to receiving set . . . expressed 
in the phrase "RCA all the way!" 



Listen to "The Magic Key" every Sunday, 2 to ^ p. m., E. S. T., on NBC Blue Network 



RCA MANUFACTURING CO., INC. RCA INSTITUTES, INC. 
RCA COMMUNICATIONS, INC. RADIOMARINE CORP. OF AMERICA 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING CO. 



RADIO CORPORATION 

OF AMERICA* Radio City.NewYork 

Everything in radio for service in 
Communications . . . Broadcasting . . . Reception 



All the World s a Neighborhood- 

Thanks to Radio! 




GREAT BRITAIN'S neighbors all 
over the world will tune in on 
the Coronation. They will hear the 
sound of tramping feet, hoof-beats, the 
wheels of the royal coach, from Buck- 
ingham Palace to Westminster Abbey 
and back again ... bands playing ... the 
rattle of sabres . . . the cheers and re- 
marks of millions of onlookers . . . the 
service in the Abbey... and a running- 
fire description from the lips of skilled 
commentators. 

NBC's picked staff will tell the story, 
using microphones and transmission 
equipment built by RCA Victor. RCA 
Communications will speed the de- 
scription across the Atlantic. NBC's 
Red and Blue Networks will carry it 
into millions of American homes, where 



RCA Victor radios will reproduce it 
with faithful accuracy. While this is 
going on, RCA Communications will 
also be sending photographs of the 
procession across the Atlantic, and you 
can see the pictures in your afternoon 
paper while the parade is still actually 
going on in London! 

In today's world -neighborhood of 
radio, the RCA Victor dealer occupies 
an outstanding position. He connects 
the RCA family of radio services with 
25 million families of radio patrons. He 
shares the prestige of the only organi- 
zation active in every branch of radio. 
His merchandise embodies the complete 
range of actual radio experience . . . from 
microphone to receiving set. ..expressed 
in the phrase "RCA all the way!" 



Listen to "The Magic Key" every Sunday, 2/03/1. '"■' ^' ^- ■'"•' "" f^BC Blue Network 



RCA MANUFACTURING CO., INC. RCA INSTITUTES, INC. 
RCA COMMUNICATIONS, INC. RADIOMARINE CORP. OF AMERICA 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING CO. 



RADIO CORPORATION 

OF AMERICA- Radio City, New York 

Everything in radio for service in 
Communications . . . Broadcasting . . . Reception 



SOUND SALES WIDEN 

— spring has a bearing on the business 

— more names added to prospect lists 



SYNCHRO-OPERA 

* It's been found that many- 
pieced orchestral effects, as well as 
maxiy-voiced choral ones, can be put 
on sound fihn and used again and 
again in connection with opera per- 
formances. 

In this way you can get a small 
group of artists to go through the mo- 
tions of an opera, but with the sound- 
film to supplement them, get the 
effect of a huge company. Of course 
the voices and instruments of the 
visible artists have to be synchronized 
with what the sound system repro- 
duces. 

Synchro-opera, it's called, and it's 
the idea of an American conductor, 
Vladimir Shavitch. He recently con- 
vinced the musical experts in Mos- 
cow that the thing was OK, and that 
it was the ideal way to bring opera 
to the masses without dragging along 
a big orchestra and chorus. 

If the idea should click in Amer- 
ica, it appears to have enormous sig- 
nificance for all those in the sound 
business. 

ADD FOX FARMS 

* Latest and most curious place 
to use microphones has been located 
by the sharp-eyed gentlemen of the 
Brush Development Co. They've been 
installed on a fox farm, in "nest 
houses" where the foxes are born. 

It is a problem, in fox breeding, to 
prevent the young from being kiUed 
before an attendant arrives. So small 



mikes were put in the nests, to pick 
up disturbances and transmit them to 
a centrally stationed attendant. In 
this way the keeper could check on a 
lot of nests at the same time, and 
eificiently protect the young animals. 

TOURISTS' CABINS PROSPECT 
FOR SOUND 

* Groups of tourists' cabins along 
motoring highways, bid fair to be- 
come a new prospect of sound equip- 
ment this year. A few proprietors 
of these overnight wayside cara- 
vansaries have already experimented 
with sound circuits with such success, 
that "sound" or "radio in every 
cabin" may soon become a standard 
requirement of the better-class stop- 
ping places. 

The loudspeaker installed in each 
cabin is used for radio music in the 
early part of the evening. Later it 
can be used to make announcements. 
And when separate circuits are run 
to each cabin, the speaker can be 
used to waken at dawn any unhappy 
itinerants who leave word "at the 
front cabin" that they want to get 
started early. 

SELLING SOUND THROUGH JOBBERS 

* "A week or so ago, one of our 
dealers from out of town dropped in 
to see us. We were awfully glad he 
did, because we like to meet the users 
of our products and discuss our mu- 
tual problems," explains Albert E. 



NOTE THAT SIGN AND SPEAKER EQUIPMENT ARE ALL ON A TRAILER 




Kahn, president of Electro-Voice 
Mfg. Co., South Bend, Ind. 

"It was a very pleasant visit. He 
seemed a little perturbed at first, be- 
cause we declined to extend the job- 
ber's discoimt to him. 'Why,' he asked, 
with every justification, 'should the 
jobber make a profit when I can just 
as well order direct from you?' 

"We explained: That, first of all, 
it was an established policy which 
was proved sound after seven years 
of manufacturing microphones. 

"Selling costs form a definite part of 
the -price paid by the dealer, whether 
he buys from a jobber or direct 
from the factorj'. It is obvious that 
it costs the factory much less to reach 
several hundred jobbers than thou- 
sands of dealers. Of course, a factory 
cannot sell both the distributing trade 
and direct, for, as the old saying 
goes, 'You cannot carry water on both 
shoulders.' 

Jobber^ s wider assortment 

"The jobber, quite naturally, can 
carry a wider assortment to take care 
of individual needs than is practical 
for the dealer. The jobber can sup- 
ply the correct instrument from stock, 
eliminating delay. This is worth 
something. 

"In any industry, particularly ours, 
it is desirable to have several checks 
on any product. We believe that the 
legitimate manufacturer is more par- 
ticular than the jobber; the jobber 
more than the dealer; and the dealer 
more critical than the ultimate user. 
It is largely because of this that the 
jobber carries a superior brand of 
merchandise than is sold direct. He 
gets into a lot of trouble if he doesn't. 



Replacements 



FLEXIBILITY FIRST was the sales theory of John Thomas, New RocheUe, 
N. Y., when he made this sound outfit adaptable to all types of outdoor events. 



"A distributor has close contact 
with the factory and has recourse be- 
cause of any failure of a product. He- 
placements are usually made imme- 
diately. There is no delay or un- 
pleasantness that often occurs when a 
factory deals direct with thousands 
of individuals. 

"A volume production is necessary 
to the manufacturer. With a quality 
product, the right jobbing setup will 
provide far steadier and greater vol- 
ume than any other method. This not 
only results in lower dealer cost but 
makes it possible to provide engineer- 
ing and tools that will turn out a 
constantly better product at a still 
lower price. 

"When we concluded our sermon, 
the dealer seemed very much in ac- 
cord with our ideas. Anyway, he gave 
us a nice order to be shipped through 
his jobber and everybody was happy." 



42 



Radio Today 




MANUFACTURING COMPANY 
ST. CHARLES • ILLINOIS 

April, 1937 



New Catalog 
Describes NEW LINE 



MAIL COUPON 



Operadlo Manufacturing Company/ Department R4T, St. Cfiarles, Illinois 

■ Pleose send me your NEW 1937 llluslroted Catalog describing the COMPLETE § 
Operodio Profit line for 1937. 

• Nome ' 

■ Name of Firm ■ 

g Kind of Business _ f 

_ Street Address _ 

City - Stole 

■ My Jobber is 

B Address of Jobber ■ 

43 



Model 
Chassis 



I.F. 
Peak 



Continued fro m 

March 
RADIO TODAY 

GENERAL 
MOTORS* 
"Dayfan" 

SIA, SIB 175 

S2A. S2B 175 

S3 A, S3B 175 

S4A, S4B 175 

S9A, S9B 175 

SIOA. SlOB 175 

GILFILLAN* 

5 

5-C, 5-D 175 

5-M, 5-T 175 

5-X 450 

6-C, 6-T 262.5 

7- A 175 

8-A, 8-C 262.5 

8-T, 8-X 262.5 

32 175 

34 450 

35 175 
41 175 
47 262.5 
50 262.5 
52-A 460 
53-A 465 
54-A 460 
55-A, 55-B 450 
62-B, 62-X 175 
63-B, 63-X 460 
67-A 252.5 
76-A 460 
77-A 460 
77A 252.5 
78-B. 78-X 460 
87 262.5 
87-A 252.5 
96-B, 96-X 460 
97-B, 97-X 460 
116-B, 116-X 460 
117-B, 117-X 460 
200 175 
250 175 
510. 510T 175 
515 460 
520 175 
521T 460 
525 460 
615 262.5 
625 262.5 
700 175 
711T 175 
715 460 
725 460 
731C, 731T 460 
815 262.5 
825 262.5 
831C, 831 T 462 
1131C 462 
1331C 462 
X 460 

GOLDEN- 
TONE* 

L5 456 

LB 456 

L7 456 

Z4 456 

Z5 466 

All 1936-7 models 
456 

GOODYEAR 

540 456 

575 175 

670 175 

675 370 

GRAHAM- 
PAIGE 

ATP-101 175 

ATP-102 175 

GRAYBAR* 

(See also 
Colonial) 

GB-8 175 

GB-8-A 175 

GB-9 175 

GB-100 175 

GB-330 180 

GB-340 180 

GB-600 175 

GB-700 175 

GB-770 175 

GB-900 175 

GB-989 175 

GC-13 175 

GC-14 175 

GG-15 175 

GT-7 175 

GT-8 175 

GT-8-56 175 



GT-8-69 175 

GT-10-69 175 

GT-10-88 175 

GT-10-99 175 



GREBE* 

61 -R 456 

89 175 

140 456 

250 456— RC 

360 456 

361 456 

370 456— RC 

371 456— RC 

380 456— RC 

381 456— RC 
620 456— RC 

730 456— RC 

731 456— RC 

830 456— RC 

831 456— RC 

930 456— RC 

931 456— RC 
1240 456— RC 
1650 456— RC 
2150 456 
4110 456— RC 
5140 456— RC 
5240 456— RC 
B-37 456— RC 
HS-3 175 
HS-4 175 
HS-5 175 
HS-6 175 
HS-7 175 
HS-8 175 
HS-12 175 
Letters A, C. D. 
E, H, KC. LC 
after model No. 
indicate cabinet 
style. 



GRIGSBY- 
GRUNOW* 

"Majestic" 



. F. PEAKS 



10 

11 

11-A 

15, 15B 

20 

21 

22 

23 

25, 25B 

35 

44 

49 

50 

51 

52 

55 

56 

57 

58 

59 

60 

61 

62 

66 

67 

68 

69 

75 

77 

85 

86 

94 

95 

105 

111 

111-40 

114 

116, 116A 

118, 118F 

120 

120-B 

121 

123 

150 

151 

153 

154 

155 

156 

160 

163 

194 

195 

196 

200 

201 

203 

204 

210 

211 

214 

215 

220 



1000 
1000 
262 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
456 
456 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
456 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
456 
175 
175 
175 
456 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
456 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
456 
456 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 



and 



COLOR CODING 



PART VI 



Model I. F. 

Chassis Peak 



221 
223 
251, 251 B 

253, 253B 

254. 254B 
260A. 260B 
290 

291 

293 

294 

300, 300A 

303 

304 

307 

310A, 3103 

311 

314 

315 

320 

324 

330 

331 

336 

337 

340, 340B 

344 

351 

353 

360 

363 

370 

371 

373 

390 

393 

400, 400A 

411, 411A 

413. 413A 

440 

450 

460 

461 

463 

490 

491 

493 

500 

530 

550 

560 

566 

570 

600 AC-DC 

666 

776 

800 

886 

996 

998 

F-50 



175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
125 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
456 
175 
175 
175 
175 
456 
456 
456 
456 
455 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
456 
175 
455 
456 
456 
175 
456 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 
175 



2A 

4A, 4B 

4C 
4NB 
5A, 5B 
5C, 5D 
5E 
5G 

5H, 5J 
5K, 5L 
5NB, 
5Q 

5R, 5S 
6A. 6C 
6D, 6F 
6G 

6HB 



262— RC 
455— RC 
/490— RC 
\465— RC 
465— RC 
455— RC 
455— RC 
455— RC 
(465- RC 
\490— RC 
465— RC 
465— RC 
465-RC 
465— RC 
465— RC 
262— RC 
455— RC 
/465— RC 
\490— RC 
465— RC 



RADIO TODAY 



APRIL, 1937 



6J 


1465— RC 


650 


262— RC 


\490— RC 


651 


262— RC 


6M 


465— RC 


660 


262— RC 


7A, 7B 


262— RC 


661 


262— RC 


7C 


455— RC 


662 


262— RC 


7DB 


465— RC 


670 


455— RC 


7M 


465— RC 


671 


455— RC 


7NB 


455— RC 


680 


(465— RC 


8A, 8B 


262— RC 


\490— RC 


8D, 8E 


455— RC 


681 


/465— RC 


8H 


455— RC 


1490— RC 


9A 


262— RC 


690 


455— RC 


9B, 2A 


262— RC 


691 


455— RC 


9C 


262— RC 


700 


262— RC 


9E 


455— RC 


701 


262— RC 


llA. 


262— RC 


711 


455— RC 


IIB 


262— RC 


720 


465— RC 


UC 


455— RC 


721 


465— RC 


IIG 


465— RC 


723 


465— RC 


12B, 


465— RC 


731 


465— RC 


12W 


465— RC 


733 


465— RC 


12A 


455— RC 


735 


465— RC 


15W 


455— RC 


750 


262— RC 


410 


465— RC 


751 


262— RC 


411 


465— RC 


752 


262— RC 


450 


455— RC 


753 


262— RC 


451 


455— RC 


761 


455— RC 


460 


455— RC 


801 


262— RC 


461 


455— RC 


821 


262— RC 


470 


/490— RC 
(465— RC 


823 


455— RC 


831 


455— RC 


500 


455— RC 


835 


455— RC 


501 


455— RC 


833 


455— RC 


502 


455— RC 


861 


455— RC 


503 


455— RC 


871 


455— RC 


510 


465— RC 


901 


262— RC 


520 


455— RC 


902 


262— RC 


530 


455— RC 


921 


262— RC 


532 


465— RC 


941 


.455— RC 


542 


465— RC 


1101 


262— RC 


550 


455— RC 


1151 


262— RC 


551 


465— RC 


1152 


262— RC 


553 


465— RC 


1161 


262— RC 


555 


465— RC 


1162 


262— RC 


560 


455— RC 


1171 


455— RC 


564 


465— RC 


1191. 


456— RC 


566 


465— RC 


1191B 


465— RC 


570 


455— RC 


1241 


455— RC 


571 


455— RC 


1291 


465— RC 


572 


465— RC 


1297 


465— RC 


573 


465— RC 


1.541 


455— RC 


580 


f465— RC 
\490 — RC 






581 


/490— RC 


GULBRANSEN 


\465— RC 


10 


175 


614 


262— RC 


13 


175 


618 


262— RC 


20 


175 


620 


465— RC 


23 


175 


621 


465— RC 


53 (AC 


175 


625 


262— RC 


92 


175 


631 


465— RC 


93 


175 


640 


(465— RC 


130 


175 


1490— RC 


135 


175 


641 


/465— RC 


200 


175 


\490— RC 


235 


175 


643 


465— RC 


236 


175 



c- 


-Condensers 






R.M.A. 


color 


coded 


R- 


—Resistors 






R.M.A. 


color 


coded 


#- 


-R.M.A. 


color 


coding 




used throughout the set 



237 175 

322 175 

351 262 

352 262 
362 262 
392 175 
530 175 
535 175 
872 175 
925 175 

3225 175 

3226 175 
3521 175 
3525 262 
3622 262 

262.5 

3622-A 262 

3722-A 262 

3925 175 

8726 175 

05A 262 

06-W 262 

062A 262 
T 6W (Auto) 

T 6W 1 262 

V 6 Z2 262 

Z 6Z 1 262 

HALLI- 
CRAFTERS* 

5T 465 

SIO 1600 

SU 465 

S12 1600 

514 465 

515 465 

HALSON* 

4M 456 

6L6 456 

15 456— RC 

18M 456 

20B 456 

25 456— RC 

35 456— RC 
50. 50M, 50R 456 
50RL, 50S. 50V 

456 

50X 456 

53C 456 

56U 456 
60, 60L. 601VI 456 

65 456 

66AW 456 

72 456 

75 '456 

78 456 
100, lOOM 456 

101 456 

102 456— RC 

103 456— RC 

104 456— RC 

105 456— RC 
520 456 
505 456 
530 456 

535 456 

536 456 
540 456 
560 456 
570 456 
580 456 
606 456 
610 456 
620 456 
630 456 
770AW 456 
1200 456 
1500 456 
1900 456 
AW6 456 
CA5 456 
CAS 456 
CMS 456 
CMS 456 



Model 

Chassis 

CW6 

CW7 

CW8 

MAS 

MASS 

MA63 

MG5 

NS50 

NS60 

Roadmaster 



I. F. 
Peak 

456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 
456 



HAMMAR- 
LUND* 

Comet 465 

Comet All-Wave 

465 
Comet-Pro 465 
S^per-Pro 465 

HARLEY- 
DAVIDSON 

YA 456 

HARRIS 
ELECTRO- 
TONE* 



670-A 175 

1626 465 

1267 465 

A 680 

AP 175 

AVH 175 

AVO 175 

B-13 456 

C-14 456 

CC-23 456 

CC-24 456 

D 456 

D-S 465 

D-15 465 

D-16 465 

DL 175 

E-14 456 

E-57 456 

E-107 456 

EX 140 

F 465 

F-17 465 

F-18 465 

H 175 

HA-1 175 

HA-2 456 

HA-3 456 

HA-4 175 

HA6 465 

J-3 456 



117-4 175 

9-in-line 175 

Skyhawk 175 

HOODWIN 

See Aero 

HOWARD 

1 (auto) 465 

5-3 456 

6A 465 

8A 465 

20 175 

25 175 

30 175 

32 175 

35. 35-A 175 

40 175 

45 175 

47-A, 47-U 175 
52 

57-A, 57-AUS 456 

57-UA-SW 456 

58, 58-A 465 

58-B 465 

60 (AVH) 175 

60, 60-SW 456 

67, 67-C 465 

67-T 465 

68-C, 68-CA 465 

68-T, 68-TA 465 

6S-TB 465 

77, 77-C 465 

77-T 465 

8S-C, SS-T 465 

99, 99-C 465 

99-T 465 

400 175 

410 175 

420 175 

500 175 

501 175 

502 456 
626 456 



HUPP 
MOTORS 



260 
260 

132 
132 
132 
132 
132 
132 
132 
132 



HAD 
HT-2 

ICA 

Aiglon 

Americus 

Atlantic 

(Bijou) 

Classic 

Elite 

Envoyette 

(Gnome) 

Hy Power (450) 

470 
ICA— 6 
ICA-6 
(210, 250) 
(Latinic) 
Magicolor 
(Mignon) 
(Pacific) 
Super-Conqueror 
115 
Super 6 
Broadcast 
Super 6 
Longwave 
Super 7 
Longwave 
Superba 
Trans-Atlantic 8 

1580 
Trans-Pacific 

1580 
Ultra 1000 470 
Ultra 1050 470 
Unaradio 5 132 
Uni-9 115 

Universal 550 470 
To be continued 

in May 
RADIO TODAY 



462.5 
}470 
132 

462.5 
132 
132 



fl75 
lll5 



115 
470 



•Indicates that the listings have been checked by the manufacturer. 



Whenever possible, it is recommended that reference be made to the 
manufacturer's service notes for complete information on the set. 



500 


465-# 


K 


175 


501W 


465-# 


L 


175 


600 


465— # 


M 


175 


700 
701 W 


465— # 
465-# 


O 
g-9 


175 
170 
465 


800 


465— # 


S-2 


175 


900 


465— # 


S-3 


456 : 


1000 


465— # 


S-7 


175 


1201W 


465— # 


V-11 


135 




W 


465 


HATRY & 


W-6 
W-18 


465 
465 


YOUNG* 


W-19 


465 


HYSW-6 


175 


X-2 


175 


HY-7 


175 


X-3 


175 


HY-7B 


175 


X-S 


175 






Z-4 


175 






Z-S 


175 


HETRO 


Grand 


465 


6LB 


456 


Highwayma 


n 175 


6SB 


456 






22 


115 


HUDSON- 


31 


175 


MOTORS ' 


71 


456 


6.50-HD 


252.5 


207 


456 


651-HE 


252.5 


209 


456 


660-TD 


252.5 


257 


456 


661 -TE 


252.5 


259 


456 


6S0 


252.5 


295 


456 


CB6 


260 


297 


456 


H6 


260 


412 


456 






466 


456 


HUDSON 






ROSS 




HIGH- 


FRE- 


59 


456 1 


OUENCY 


LABS 


SO 


456 
456 



curat^, in a compila ion of th^s mai^i 2h. ' ' '"""^ 100% ac- Acknowledgment is given to the following additional sources of information: Bernsley's 

The editors wnraDDrec"atehear!n^nf?wl;.-^r^ "^°" are possible. OtKcial Radio Service Haudibook. Gernsbact's OfKcial Radio Service Manuals, Ghirardi's 

CaldwTciements Inc Not to be r° wifh'^'?' ^oPyright 1937 by Radio Field Service Data, Hygrade Sylvania's Auto Radio Servicing & Installation, National 

ei i^.emenrs, inc. iNot to De reprmted without written nprn„«,„„ Union's Omdal Chart of Peak Frequencies, Rider's Perpetual Trouble Shooters Manual. 



reprinted without written permission. 



44 



RADIO TODAY, APRIL, 1937 



UTV MICnaEHaNES 



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ly lower output than above, with switch only, 

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With cable connector $34.00 UST 

FINISHES: All microphones have 
the new standard gunmetal finish. 

Chrome or Egg Shell, 
extra $1.00 LIST 

OTHER PASTEL SHADES 
extra $2.00 LIST 

FREE TRIAL OFFER 
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A Two Weeks' Tiial Offer of ihe Amperits 
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AUEM, NEW YORK 



AMPERITE 



MICROPHONES 



April, 1937 



45 



CURING EXTERNAL CROSS-MODULATION 

How to recognize and locate a new source of radio interference 



Interference with iroadcast recep- 
tion was reported recently from va- 
rious cities, of a sort which indicated 
that a new type of cross modulation 
interference had appeared late in 
1935. Many of the cases reported 
were very serious and the circum- 
stances often were mysterious. 

Investigation has revealed that 
most of this interference arises, not 
from any deficiency in receiver de- 
sign, hut from, conditions external to 
the receiver and its antenna, though 
in its immediate neighborhood. 
Remedies have been found for most 
cases. 

The following inaterial, prepared 
for Eadio Today by Arthur VanDych 
of the RCA License Division Labora- 
tory, gives a brief description of the 
phenomenon and the cures found ef- 
fective. In it Mr. VanDycJc quotes 
liberally from an article in John F. 
Rider's "Successful Servicing" re- 
porting tests and studies carried out 
by the RCA License Laboratory bear- 
ing on this new interference source. 
* * * 

These reports of cross modulation 
have been, increasing in recent 
months, particularly in certain local- 
ities. The effect is typically that of 



cross modulation, the programs of 
one or more strong local stations be- 
ing heard at other than their normal 
frequencies. When the station com- 
bination frequencies are such that 
they fall on a channel having a sta- 
tion from which reception is desired, 
the desired station is masked by the 
program from the other station or 
stations. 

This cross modulation effect has 
been reported in the vicinity of the 
following cities : San Francisco, New 
York, Chicago, Cincinnati, Wash- 
ington. 

High field intensities 

The difficulty is not general 
through the area where it is expe- 
rienced, but is found only where 
high field intensity exists (0.1 volt 
per meter or more) and in such areas 
only in certain locations. It may 
exist in a given house whereas an ad- 
jacent house is free from the trouble, 
the same receiver being used in each 
case. In places where the cross mod- 
ulation occurs, the effect is substan- 
tially the same on all makes of re- 
ceivers. 

In past years interference of this 
type was largely due to defects with- 




Suggested procedure to remedying cross-modulation due to rectification taking 
place external to the radio set. 

46 



in the receiver itself. These defects 
were largely eliminated when the 
variable-mu tube was introduced. 
By reducing greatly the amount of 
rectification in the amplifier stages 
of the receiver (especially pronounced 
with the volume control retarded for 
the reception of strong signals), the 
use of these tubes has made possible 
improved volume control design and 
eliminated the generation of har- 
monic and combination frequencies 
which were largely responsible for 
the cross modulation. 

We are not concerned in this ar- 
ticle with the type of cross modula- 
tion which is due to conditions pres- 
ent in the receiver and which is gen- 
erally understood by servicemen. 
However, we might mention in this 
connection that a reduction in the 
length of the antenna and the re- 
placement of sharp-cutoff tubes with 
variable-mu tubes (with the neces- 
sary circuit changes, of course) are 
two of the most effective ways of 
eliminating cross-modulation which 
occurs as a result of conditions with- 
in the receiver. 

Interference by rectification 

With the advent of high powered 
stations, which are frequently located 
within comparatively short distances 
of each other, a new type of cross 
modulation has made its appearance, 
which is being called "External 
Cross-Modulation." Representative 
of this new interference effect, are 
numerous cases that have occurred 
in the vicinity of New York, where 
both WJZ and WOE operate 50 kil- 
owatt transmitters within ten miles 
of each other. WOR operates on YIO 
kc, while WJZ operates on 760 kc. 
In these cases, in localities not far 
distant from these stations, it was 
found that WOR and WJZ inter- 
fered with WNYO (810 kc.) and 
WEAF (660 kc). That is, it was 
possible to hear the program of WJZ 
and WOR while listening to the pro- 
gram of either WEAF or WNYC and 
in many cases the interference was 
so strong that satisfactory reception 
was impossible. 

It is well known that when two 
signals are passed through a recti- 
fying element, certain combination 
and harmonic frequencies are pro- 
duced. If in this case we represent 

Radio Today 




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April, 1937 



47 



ANSLEY 
DYNAPHOXE 




The NEW Model D-23 "Arm Chair" Com- 
bination 7-tube Radio — Short Wave and 
Broadcast — Ansley Crystal Pick-up — 12- 
inch Speaker — Sliding Top Cabinet. 



99 



50 



ANSLEY was 



FIRST 
FIRST 
FIRST 



with satisfactory 
flC - DC Radios 



with Electric 

Portable 
Phonographs 

with Portable 

Radio 
Phonographs 



AI\D ]VOW to give its dealers 
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h Ik\ I ^he New York 
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Ansley Leadership means Dealer Profits 

Write for details of complete line 

ANSLEY RADIO CORPORATION 

240 West 23rd Street New York City 



A SB ORIGINAL 
FREQUENCIES 




200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 1600 



Cross-modulation products produced by rectiiication of two original frequencies 
A and B. New frequencies introduced may cause interference. 



the 760-kc (WJZ) freqiieney by A, 
and the 7l0-kc. (WOE) frequency 
by B, then the following frequencies 
and efFects are produced : 

A + B = 1,470 kc. No interference re- 
sulted in this case because there 
is no useful station operating on 
this freauency in the Xew York 
area. 

A-B = 50kc. No interference resulted 
in this case because this frequency 
lies outside the broadcast band. 

2A = 1,520 kc. "WJZ can be heard at this 
point on the dial but there is no 
station to interfere with. If there 
were, interference would be pro- 
duced at this point. 

2B = 1,420 kc. WOR can be heard at 
this point on the dial but there is 
no station to interfere with. If 
there were, interference would be 
produced at this point. 

2A + B = 2,230 kc. 1 No interference in 

2B -|- A = 2,180 kc. ) these cases because 
both these signals lie outside the 

broadcast band. 

2A-B = 810kc. This is the frequency 
of WNTC. Both WOR and WJZ 
are heard on this frequency in 
some locations. 

2B-A=6eokc. This is the frequency 
of WEAF. Both WOR and WJZ 
are heard on this frequency in 
some locations. 

The above analysis explains how 
the frequencies originate that are re- 
sponsible for the cross modulation in 
the New York area. 



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MANKATO, MINNESOTA, U.S.A. 




EASTERN OFFICE: 259 West 14th 
New York City CHelsea 



Similar tj^pes of cross modulation 
have been reported in the vicinity of 
San Francisco, Chicago, Cincinnati, 
and Seattle. The difficulty is not 
general throughout the area where it 
is experienced, but only where a high 
field intensity exists (of the order of 
0.5 volt per meter) and then only in 
certain locations. It may exist in a 
given house, whereas an adjacent 
house is free from the trouble — al- 
though the same receiver is used in 
each case. In place where the cross 
modulation occurs the effect is sub- 
stantially the same on all makes of 
receivers. 

Locating the source 

So much for the manner in which 
the presence of a non-linear or recti- 
fying element is capable of account- 
ing for the type of cross modulation 
produced. The question now arises, 
where is the rectifying element which 
produces the effect? 

Observation and experiment have 
disclosed that the most common 
source is the power wiring, the effect 
being present generally where the 
power mains are of the exposed over- 
head type. 

The rectifying element may be a 
poor ground connection, it may be 
an oxidized copper conductor in con- 
tact with another copper surface, and 
may even be electrolytic in nature, 
if the soil where the power wiring is 
grounded be moist. Another possible 
source of rectification is in certain 
types of lightning arrestors. 

When such conditions exist, name- 
ly exposed wiring in a region of high 
signal strength and the presence of a 
rectifying element — even though it 
(To page 50) 



48 



Radio Today 



M#VIE RECORDS 

Tie in with new Films to sell more discs 
Fifty-five records now involved 



• ORGANIZED YELL from rec- 
ord dealers has been for some plan 
whereby they can promote new re- 
cordings just when the same tnnes 
become hits at the local movie houses. 

Listed herewith are important films 
which will come to your town soon 
after you read this. With them will 
come a sure-fire demand for records 
of tunes from these pictures. Radio 
Today presents this information in 
time for you to connect with your 
local theatre manager and your rec- 
ord distributor, thus to be ready to 
attract the extra business. 

Dealers can get a series of "stills" 
— scenes from the pictures — and an 
assortment of other music display 
material issued in connection with 
the movies. This is the stuff that 
makes snappy displays for record 
shop windows and counters. Ads. 
circulars, letters and telephone calls 
add to the tricky promotion. 

Here are the pictures to work with 
now, their tunes, and all the records 
involved in the uproar: 

A DAY AT THE RACES (MGM) 

"A Message From the Man in the 
Moon" 

Decca — Ted Fio Rito and orchestra. 

Victor — Guy Lombardo and his Royal Canadians. 
"Blue Venetian Waters" 

Bluebird B6S36 — Johnny Hamp and orchestra. 

Decca — Ted Fio Rito and orchestra. 

Victor — Richard Himber and orchestra. 
"Tomorrow Is Another Day" 

Bluebird B6S36 — Johnny Hamp and orchestra. 

Decca — Ted Fio Rito and orchestra. 

Victor — Guy Lombardo and his Royal Canadians. 

SHALL WE DANCE (RKO) 

"I've Got Beginner's Luck'* 

Bluebird B6878— Shep Fields and Rippling 

Rhythm. 
Brunswick 7S55 — Fred Astaire with Johnny 

Green and orchestra. 
Melotone 7-05-lS — Dick McDonouoh and orch. 
Victor 25544 — Tommy Dorsey and orchestra. 

"Let's Call the Whole Thing Oft" 

Bluebird B6S7S — Shep Fields and Rippling 

Rhythm. 
Brunswick 7857 — Fred Astaire with Johnny 

Green and orchestra. 
Decca 1204 — Jimmy Dorsey and orchcestra. 
Melotone 7-05-14— -Joe Haymes and orchestra. 
"Shall We Dance" 

Brunswick 7857 — Fred Astaire with Johnny 

Green and orchestra. 
Decca 1204 — Jimmy Dorsey and orchestra. 
Victor 25552 — Paul Whiteman and orchestra. 
"Slap That Bass" 

Brunswick 7856 — Fred Astaire with Johnny 

Green and orchestra. 
Decca 1203— Jimmy Dorsey and orchestra. 
Melotone 7-05-14— -Joe Haymes and orchestra. 

"They All Laughed" 

Bluebird B6873 — Ozzie Nelson and orchestra. 



Brunswick 7S56 — Fred Astaire with Johnny 

Green and orchestra. 
Decca 1204 — Jimmy Dorsey and orchestra. 
Melotone 7-05-16 — Nat Brandwynne and orch. 
Victor 25544 — Tommy Dorsey and orchestra. 

"They Can't Take That Away From 
Me" 

Bluebird B6S73 — Ozzie Nelson and orchestra. 
Brunswick 7855 — Fred Astaire with Johnny 

Green and orchestra. 
Decca 1203— -Jimmy Dorsey and orchestra, 
Melotone 7-05-16 — Nat Brandwynne and orch. 
Victor 25549— Tommy Dorsey and orchestra. 

TURN OFF THE MOON (Paramount) 

"Jainmiu' " 

Brunswick 7S63 — Leon Belasco and orchestra. 
Victor 25553— Tommy Dorsey and orchestra. 
"Turn Oflf the Moon" 

Brunswick 7863 — Leon Belasco and orchestra. 
Victor 25553— Tommy Dorsey and orchestra. 

WAKE UP AND LIVE 
(20th Century Fox) 

"It'.s .Swell of You" 

Bluebird B6S96 — Ozzie Nelson and orchestra. 

Brunswick 7S60 — Alice Faye, vocal with orch. 

Brunswick 7S62 — Emery Deutch and orchestra. 

Decca 1212— Ruth Etting. 

Decca 1213 — Chick Webb and orchestra. 

Victor 25545 — Guy Lombardo and Royal Cana- 
dians 

Vocalion 349S — Little Jack Little and orchestra. 
"Nevei' in a Million Years" 

Bluebird 86S96 — Ozzie Nelson and orchestra. 

Brunswick — 7860 — Alice Faye, vocal with orch. 
7862 — Emery Deutch and orchestra. 

Decca 1210 — Bing Crosby. 

Decca 1211 — Glen Gray and Casa Loma orch. 

Victor 25545 — Guy Lombardo and Royal Cana- 
dians. 
"OOh But I'm Happy" 

Vocalion 3498 — Little Jack Little and orchestra. 
"There'.s a Lull in My Life" 

Decca 1211 — Glen Gray and Casa Loma orch. 

Decca 1212 — Ruth Etting. 

Vocalion 3500 — Tommy Tucker and orchestra. 

"Wake Up and Live" 

Decca 1213 — Chick Webb and orchestra. 
Vocalion 3500 — Tommy Tucker and orchestra. 

HOW'S YOUR FRONT? 

* Cheery reports on how radio 
dealers have gone to town by mod- 
ernizing their store fronts are cur- 
rent in the trade. They get mur-h 
of their materials from the Pittsburgh 
Plate Glass Co. and that firm can see 
a trend; two typical cases from its 
files are : 

Roseland Music Shop, Chicago, 
got itself a beautiful front and the 
bill was metal, $359; polished plate, 
$172; carrara, $259; tapestry, $87; 
glazing and labor, $338. Total was 
$1,215. 

Phoenix Electric Co., New Haven, 
Conn., startled its neighbors with a 
classy new front installed at a cost 
of $775, not including the underwork 
or the lettering. C. A. Giorgio, 



Phoenix manager, says that "we find 
modern fronts and interiors a great 
aid in increasing business." 

SALES FROM AN 
ISLAND FIXTURE 

* Set salesmen are enthusiastic 
about the "island fixture," or an iso- 
lated group of sets displayed away 
from the walls of the store. 

Model fixture of this type is 8 feet 
in diameter, 55 inches high, with par- 
tition wings curved from the top to 
the floor. Top may be covered and 
used for display, but if it is higher 
than eye level, it is not a likely stunt. 
Linoleum on the shelves and ledges 
and washable wall paper or wood 
veneers on the wings and back look 
better than painted surfaces, and have 
obvious upkeep advantages. 

"WE GUARANTEE—" 

* At Birmingham, Ala., the firm 
of Loveman, Joseph & Loeb places its 
seal and coat-of-arms on each radio 
sold, not so much as a bid for service- 
calls, but as an added guarantee, back- 
ing up that of the manufacturer. 

"Ours is a 50-year-old institution 
and we find that our name helps to 
sell radios and other appliances just 
as does the name of the manufac- 
turer," said W. L. McAllister. "That 
is why we attach our 'Gift from Love- 
man's' seal on each unit sold. We 
are out to sell our name as much as 
that of the manufacturer, helpful 
though the latter be." 




Alice Faye, screen star, has made two 
new records for Brunswick. 



April, 1937 



49 



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50 



Radio Today 



SERVICE NOTES 



(From page 48) 
be a relatively poor rectifier — tbe 
interfering frequencies will be gen- 
erated. These frequencies will then 
be picked up by the antenna and in- 
troduced into the receiver. 

Also, it has been found that the 
trouble can be caused by contacts be- 
tween electric conduits, plumbing 
pipes, and even from contacts of such 
piping with metal lath in walls 
through which they pass. In short, 
any electrical conductors exposed to 
high power signals, and having a 
rectifying contact, can generate the 
spurious frequencies. Incidentally, 
perhaps a great many cases arise 
from faulty contacts in the antenna 
and ground circuit wiring of the 
receiver installation itself. 

Applying the cure 

If you have been experiencing 
trouble from this type of cross modu- 
lation, the first step is to eliminate 
all poor contacts and joints which 
may be present in the antenna and 
ground circuits. These connections 
should be clean and preferably sold- 
ered. If the cross modulation still 



persists, one or more of the follow- 
ing remedies will probably clear up 
the situation : 

1. Ground the neutral of the house 
wiring at the house in addition 
to retaining the ground at the 
distribution transformer. 

2. Use an improved ground at the 
receiver. 

3. Install r-f bypass condensers from 
the power line to ground at the 
point where it enters the house, 
near the receiver, or in both 
places. 

4. In some cases, it is necessary to in- 
stall r-f chokes in the line, as well 
as the bypass condensers. 

5. Relocate the antenna so that there 
is less pickup from the power line 
to the antenna or lead-in. Use 
a shielded lead-in where neces- 
sary. 

In determining the source of the 
trouble and its location, a small bat- 
tery set equipped with a short anten- 
na is useful. With its aid the place 
where the interfering frequencies 
are being produced can be deter- 



mined witli little effort, so that the 
appropriate steps can be taken. 

The above remedies have been 
found very effective in eliminating 
a great deal of trouble which has 
been due to the presence of r-f volt- 
ages on the power lines and house 
wiring. Familiar experiences of this 
type are those in which the output of 
the receiver varies in accordance 
with whether certain light switches 
are turned on or off. Cases have also 
been reported where the cross mod- 
ulation effect was so related to the 
lighting circuit that it was produced 
only when a certain switch was 
closed. 

House wiring 

These cases have been cleared up 
by the same general procedure de- 
scribed above, which operates on the 
basic principle of the removal of r-f 
potentials from the power line and 
the elimination of any rectifying 
elements or contacts. 

In general, summarizes Mr. Van 
Dyck, the principle of curing this 
type of interference, after making 
sure that there are no bad contacts 
in the antenna, lead-in, or ground 
wiring of the receiver, is to remove 
radio frequency potentials from the 
newer lines of the house, and to elim- 
inate any rectifying contacts. 



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Get in touch with Sylvania now. 
For complete sales and technical 
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SYLVANIA 



THE SET^TESTED RADIO TUBE 



52 



Radio Today 



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TOP VIEW OF SOCKETS 

AVERAGE VOLTAGES (TO GROUND OR B-) AS USED IN SETS 

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54 



Radio Today 



SERVICE NOTES 



AFC CIRCUITS SIMPLIFIED 

* Widespread use of automatic 
frequency control for rapid, easy tun- 
ing has brought forth numerous cir- 
cuits, most of which are basically the 
same. In this article a number of 
the circuits will be interpreted and 
explained — the circuits have been re- 
drawn so as to be easily followed. 

Before discussing the circuits as 
used in production sets, we shall re- 
view the basic principles briefly (for 
a more complete explanation see 
Eadio Today, June, 1936, page 32). 

The output of the I.F. amplifier 
tube is fed to the discriminator trans- 
former which consists of a center- 
tapped secondary coupled through a 
condenser to the plate side of the 
primary winding. The diodes of a 
6H6 tvibe are connected to either side 



of the secondary winding (see Fig. 1). 

When a signal of exactly the I.F. 
frequency is applied to the discrim- 
inator circuit, equal and opposite 
voltages are developed by the diodes 
across the resistors E. Since they 
are opposite in polarity, the sum of 
the voltages from the top diode 
cathode to ground is zero. If the 
signal is not exactly equal to the I.F. 
frequency, the voltages developed are 
unequal and they do not cancel out — 
therefore a potential or voltage ex- 
ists from the top cathode to ground. 
It may be either negative or posi- 
tive with respect to grounding de- 
pending upon whether the applied 
I.F. frequency is too high or low. 

The AFC voltage for the control 
tube is taken off ^ at the top and 
passed through an isolating resistor 
Rj. Note that the junction of re- 




Fig. 1 — Basic circuit of the discriminator used with automatic frequency control. 




Fig. 2 — Crosley's discriminator supplies AVC voltages in addition to AFC. 




Fig. 3— Audio voltage plus AVC and AFC are utilized by General Electric. 

April, 1937 




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instructions, diagrams, etc. 



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55 




with the 

Centralab 
Selector Switch 



• With their definite, 
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Wherever a "multiple- 
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Switch for best results. 



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Paris XI, France 




Fig. 4 — The Grunow discriminator supplies only AFC voltages. 




Fig. 5 — Philco's circuit supplies 2 AFC voltages for a dual control tube. 




Fig. 6 — The load resistors in the Westinghouse circuit are connected 
back to the high potential sides of the discriminator secondary winding. 



sistors E is connected to the center 
tap of the secondary winding. 

Crosley's variation of the basic cir- 
cuit is shown in Fig'. 2. Note that 
it is substantially the same as Fig. 1 
except for the addition of a 3-meg 
decoupling or filtering resistor in the 
AFC voltage lead. This circuit is 
also arranged to provide AVC volt- 
ages — their use in no way interfering 
with the basic operation of the cir- 
cuit. 

Both audio and AVC voltage are 
obtained in G-E's circuit in addition 
to the AFC control voltage. Fig. 3 
is again similar to Fig. 1 except for 
the addition of a 4-meg decoupling 
resistor in the AFC voltage line and 
a filter in the center-tap lead of the 
diode. This second filter is com- 
prised of a R.F. choke and resistor 
with by-pass condensers. The choke 
effectively isolates the center-tap from 
the audio load. If it were not pres- 
ent, the audio load would be im- 
pressed almost directly across the 
plate winding of the primary coil 
through the coupling condenser. The 
E.F. choke has no effect upon the 
AFC discriminator circuit. 

Grunow's model 1.541 (Fig. 4) is re- 
quired to supply only the AFC volt- 
age so it is essentially the same as 



56 



the basic circuit. A 4-meg resistor 
is used for filtering the AFC voltage. 

Basically the circuit (Fig. 5) em- 
ployed by Philco is similar to Fig. 1. 
Its difference is that it must supply 
voltage for a dual control tube, and 
for this reason the mid-point of the 
circuit is grounded instead of one 
cathode. The load resistors of 490M 
are connected the same as in other 
circuits, but they are shunted by 1 
meg. resistors the center of which 
are grounded. It is the mid-point of 
these resistors which determines the 
grounding point of the circuit. De- 
coupling resistors are used in both 
the upper and lower lines of the AFC 
voltage. 

Westinghouse AFC system is uti- 
lized in a superhet circuit using 2 
oscillators. The AFC controlled os- 
cillator is fixed ill frequency, having 
no tuning condenser. Another oscil- 
lator does the tuning and the E.F. 
is converted to one I.F. frequency. 
This I.F. is in turn converted to a 
second I.F. — it is this second I.F. 
s.ystem in which the discriminator is 
located. 

In the Westinghouse discriminator, 
the load resistors are not connected 
together and returned to the center- 
tap of the transformer; but each one. 

Radio Today 



CINAUDAGRAPH If 




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STAMFORD ■ 
CONNECTICUT : 




RT-4 



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Stamford, Connecticut 
Gentlemen : 

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T - O - D - A - Y! ; Name 

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April, 1937 



57 





BY STANDARDIZING WITH 

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FOR MORE THAN 27 YEARS THE WORLD'S 
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MICA • DYKANOl • PAPER • WEI t DRY EUCTBOIYTIC 

CORNELL-DUBILIER CORPORATION 

SO. PLAINFIELD • NEW JERSEY 



s^,- 




SERVICE NOTES 



instead is eoiineeted back to the I.F. 
'•oil at the high-potential ends. The 
AFC voltage is filtered and decreased 
by a voltage divider circuit. 

The oscillator frequency control 
circuits will be discussed in Radio 
Today for May. Complete circuits, 
simplified and easy to understand, 
will be included in this feature. 



CARE OF INSTRUMENTS 

* F. E. Wenger, engineer of Trip- 
lett, believes in providing a special 
place in the automobile or truck for 
the service equipment so that it may 
be fastened securely and cannot 
bounce around or be jarred so that it 
falls from the seat of the car to the 
floor when hitting a bump in the road- 
way. 

After the serviceman reaches his 
destination and proceeds to use his 
testing equipment, he should first 
make sure of the voltages or currents 
which he is measuring and select the 
proper range on the meter. If he is 
in doubt of the approximate value of 
the voltage or current which is to be 
measured, the best procedure would 
be to use the highest scale available 
on the tester so he may determine the 
voltage which the meter is to be placed 
across and thus, avoid many burn 
outs, bent pointers, balance weights 
thrown oif balance, dulled pivots or 
burned springs. 

The greatest danger in burning 
springs is that the temper when re- 
moved, decreases the electrical torque 
of the instrument, and when the elec- 
trical torque of the spring is decreased 
there are consequent errors in the 
readings. Mr. Wenger is extremely sus- 
picious of the accuracy of any meter 
which has been violently overloaded, 
dropped or otherwise damaged, and as 



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58 



Radio Today 



New! 

913 



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sweep lock 

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•60 cycle 
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500 W. HURON ST., CHICAGO, ILL. 

"demand ' ' J^owel Irif ikotdarion 





YOU INSURE 

CUSTOMER 

SATISFACTION 

WHEN YOU USE 

UTAH 
VIBRATORS! 



IT^S TRUE 

UTAH VIBRATORS 

LAST LONGER AND 

GIVE HIGHEST 

EFFICIENCY 



NO need for you to experiment. We've 
proved this 1937 UTAH VIBRATOR 
is the finest and toughest ever made. Manu- 
facturers know it, too. That's why UTAH 
Vibrators are original equipment in more 
than a million sets. 

Give your customers a vibrator that "can 
take it." Use UTAH Vibrators on all your 
replacement jobs. You'll find they work 
better, last longer — but cost no more. Your 
jobber has UTAH Vibrators for all radios. 

For complete information on vibrators for 
auto and farm radios, address department 
RT-4. 



UTAH RADIO PRODUCTS CO. 

CHICAGO. U.S.A. 
TORONTO BUENOS AIRES 

ONTARIO, CANADA TUCOA RADIO PRODUCTS CO.I 

"15 mU OF LEHDEIISHIP" 



April, 1937 



59 



ATLAS 




A few other 


ATLAS Items 


■A- Deflector Baff:e': 


■A- Baffle Stands 


■^ Indoor Siieake 


Enclosures 


-A" Aluminum 


Trumpets 


if Driver Units 


"A Adapters 


■A- Exciters 


if Amplifiers 


if Demountable 


Baffles 


if Square 


Trumpets 


if Mike Stands 


-*- Desk Stands 



$12.50 List. 



CHOOSE YOUR OWN 
P. A. EQUIPMENT 

Out ot the wide Atlas 
line of Sound Equip- 
ment you can make 
up your own "P.A. 
Kit" better and more 
economically — one to 
fit your needs exactly. 
See Atlas First: 

Send for 

NEW CATALOG 

48 New Spe::ialized Items 



-Zea^ Oji^-mcul rocUuff 



ATLAS SOUND CORP. 
1451 39th St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Please send your new Catalog. 



ATLAS 



SERVICE NOTES 



service equipment which is not re- 
liable is of no use to the serviceman, 
and every clay which the service 
equipment is out of his possession 
being repaired means real dollars and 
cents to him, it behooves each and 
every user of electrical measuring in- 
struments to use every precaution in 
the care of his instruments. He will 
be amply repaid for the extra two or 
three minutes per day required to ob- 
serve these precautions. 

A word might be said about the re- 
pairing of instruments in the service 
shop. Servicemen generally do not 
have the necessary and expensive 
equipment for the repair and re- 
calibration of instruments, and these 
should be, as a rule, returned to the 
factory for this type of repair. 

ALIGNMENT NEEDED 

* Radio sets need alignment peri- 
odically just as much as tubes need 
replacement, comment many of the 
leading set manufacturers. 

As a matter of fact, the replace- 
ment of certain tubes requires that 
the set be realigned if maximum per- 
formance is to he obtained. New tubes 



plus realignment will give the set new 
life. 

Alignment can be likened to ad- 
justment of the valve tappets in a car 
— they just get out of adjustment be- 
cause of use. Again, the alignment 
process can be compared vpith car- 
buretor adjustment — a change in the 
quality of gasoline (tubes) means that 
the adjustment should be changed for 
maximum power and efficiency. 

Of course, a serviceman should not 
attempt to realign a set without proper 
equipment and service data for he 
may make the set worse than it was. 
But with proper tools and knowledge, 
the performance of many of the old 
sets can be vastly improved by re- 
alignment. This service should be 
sold as energetically as new tubes and 
other "check-up" campaigns. A chart 
for this purpose is reproduced on page 
1.3 of this issue. 



EXCHANGE BATTERIES, $1 

■*■ One extra battery for each four 
put out with radios is sufficient for 
making battery exchanges under a 
new plan by which the customer is 
provided with a freshly charged stock 
battery when his battery becomes dis- 
charged, on the payment of $1. The 
set owner thus avoids waiting and 



SENDING and RECEIVING 

with the same Antenna 




Amateur demand for a Low Priced Midget Radio 

Frequency Relay for low powered transmitters has 
forced us to bring out a brand new instrument. It is 

described on the new page 6 of Bulletin 507B. Send 
for it. 

WARD LEONARD 

RAD90 SPECIALTIES 



WARD LEONARD ELECTRIC COMPANY 

40 South Street, Mount Vernon, N. Y. 

Please send me page 6 of Bulletin 507B. 

Name 

Street 

City and Slate 

Call Signal 





Models 

metal tubes were'' 
thought of still 
handle the 90 new types which have since ap- 
peared. The total cost to users has been 
$1.50 tor material, instructions and diagrams. 
The one time-proven safeguard against 
obsolescence. There are fourteen other 
real advantages. Learn about ALL of 
them! 






THE RADIOTECHNIC LABORATORY 

1328 Sherman Ave., Depl. RT., EUAHSTON, ILL. 



T Tube '^^^^ ^ 




see 

YOUR 
JOBB€R 



Tube 
Test 



^I^T*-^ ) Equipment 



RADIOTECHNIC 



60 



Radio Today 



makes but one trip to his dealer in- 
stead of two. 

The plan lias been in highly suc- 
cessful \ise by a small-town dealer 
who was able thereby to build up a 
very remunerative battery-set busi- 
ness. 

It was found, on test, that one addi- 
tional battery for dealer stock, for 
each four batteries put out with 
radios was sufficient reserve. To con- 
tinually remind the set owner of the 
convenience and economy of the bat- 
tery-exchange plan, Bob Herr of 
Philco has devised special vent-cap 
tags, acid-resisting and with space 
for dealers name. The tag is secured 
under one of the vent caps of the bat- 
tery at the time it is sold or re- 
charged. 



AUTO-RADIO NOISE 

(From page 25) 

not so easily affected by wheel static 
as are those using the running board 
type aerial which is located near the 
wheels. 

Grounds are an important factor 
in some cars. Occasionally the mui- 
fler, transmission, torque tube, steer- 
ing column, dash controls, and . even 
the motor itself require grounding. 

According to most set manufactur- 
ers, suppressors are not required. In 
the case of stubborn ignition noise 
the use of suppressors may be neces- 
sary. Of recent, new low resistance 
suppressors have been developed. 
Their use will reduce losses in spark 
efficiencv to a minimum. 



TRADE FLASHES 



NEW BOOKLETS 



■*• "Car Radio Service Kit and 
Manual," presenting information on 
1937 Arvins, has been Issued by No- 
blitt-Sparks and may be secured by 
getting a jobber salesman's signa- 
ture on a card supplied for the pur- 
pose. 

■*■ Wall chart of tube character- 
istics, listing 137 types and illus- 
trating basing connections has been 
issued by Arcturus Radio Tube Co., 
Newark, N. J. It is available free to 
dealers and servicemen through 
Arcturus jobbers. 

•*r Characteristics, applications and 
prices of various insulating materials 
is the subject of a new catalog section 
Issued by Westinghouse. Copies may 
be had from district offices or direct 
from Dept. 5-N, Westinghouse Electric 
& Mfg. Co., East Pittsburgh, Pa. 

* Price list bulletin carrying 
complete information for users of 
replacement vibrators has been pub- 
lished by the Radiart Corp., Shaw 
Ave., at E. 133rd St., Cleveland, 
Ohio. 



* Board of directors of the 'Wis- 
consin Radio, Refrigeration & .Ap- 
pliance Association, Milwaukee, re- 
cently elected officers: re-electea 
president, Frank W. Gi'eusel; re- 
elected vice-pres., A. F. Seldel; re- 
elected wholesale vice-pres., Gordon 
Faii-fleld; treasurer, Arthur Schlei- 
Sei-; secretary, B. S. AVisniewski. 

* li. M. Hemian Co., the Boston 
jobbers who distribute Paciflc sets 
and Triad tubes, have added the 
Thomas B. Gibbs line of amplifiers. 

■*• In a recent annual report to 



stockholders, Powel Crosley, Jr., 
president, Crosley Radio Corp., Cin- 
cinnati, presented figures indicating 
"a continuation of improvement in 
the company's business which began 
several years ago." Net profits of 
the Crosley Corp., after depreciation 
and federal taxes, was $1,2 3 7,0 5 6 
for the last fiscal year. 

if Blan, the Radio Man, Inc., 

New York City's well known parts 
dealer, will have a new address Mav 
1: 64 Dey St. 

* New manager of Barclay- 
Warner's radio store at 94 Seventh 
Ave., N. Y. C, is E. ,). Hedges. 



/Ae ^e/icate na.La.nce 



&a^llu -fidju^ted 

with 

Model 1200-C 

VOLT-OHM- 
MILUAMMETER 

• 5000 Ohms Per Volt D.C. 



• Resistance Readings to 
7.5 Megohms 

• For All Radio Measure- 
ments Not Requiring a No 
Current Draw Vacuum 
Tube Voltmeter 



H;is separate A.C and D.C. instru- 
ments in t^vin case ^vith tilting feature 
for accurate reading. Ohm Scales sepa- 
rately adjusted. Lo^v loss s^ritoh. (Con- 
tact error on niilliamperes less than 
V-z %— no contact error on voltage meas- 
urements.) LoTV Ohms scale requires 
hut 6% niilliamperes. Accuracy hoth 
A.C. and D.C. guaranteed irithin 2 % . 
AH Metal Case. 

Scale Reads: D.C. 10-50-S50-500-1000 
Volts at 5000 Ohms per volt; 250 Micro- 
amperes; 1-10-50-250 Milliamperes; y-z 




DEALER PRICE 



$^^33 



to 500 low ohms backup circuit : 1.500 
Ohms; 1.5 and 7.5 Megohms; A.C. 10-50- 
250-500-1000 Volts. 

The delicate balance of high fidelity 
sets requires servicing instruments 
cap^ible of measuring high resistance 
and all voltages accurately. 

Model 124)0-C Volt-Ohni-3Iilliammeter 
has self-contained power for readings 
to 7.5 Megohms. The D.C. voltage read- 
ings are Vit 5000 ohms per volt enabling 
you to read accurately the voltages of 
low power. 



A TRIPLETT MASTER UNIT 



SEE YOUR 

WRITE FOR 



JOBBER 
CATALOG 



ELECTRICAL INSTRUMENTS 




llie Triplett Electrical Instrument Co. 
1»4 Harmon Ave., Bluffton, Ohio 

"VS^ithout obligation please send me 

iimre information on D Model 1200-C; 

Complete Triplett Master Unit Line. 



X, 



me 



April, 1937 



61 



DOPE ON DISTRIBUTORS 

— jobbers in 10 states reveal inter-phone activity 

— they move, re-build, add lines, and otherwise expand 



* Current sport among manj' big 
jobbers of the country is to wade 
into the intercommunicator business. 
Distributors in California, Kansas, 
Colorado, Ohio, Nebraska, New 
York, Delaware, Alabama. New 
Jersey and Pennsylvania report to 
RADIO TODAY that they now have 
a department for this merchandise. 

This news on selling the inter- 



phones is only that which was re- 
ceived within a few weeks, but seems 
to indicate a national trend in favor 
of the inter-room talkers. After all, 
the device belongs to the tube-ampli- 
fier type of gadget, and is distinctly 
a radio item. 

Other wholesalers have not yet 
established a department for the 
instruments, but exhibit interest. 



WHEN YOU 

REPLACE 

RADIO SHAFTS 

USE ONLY 





FLEXIBLE SHAFTS 
and CASINGS 



They*re standard original equipment 
on practically all Auto Radios . . . 

They're specially designed and built for 
auto radio application. 

They provide smooth, sensitive tuning, 
without "stiff" spots or "jumping." 

They assure satisfied customers — and 
that means more business for you. 



• BE SURE to ask your jobber 
for ffenuine S, S. WHITE 
Shafts and Casings. 

The S. S. WHITE 

DENTAL MFG. CO. 
INDUSTRIAL DIVISION 

10 East 40th Street, Room 2310T 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 




Anthony (Joe) Dillon, with experi- 
ence in England, New Orleans, Radio- 
marine, etc., before starting with 
Bruno-New York, is a new sales 
supervisor for that jobber. 

Electric Appliance Co., 580 W. Broad 
St., Elyria, Ohio, is an example. 

Is this the kind of stuff that is 
likely to help remove the low spots 
in the radio sales curve? Typical 
"yes" replies came from Gettman's, 
in Norfolk, Neb., and from Kladag 
Radio Labs in Kent, Ohio. 

* Tiiie & Blanchard Co., Inc., 

Newport, Vt., jobbers, have a new 
salesman in the northern Vermont 
and northern New Hampshire areas: 
Clarence A. Blossoin. 

■k Wholesale Radio Senice Co., 
Inc., New York, have begun sponsor- 
ship of a series of 2 6 weekly "RCA 
Service Meetings of the Air," over 
local station WXEW. Technical 
supervisor of the series is F. B. Ost- 
man, RCA service manager, and 
leading engineers from RCA labs 
will broadcast by turns. Stunt is 
designed to discourage amateur at- 
tempts at home radio repairing, since 
the public will be listening. Weekly 
prizes will be offered technicians. 

* New home of the Ciiimpacker 
Distiibiitiiig Corp., Houston, Tex., 
has been formally opened with sev- 
eral special features. Ninety-foot 
main display room is air-conditioned, 
acoustically treated, has doors with 
electric eyes. Set-up includes a 
special radio-bar display, storage 
room for 12 carloads of sets, and 
provision for a salesmen school 
twice a month. 

* Coffeyville, Kan., jobbers, 
Onll W. Carter Elec. Co., are ex- 
panding their parts department. 
Firm now has products of 13 differ- 
ent companies, will add more. 

•*• New location of Standard 
Radio Parts Co., Dayton, Ohio, is at 
135 E. Second St. Service and dis- 
play facilities have been greatly ex- 
panded. 

■k Kraus.s Radio Distributors, 
Inc., Cincinnati, has been named 
local wholesaler for Emerson. Mor- 
ris Ki-auss, firm head, is now look- 
ing for larger quarters where the 
company may establish a spacious 
home. 



62 



Radio Today 



ON THE TRADE TICKER 



* David E. Bright, president ot 
Pioneer Gen-E-Motor Corp. of Chi- 
cago, has returned to Chicago after 
several weeks on the Pacific Coast, 
visiting jobbers and dealers in Cali- 
fornia, Washington, and Oregon. He 
Tvas gratified to find the trade keenly 
interested in his new "Red Top" 
gas-o-lectric power plants. Inquiries 
received from representative Jobbers 
in Southern territory will take Mr. 
Bright as far south as Florida before 
the month is over. 

* Miss Helen Staiiiland, vice- 
president of Quam-Nichols Co., Chi- 
cago, manufacturer of loud-speaker 
units, returned recently to her desk 
after visiting set manufacturers 
throughout Western territory. She 
received substantial orders and found 
all of the factories busily engaged 
getting ready for their new lines. 
Quam-Nichols' sales for the first 
quarter of 1937 were far ahead of 
the same period of 1936, which was 
the best in the company's history. 
Recently considerable interest has 
been manifested by parts jobbers in 



the distribution of 
products. 



Quam-Nichols 



* E. S. Riedel, sales manager of 
Raytheon Production Corp. with 
headquarters in Chicago, has just in- 
formed the Midwestern trade of an 
expansion in the company's ware- 
house and office facilities whereby 
it will occupy the entire third floor 
of the building at 445 Lake Shore 
Drive. Increased sales volume from 
manufacturers and jobbers necessi- 
tated this additional floor space. 

* To operate as Aerovox Canada, 

Ltd., the former Polymet Delta Co. 
of Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, has 
been taken over by Aerovo.v and will 
produce a line of that firm's wet and 
dry electrolytic condensers, also mica 
and paper condensers for the Cana- 
dian trade. 

* Recent announcement from 
Champion Radio Works, tube mak- 
ers of Danvers, Mass., was the ap- 
pointment of John Q. Adams, Chi- 
cago, as sales manager for the com- 
pany. Mr. Adams succeeds Greg 
Hallani, who resigned. 




Don Dulweber (right), pres.. Supreme 

Instruments Co., discusses ad plans on 

a new line with Ralph Mathews of 

Ford, Browne & Mathews. 



SERIES 700 CROWE PANEL CONTROLS for ANY AUTO RADIO 

in 1935, 1936 and 1937 cars 
NEW DOUBLE-UNIT CONSTRUCTION GIVES YOU: 




Ask for Bulletin No. 202. 
Gives full details on the 
new Series 700 remote con- 
trols, flexible shafts, end 
fittings, and other acces- 
sories. 



1. Same control luiit in all cars. 

2. Airplane or porthole dial (as specified by car 
manufacturer) without changing control unit. 

3. Quick installation without drilling, saw ing, or 
filing any instrument panel. 

4. Custom control for any make of radio. 

5. Full coverage for all ratios, with or without on- 
off switch, sensitivity switch, tone control, and 
other features. 

6. Approved styling for everj- car. 

7. Smooth, dependable operation. 



Order from your jobber. Liberal trade discounts. 

CROWE NAME PLATE AND MANUFACTURING CO. 

1771 Grace St. Chicaso — Cable Address: Croname-Chicaso 





AUTO RADIO 

REMOTEOCABLE 

REPLACER 




J. F. D. SHAFTING AND CASING 



With the Remote-0-Cable Replacer, a supply of shafting and casing, 

same as used by leading manufacturers and an assortment of fittings, 

you can immediately deliver any length or type of Auto Radio Con- 

rol Cable. Properly connect any auto radio to any dashboard head. 

radio jobbers, distributors and servicemeyi write for full particulars. 

J. F. D. MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

4111 Fort Hamilton Parkway Brooklyn, N. Y. 




^ 



April, 1937 



63 



1000 % 



^^^p= 



Over one thousand per cent, in- 
crease in sales so far this \ear' 
That is the amazing record of the 
Parris-Dunn Corporation! Our 
powerful merchandising plan, 
thoufih widely copied, has never 
been duplicated in GENUINE 
PROFIT POSSIBILITIES for the 
farm radio retailer. 

No wonder the Dunn-Charfter is 
'■|Soini> to town"! The new \m 
features put It In A CL.\SS B\ 
ITSELF. It has advantages that 
make it the FIRST CHOICE OP 
THOUSANDS OF FARMERS The 
Hy-Tower makes the Dunn-CharC- 
er 27% more efficient, as it puts 
the charger in the unbroken wind 
stream and assures effective ser- 
vice with even the very slightest 
breeze. The extra heavy-dut> gen- 
erator is built from all new p.irts 
Hearings permanently sealed in 
oil. .Absolutely foolproof. 

.And the merchandising plan 
puts RE.\L rROFIT-rOME R 
«ilhiii 1 he reach of t hi' rcl -.uLr <if 

I...1.1V radios. .Mail t h. i>"ir 

I., t .li'i.iils of this pl.iii \(i\v ' 



PON! 



I To Parris-Dunn Corporation 
I Ciarinda, Iowa Dept. A29 

I RUSH FULL DETAILS OF YOUR SENSA- 
I TIONAL SALES PLAN FOR SELLING 
I MORE BATTERY RADIOS. | 

I Name 

I Street 



City- 



- Slate- 



u tLpphJoved Inf 

AMERICA'S LEADING 
RADIO MANUFACTURERS 



i Make of Battery Radio Handled. 



RADIO HARDWARE 

We carry in stock all standard and many special items of radio hardware used by manu- 
facturers of sets, speakers, sound equipment, testing instruments, parts, etc. You will 
save valuable time by using our Bulletin SO as your buying guide for 




MACHINE SCREWS & NUTS 

TUBULAR RIVETS 

EYELETS ETC. 

EYELET LUGS 

SPADE LUGS . 



SOLDERING LUGS 
BRASS WASHERS 
STEEL WASHERS 
FIBRE WASHERS 
LOCKWASHERS 



METAL TAPPING SCREWS 
SPEAKER MOUNTING SCREWS 
ESCUTCHEON SCREWS 
WOOD SCREWS 
RUBBER GROMMETS 



Sendjor a Copy of Bulletin 50 Today 

Plejise Check Q Maiiiituotiirer D Jobber 

FEDERAL SALES CO., 26 s. jefferson, CHICAGO 



JOBBER NEWS 



• Two big jobbers of Atlanta, 
Ga., have merged; Lamar-Kaiikin 
Co. and Dixie Radio Distiibutors, 
Iiie. Former name will be that of 
the new company and Mitch Kd- 
ward.s, president of the Dixie firm, 
will manage the appliance depart- 
ment. 

• At the F. K. Gooding Co., 

jobbers of Wilmington, Del., George 
O. Davis has been added to the sales 
staff to cover lower Delaware and 
eastern Maryland. 

• George H. King is now city 
city salesman for Stimpson Sales & 
Investment Corp., distributor firm of 
Wichita, Kan. 

■*• Newcomers to the staff of 
H. E. Dunn, Inc., distributors of Des 
Moines, la., are K. W. Miller and 
E. H. Altord. 

• Wholesaler's division of the 
Electric League of Indianapolis re- 
cently elected a new chairman: Roy 
L. Brown, of Wesinghouse Electric 
Supply Co. Elected vice-chairman: 
Adolph Wagner, Wagner Radio Co. 

■* R. C. Hager, vice-pres. and 
general manager of the Tracey- 
Wells Co., distributors, has named 
an assistant: J. E. Howell. C. O. 
Ti-acey, the company's treasurer, also 
selected an assistant, John P. Cast- 
ner. Firm has a branch in Cleve- 
land, the Arnold Wholesale Corp., 
and one in Columbus, -Appliance 
Distributing Co. 

• Howard Diuigly and Ray 
Satchell have been added to the 
sales personnel of the GE Supply 
Coi-p. of Cleveland, Ohio. 




M. R. Cooper, chief of Electric & 

Radio Co., Butte, Mont., jobbers. 

Firm now has new quarters. 



64 



Radio Today 




Edgar Morris, pres., Edgar Morris 

Sales Co., Washington, D. C, new 

jobbers for Zenith. 



* Spokane, M^ash., branch of the 
l'\ 15. Connelly Co., Seattle, Is being 
remodeled along modernistic lines. 
New employees there are Q. B. Grif- 
fin, office and credit manager; Betty 
IjOu Rooks, secretary; Foixest SI. 
Clark, service dept. ; and Clark R. 
Libbey, shipping dept. Also on the 
staff are John B. Simons, salesman; 
Dent Gwinn, assistant office man- 
ager; and Lowell Jackson, salesman. 

* Marshall - Wells, jobbers of 
Billings, Mont., were recently hosts 
at a 3-day merchandise show which 
was called an "Associate Congress." 
More than 100 delegates attended; 
climax of the affair was a big ban- 
quet on the last evening. 

■*■ New Crosley distributor for 
Nebraska is H. E. Dimn, Omaha. H. 
E. Dunn is president of the firm and 
C. I. .'ilford sales manager. 

* RCA Radiotron distributors 
are offering to dealers an automatic 
pencil which is a combination screw- 
driver and a reference for service 
data. 

* New line added by D. & H. 
Distributing Co., Inc., Harrisburg, 
Pa., is ABC washers. 




s 



TAR Auto Radio Controls 



Several territories open 
for factory representation. 




if One control unit fits all cars — all radios; regrarrtless of 

ratios or panel openings. 
'A" Star control has every "ratio*' self-contained in one 

head^sniall, compact and simple to in-stall— ^vitliont 

filing: or drilling. 
if A really 100% universal control nnit — clock ivise or 

connter-clocknise on same difil. 
if Aeroplane dial used on all cars-^giving- ideal 

visibility. 
if Custoin-ntatclied plates for :ill instrument 

panels of 10X5-30-37 c:irs. 
if Write for our illustrated oat:iIog' and trade 

discounts. Distributed throu;g;h autiiorixed 

jobbers only. 

STAR MACHINE MANUFACTURERS, INC. 

Precision Instrument Makers Since 1913 
1371 EAST BAY AVENUE BRONX, I>1EW YORK 




TR.\1)E MAIiK 




April, 1937 



6A8G 




...another 
ARCTURUS 

ENGINEERING 

TRIUMPH- • • 

Radio technicians everywhere know 
the Arcturus 6A8G not by any dif- 
ference in its outward appearance, 
but by outstanding performance 
resulting from . . . 
. . . Unique chemical and nnechan- 
ical treatment of component 
elements which reduce noise to 
an exceptionally low level even 
under severe vibration. 
. . . The most severe short wave 
band test for oscillation that 
could be devised. (Each tube 
gets this test individually — 
then, like all Arcturus tubes, is 
again tested in an actual 
radio receiver.) 
. . . Great advancement in geo- 
metrical construction and pro- 
cessing methods which assure 
uniformly high sensitivity on 
ALL Twave bands over a long, 
useful life . . . 

Add these essential factors to the 
long life of the Arcturus 6A8G and 
you have a combination unexcelled 
for long, satisfactory performance. 

Try them today. Know 
them BY RESULTS! 




ARCTURUS RADIO 

TUBE C014PANY 

Newark, N. J. 



AI^€TyifeMg I 



ON THE TRADE TICKER 

— why not, say field men about higher prices 

— nearly every company appoints somebody 



* Interviews with radio men in 
10 states indicate what the trade's 
attitude is in the matter of higher 
retail prices, this time from the angle 
of field activity. Opinions were ex- 
pressed for Radio Today In exactly 
15 jobbing centers. 

Even dozen said flatly "yes" the 
public is ready for higher retail prices. 
An answer from Topeka, Kan., was: 
"not in this drouth area." A sharp 
"no" from Nebraska indicates further 
that those areas have been hit by 
lack of rain. 

Statement from Tuscaloosa. Ala., 
was: "not ready in this section but 
resigned to it." Attitude in Colorado 
is tliat rising prices are OK, "provided 
they are kept within bounds." 

* Atlas Soiuid Corp., Brooklyn, 
X. Y., announces the recent appoint- 
ment of the Edwards Sales Co., 565 

Bangor Bldg., Cleveland, Ohio, and 
J. Y. Schoonmaker of 413 3 Shenan- 
doah Ave., Dallas, Tex., as sales rep- 
resentatives for their line of public 
address and sound equipment prod- 
ucts. Edwards covers the complete 
tc-iritory of Ohio, and the city of 
Louisville, Ky. Schoonmaker cov- 
ers the entire states of Te.xas and 
Louisiana. 

* At the Wm. H. Block Co., big 

department store of Indianapolis, 
Iiid., radio manager Lawrence has 
enlarged his displays, and has start- 
ed a 6-weeks ad campaign in local 
newspapers. Keene Jaekson, sales 
manager of International Radio 
Coi-p., Ann Arbor, Mich., checked 
up and found that Block's is now 
carrying the complete Kadette line, 
of 21 models. 



* Radio division of General Elec- 
tric, Bridgeport, Conn., has a new 
manufacturing engineer, Aubrey R. 
Goodwin. Appointee has had a long 
experience as head of manufacturing 
operations, in this country as well 
as in Canada, Argentine, Chile and 
Brazil. 

* Ansley Radio Coi-p., New York, 
makers of Ansley Dyiiaphone, have 
a new sales manager, George P. 
Lohnian. For the past 4 years, he 
has been working with New York's 
leading radio retailers; prior to that 
he was active in factory promotions 
at Stromberg-Carlson and at RCA. 
Mr. Lohman is on a long journey 
through cities of the East and Middle 
West. 



■*• In an annual summary of op- 
erations for the Ken-Rad Tube & 
Lamp Con>., Owensboro, Ky., Roy 
Bui'lew, president, reveals that "this 
company is now the second largest 
manufacturer of metal tubes in the 
country." Mr. Burlew also stated 
that Ken-Rad is prepared to expand, 
with general business continuing to 
expand, and conditions within the 
tube industry more stable. 

♦ V. A. Gwyer, vice-president. 
Transducer Corp., New York, has 
picked up an unusual item from 
Vnlon Sound Seiiice, Allentown, Pa.: 
a customer, using a TR-3 "Bullet" 
mike, had an accident in which the 
mike fell off the stage and hit a 
concrete fioor 8 feet below; it is 
still being used although the case 
and mounting ring were broken. 




INDEPENDENT TUBES FOR DEALERS WHO 
DO THEIR OWN INDEPENDENT THINKING 



First radio contract under the N. Y. Fair Trade Act, being signed with Ansley 

Radio Corp. by P. R. Bowers of the R. Wurlitzer Co. Left is Arthur C. Ansley; 

right, Ray S. Erlandson, Wurlitzer sales mgr. 



66 



Radio Today 




April, 1937 



67 



PEP-PRODUCTS AMONG APPLIANCES 

Higher temperatures mean cooling merchandise on radio sales floors 



• WAEM-DAY business needs 
stimulating- and not a few radio 
dealers are going to bat for tbe room- 
cooler business. 

Manufacturers of these portable 
summer air conditioners have de- 
signed themselves into the kind of 
merchandise that packs a great sales 
v,'allop. At this point they give the 
consumer color, economy, streamlines, 
casters, flexilnlity, five years to pay, 
etc. 

Conditioner engineers have settled 
down to a long list of precision de- 
vices for cooling, dehumidifying, 
washing and circulating the air. 
Those selling modern coolers have 
been awarded a series of talking 
points not available before 1937. 

Appeal widened 

Eadio men are particularly inter- 
ested in the fact that air conditioner 
sales for homes are swiftly increasing 
as compared with commercial instal- 
lations. In 1936, 25 per cent of all 
installations were residential; year 
before, the figure was 17 per cent. 

Installation problems have been 
simplified and service aspects are 
today on a comfortable basis. New 
merchandise is presented as beautiful, 
compact, quiet and fool-proof. 

Here is a list of some of the makers 
of the new-type summer gadgets : 

Air Devices Corp., 210 Clark St., 
Chicago, 111. 



Airtemp, Inc. (Chrysler), Dayton, 
Ohio. 

Carrier Engineering Corp., 8 50 Fre- 
linghuysen Ave., Newark, N. J. 

Climax Engineering Co., 121 E. Mor- 
ris St., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Corozone Air Conditioning Corp., 
Cleveland, Ohio. 

De La Vergne Engine Co., Chester 
Pk. and Simpson Ave., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

Delco-Frigidaire Conditioning Divi- 
sion, General Motors Corp., Day- 
ton, Ohio. 

Fairbanks, Morse & Co., Indianapo- 
lis, Ind. 

General Electric Co., Bloomfield, N. J, 

Kelvinator Corp., Detroit, Mich. 

Norge Division, Borg-Warner Corp., 
Detroit, Mich. 

Pleasantaire Corp., 304 E. 45th St., 
New York, N. Y. 

Servel, Inc., Evansville, Ind. 

Standard Air Conditioning, Inc., 50 
W. 40th St., New York, N. Y. 

Strang Air Conditioning Corp.. 215 
E. 20th St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Westinghouse Elec. & Mfg. Co., 
Mansfield, Ohio. 

York Ice Machinery Corp., York, Pa. 

"CAPACITOR" MORE DESCRIPTIVE 
THAN "CONDENSER" 

* There are condensers and con- 
densers in the electric refrigeration 
art. A condenser may be of the vapor 
type, intended for the condensation 
of gaseous refrigerants. Again, it may 
be of the electric tyiJe, intended for 
motor-starting functions. Hence the 
term is confusing and often mis- 
leading. 

In place of "condenser," the term 




Example of likely summer merchandise: window "Air Pilot" by Standard. 



"capacitor" is being urged by Aero- 
vox Corporation of Brooklyn, N. T., 
for electrical and radio functions. 
Employed for some time past in radio 
terminology, the use of the term "ca- 
pacitor" is even more important in 
refrigeration to avoid possible confu- 
sion between electrical and mechan- 
ical devices. 

ZONING SALESMEN MAKES FRIENDS 

*■ A zoning system for radio and 
electrical-appliance salesmen is used 
by Evans Electric Appliances, Bir- 
mingham, Ala. This prevents the 
men from spending too much time 
jumping from one part of the town 
to the other and causes them to work 
their territories more intensively. 

"We figure that the more friends 
a salesman makes in a neighborhood 
the more sales he should make," said 
J. M. Evans, proprietor. "Call-backs 
on customers result not only in other 
sales to them, but in service business 
as well, besides developing names of 
other prospects in the neighborhood. 

"Some of our salesmen have been 
quite successful selling radio owners 
loud-speakers for the woman of the 
house to use in the kitchen, also in 
the sale of extra sets for the bedroom. 
Sometimes the owner of the home can 
be sold a radio for his office or for 
his summer cottage." 



* New retail sales manager for 
Boreii Bicycle Co., Little Rock, Ark., 
is E. B. Jlatkin. Boren's recently 
held a feature showing of 1937 
Ci'osley Shelvadors, for dealers of the 
state. 



■k Xorge distributors and deal- 
ers in Boston and New England 
areas began last month to sponsor 
a series of 3 9 quarter-hour broad- 
casts on AVBZ and AVBZA. Program 
is called Norge All Star Varieties and 
will feature famous dance bands, 
comedians and singers. 

* Tom Killian, Inc., Denver, 
Colo., automotive distributors, have 
opened a new branch devoted to 
Crosley products. H. C. Royer, 
former Crosley wholesale man, has 
joined the department; dealer- 
shows and service schools have been 
held as a part of a vigorous mer- 
chandising campaign. Similar ac- 
tivity has been noted at Aniwican 
Electric Co., Kansas City, Mo., job- 
bers. 



68 



Radio Today 




THE ELECTRIC REFRIGERATOR 
THE ENTIRE NATION IS BUYING 

THE NEW 1937 




It's the sales-sensation oi the year — this new 1937 Croslcy 
Shelvador. Everybody's talking about it . . everybody's 
buying it. "Mrs. America" has put hei unreserved 
approval on the Shelvador because it alone offers hei 
all the features she demands— MORE BK\UTY, MORE 
ECONOMY, MORE CON\'EMEXCE, MORE USABLE 
SPACE, :\IORE ACCESSIBILITY . . . plus the EX- 
CLUSIVE, fully insulated shelves-in-the-dooi . Dealers 
are enthusiastic over the Shelvador because it gives 
them powerful selling features that can be convincingly 
demonstrated. It's a lot easier and more profitable to 




THE CROSLEY RADIO CORPORATION - CEVCDVNATl 



Home of ''the ISation's Station"— WLW — 70 on your dial 



follow the trend than to buck it. Line up with the 
Crosley Shelvador and sell the electric refrigerator that 
everyone is buying See your Crosley Distributor today 
for details of the Crosley Franchise. 

Model shewn above is the DeLuxe HL5-71. Capacities: 
Net cu. ft. 7.1; shelf area 16.77 sq. ft. Features: Shelva- 
dor, Electrosaver, 18-Point Temperature Control, Built-in 
Thermometer, Automatic Interior Light, Stora-drawei , 
Tilting Shelves. Removable Shelf Section, Beetleware 
Cups, Crosley Cnsper. Ten other standard and DeLuxe 
Shelvador models priced from $99.50. 

POWEL CROSLEY, Jr. 

Presiden t 




April, 1937 



69 




STancoR 

TRANSFORMERS 

STANCOR has disproved the old bro- 
mide, "One make is as good as an- 
other" . . . for (in a few short years) 
Stancor has attained a reputation in the 
industry for SUPERB QUALITY .... 
achieved through careful engineering, 
the closest kind of inspection and spe- 
cial manufacturing equipment, much of 
which was designed in our own plant 
for exclusive Stancor processes. 

STANDARD 
TRANSFORMER 
CORPORATION 

850 BLACKHAWK STREET, CHICAGO 



"klDlR MANUAL OWNERS 
ARE THE KEY MEN OF 



SAYS THE SALES PROMOTION MAN OF y^ 
ONE OF THE BIG SET MANUFACTURERS 

"Aimost without exception the most successful servicemen 
in America are owners of complete sets of Rider Manuals." 

VOL. This fact is convincing evidence thaf 
VII those shops which are able to perform 
15,^ the more intricate, more unusual, more 
1937 profifabfe jobs, are the ones which 
$10>00 recognize the time and money saving 
advantages of having authentic serv- 
ice data at theirfinger tips at all times. 
Better be sure YOU hove all seven 
volumes or fill in your set at your 
jobber's today I 




aieic]ii«®iQiiiiiia. 



2 ^<^^ RIDER BOOKS 



ALIGNING 
PHILCO RECEIVERS 

This new book presents 
authentic and complete in- 
structions for fast and ac- 
curateolignment operation 
on ANY of the 8,000,000 
Phiico receivers. Every 
trimmer is located for you. 
176 pp. Hard t^^OO 



. Only 



'Hour a doy with Rider" 

on AITERNATING CURRENTS 

IN RADIO RECEIVERS 

Familiarizes you with the 
different forms of alternat- 
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radio receiver. Illustrated 
with drawings ond ^f\- 
o.ollooran,. _ OUC 



—AND THE THIRD 
EDITION OF— 

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SUPERHETERODYNES 

Revised edition has com- 
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commercial receivers. 
324 pp. Over 
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$1.00 



JOHN F. RIDER, Publisher, 1440 Broadway, N. Y. C. 




CONTINENTAL 

C ar bon 
Spark SUPPRESSORS 




CONTINENTAL Carbon's new 5000-ohm 
low-voltage coefficient spark suppressors ef- 
fectively squelch ignition interference, thus 
releasing the avc circuit and the full sensitivity 
of your set. 

Make this test — tune in a distant station 
while driving on a country road at 30 to 50 
miles per hour. Shut off your ignition and note 
if the radio reception is better. If it is better 
with the motor shut off, you need CON- 
TINENTAL suppressors. 

For spark plug suppression select S27, 
S20A, or S21, in 5000-ohm resistance. Use 
T1 3 or T1 1 for the distributor in 1 0,000 ohms; 
T1 7 for Ford V-8 distributors. Available from 
leading radio jobbers. 

Complete every auto noise-suppression job 
with CONTINENTAL Carbon by-pass con- 
densers; heat resistant, moisture proof, ec- 
nomical. Handy Pocket Data on Radio Inter- 
ference Elimination, 10c postpaid. 



CONTINEKTAL CARBOHlncM 



I 1 3910 Lorain Ave., Cleveland, Ohio 



(Toronto, Canada) 



I Please send FREE, Auto Radio Engineering Bulletin 101 A. 

I 
I 
I 



Address . 



I City Jobber. . 



70 



Radio Today 




M. F. Klicpera, vet "sound" man, now 
heads Webster-Chicago's Western sales. 

♦ Precision Apparatus Coip., 

821 E. New York Ave., Brooklyn, 
N. Y., has announced that their in- 
struments will now be available on 
a time payment plan. 

•k J. H. Clippinger, vice-president 
and sales manager of the Continental 
Radio & Television Corp. of Chicago, 
announced recently the appointment 



TRADE FLASHES 



of S. B. Galitzky as sales representa- 
tive for Admiral sets in Michigan 
territory, with headquarters in De- 
troit. "Sam" is well known in the 
Michigan trade, having called upon 
dealers in this section of the country 
for many years. 

* United Sound Engineering Co., 
St. Paul, Minn., has announced that 
its sound systems and intercommuni- 
cators are now fully licensed by t.r- 
rangement with Electrical Research 
Products, Inc., under patents owned 
and controlled by Ameilcan Tele- 
phone & Telegraph Co. and Western 
Electric Co., Inc. 

■*• Recently the Brush Develop- 
ment Co., Cleveland, moved to its 
own building at 3 311 Perkins Ave. 
Brush thus celebrates its expansion 
from 1,000 sq. ft. iioor space in 
1932 to the present 4-story building. 

* Popular president N. P. niooin 
of Adler Mfg. Co., Louisville, Ky., 
has resigned. Mr. Bloom retires 
from the post after 20 years of ser- 
vice and "r.t the conclusion of the 
most successful year the company 
has ever known." His statement to 
"Radio Today" also reveals plans for 
"a much needed rest for a while, 
vv'ith no particular plans as yet for 
the future. ... I leave with the 
knowledge that our organization is 
functioning better than it ever has 
and in the hopes that our friends 





M. Lehman, president, Lehman Radio 

Salon, N. Y. C, has announced that 

the mfg. division of the Salon is now 

called Port-O-Matic Corp. 

and customers will continue the 

pleasant business relations with the 

Adler Co. that have held in the 
past." 

* H. R. Peters, president, National 
Union Radio Corp., reports several 
additions to the firm's engineering 
staff. Most important is Dr. Fred- 
erick Holburn, now chief engineer 
for NU, who was educated abroad 
and was since employed by leading 
American companies. Other new- 
comers at NU are Paul Schiverui and 
H. A. Wilder. 



.:|P||||8|K||»pp|||||i|^^ 




pi So Mid « jobber who iinmecJi«tety recosnized 
|-th« finer «ppe«ancc and plus value of tl>c»e Simp- i 

»on InsbumenU, And he is rishf. Pictures and ! 

words just can't do them justice — but one inspec- i 

iiot will tell the story to you who know instrument 
; quality and value. 
|, Read the facts about these two great Simpson 

Instruments, which cover every class of work. But : 
i^^in (airness to yourself and your jobber — jee 
r them/ see the finer construction, the p/us features, '■'. 
" the finer panels, the finer cases. You'll thank us ' 

for the suggestion! ;i 




This new ^;«, 






"■eans i„..j:^;t-- _ cu..en, consun^;!:: :^^-' '" .ens,„v 



esler sets 
'eadmas ,; "^ ""9^= lor An '^^'^""3^ on ranaJl , P^' vol,) 

9 -nge o, ,es,s. see V """"■ ^end coupon" ^."^ "^"'^^ - 
'^odel S50 (20,000 oh^ ''' "^"■ 



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SIMPSON 






..■(Sold on d«f|iii|ljHiSii|ii 



THIS COUPON BRINGS DETAILS 

|l Simpson Electric Co., 5216 W. Kinzie St., Chicago 

|| Send lads covering Q No. 250 D No. 220 

Name 

Address 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 

.J 



April, 1937 



71 



EVERYBODY'S GOlNG... Don't mis sitn 



bJ&~ 



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LSjw 



aSS^as 



Bll^NAL RADIO miK T^^;r"*« 

*•— ".SEL^ENs^JL^fllf SHOW 



d}^/ww^(2mt(^^Ta7mu 



' ''m s mmmm 

^w ^3 iSm. SS Sb ~89~ " I S 



rp nn ifu^ 



I will 



,tt. 



' jBS!B8I,J 

Conducted by Radio Parts JManufactiirers National Trade Show — Endorsed by Radio Manu- 
facturers Association and the Sales Managers Club. 



GO TO THE SHOW, by all means! It will pay you to see this huge exhibition 
of radio's latest developments. 

In connection with the show, RADIO TODAY is publishing a big DOUBLE 
NUMBER — the June Issue — containing manufacturers' 1938 announcements, 
up-to-date set specifications and complete reports of the show — all in one issue, 
for ready reference and file purposes. 



If you are not yet a subscriber to RADIO 
TODAY, here is a good reason why you 
should become one at once: 

With your one-year subscription at ONE 
DOLLAR (or 3 years for $2) you will re- 
ceive, absolutely free, a copy of the 1937-1938 
Radio Year Book, giving you 1,000 pages of 
merchandising and servicing data, including 
20,000 facts. 



But, you must act quickly. The edition is 
limited and the ofifer may be withdrawn at 
any time. 

If entered now, your subscription will start 
at once and will include the big double num- 
ber in June, as well as the new edition of the 
Radio Year Book. And yet you pay only $1 
per year for the magazine itself! 



USE THE POST CARD HERE WITH — MAIL IT AT ONCE 




BUSINESS REPLY CARD 

First Class Permit No. 22273 (Sec. 510 P. L. & R.) New York, N. Y 



RADIO TODAY 

480 LEXINGTON AVENUE 

NEW YORK, N. Y 




Send me RADIO TODAY for the period indicated below: 

[J 1 Year (12 issues) $1.00 Q Send bill 

Q 3 Years (36 issues) $2.00 Q Amount enclosed 



Nome 



Title or Occupation 



Company 
Street __ 



City 



Sfafe 



Oar Mala Line of Bostness Is: 



If RADIO TODAY li to be mailed to your heme, fill In address here 




Type 

AMPLIFIER 




• 20 Watts output 

• Dual mike input 

• Electric Eye Monitor 

Modern in appearance and 

performance 

A complete line of sound systems 

for every application illustrated 

in U.S.E.'s new 16-pa9e catalog. 

Write for new catalog No. J07 

and proposition 

United Sound 
Engineering Company 

Manufacturers of Electronic Equipment 

2227 UNIVERSITY AVENUE 

St. Paul, Minn. 

Licensed by arrangement with E. R.P.I, 
under patents owned and controlled by 
A. T. & T. and Western Elec. Co., Inc. 



FITS 

LOOKS 

WORKS 



Rights 




• Alake no mistake about it; there's 
nothing- to equal an AEROA OV Ev- 
nct-Duplicate lieplaceuient conden- 
ser! 

• Restores any set to original NEW 
status. And that's ^vhat fussy trade 
expects. 

• Vou save time, bother and real 
money when you use AEROVOX ex- 
act duplicates. 

Free DATA Latest AEROVOX catalog 

contains several pages of exact duplicate condensers. 
Copy sent on request. 



EKOVm 




CORPORATION 

) Washington St : : Brooklyn. N. Y. 



NEW BOOKLETS 



* Complete line of wet and dry 
electrolytic, and paper exact replace- 
ment condensers is listed in a new 
catalog offered by Solar Mfg. Corp. 
Motor starting replacements are in- 
cluded; booklet is available either 
from jobbers or from Solar head- 
quarters at 599 Broadway, New 
York City. 

*• Literature listing the Precision 
Apparatus Corp.'s Instruments, re- 
cently announced as available on a 
time payment plan, may be secured 
by writing to the company at 821 
E. New York Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

* Quam-Nichols Co., Cottage 
Grove and 33rd Place, Chicago, has 
issued new bulletins No. 52 and 53, 
describing respectively a new series 
of speakers with interchangeable 
transformers, and a new group of 
permanent magnet dynamic speakers. 

* New folder on 5-point sum- 
mer air conditioning has been re- 
leased by Climax Machinery Co., In- 
dianapolis, Ind. Item has a place 
for the dealer's imprint. 

■*■ Elaborate folder on replace- 
ment vibrators has been issued by 
Utah Radio Products Co., 820 Or- 
leans St., Chicago. 

* Eight-page, highly illustrated 
bulletin on Globe radio batteries is 
available from Globe-Union, Inc., 
900 E. Keefe Ave., Milwaukee, Wis. 

* Obtainable through National 
Union jobbers is a new 16-page vest 
pocket edition of a booklet, "Your 
Pocketbook — What About It?" Be- 
sides information on tube profits, the 
volume includes handy data not con- 
cerned with radio. 

■*■ Ready to be sent on request 
is a new Industrial Capacitor Re- 
placement Catalog, issued by Aero- 
vox Corp., 70 Washington St, Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. All types of capacitor- 
starting motors are listed, and the 
most popular items are cross-indexed. 

* For dealers and servicemen, 
the Radolek Co., 601 W Randolph 
St, Chicago, announces the release of 
their new Fall and Winter 164- 
page Profit Guide. Booklet is pro- 
fusely illustrated, lists "everything 
in radio." 

* Allied Radio Corp., 833 W. 
Jackson Blvd., Chicago, will send 
free on request its new 156-page 
Spring 19 37 catalog. Of interest to 
dealers, servicemen, amateurs, ex- 
perimenters and sound specialists, it 
lists complete merchandise for those 
groups. 

* Ready for distribution to 
dealers and jobbers is a new general 
public address catalog issued by 
United Sound Engineering Co., St. 
Paul, Minn. This 16-page booklet, 
No. 10 7, Is specially designed to sim- 
plify figuring of sound installations. I 




EVERY JOBBER 

WILL 

WANT 

THE 

NEW 

SERIES 

OF 

OuAM DYNAMICS 

"Radio's Favorite Voice" — with sensa- 
tional advances in design, quality, 
craftsmanship and tone. 

Interchangeable transformers 
Standardized voice coil impedances 
Armored field coils 
Completely dust-proofed 
Attractively packaged 
5 to 12 in. 3.5 to 12 watts 
Write or wire for bulletin No. 52 & 53 

Licenced under QUdM Patents 

QUAM-NICHOLS CO. 

CHICAGO — 33rd Place & Cottage Grove Avenue 
NEW YORK, N. Y.— 1674 Broadway 




New Revised 

RADOLEK 

Profit Guide 

1000 New 
Radio Items 



The Spring and Summer edition of the 1937 
Radolek Profit Guide is just off the press. The 
most up-to-date and complete Radio Supply Book. 
1000 NEW ITEMS— MANY PRESENTED EX- 
CLUSIVELY — an Oscilloscope using a new 2" 
Cathode Ray Tube, automatic tuning auto radios, 
etc. 164 pages of valuable, detailed radio buying 
information . . . contains the most complete re- 
placement parts listings of volume controls, con- 
densers, transformers, and vibrators. OVER 12,000 
REPAIR PARTS— THE RIGHT REPLACEMENT 
ITEMS FOR EVERY RADIO THAT YOU WILL 
BE CALLED UPON TO SERVICE. A complete 
new selection of Radios and P. A. Sound Ampli- 
fiers. Every page of this catalog will bring extra 
profits to you. Radolek Quality is guaranteed — 
Radolek Prices are right — Radolek Service is fast- 
est and most reliable. This is your Profit Guide 
— it's FREE. Send for your copy NOW! 

r"a~d"o~l~e~k' 

601 W. RANDOLPH. CHICAGO, DEPT. D-6 
Send me tlie Radolek Radio ProSt Guide FREE. 

Name 

Addiess 

yei\ iceman? Q Dealer? Q Experimenter? Q 



April, 1937 



73 



MAKE 




MILLION 

TEST INSTRUMENTS 

MODEL TV, shown above, with brilliantly 
illuminated meter, combines the features 
of our finest tube tester and analyzer. All 
measurements are made using built-in power 
supply, giving voltages oi 0-30-300-900 at 5000 
ohms per volt and resistance readings to 15 
megohms. 

Neon test lamp in calibrated circmt shows 
shorts and leaks, up to 6 megohms, between 
elements with tube HOT. Finds cause of poor 
sensitivity and selectivity; oscillator instabiUty, 
etc. — seldom shown on other testers. 

OTHER FEATURES 
Continuous line voltage adjustment — current 
ranges from 300 microamperes to 9 amperes — 
Direct reading by-pass condenser scale, .01 to 
3MF — Large 3-in. square D'Arsonval meter 
with GOOD-BAD scale — Tests emission of 
all tubes ; electrolytics for polarity and leak- 
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test circuits — Meets all requirements of port- 
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If your jobber cannot supply you order direct, 
giving name of your jobber. 

Million Radio and Television 
Laboratories 

397 West Superior St. Chicago. Ilk 



ON THE TRADE TICKER 



Introducing the 

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* Walter J. Baumaii, veteran 
radio man, has been appointed sales 
manager of the Ai-iston Manufactur- 
ing Coi-p. of Chicago, manufacturer 
of speakers and condensers. Wallie, 
as he is known throughout the trade, 
was previously identified with Cros- 
ley. United Reproducer Corp., 
Bremer-TuUy and most recently with 
Radio Speakers, Inc. 



■* New vice-pres. and general 
sales manager for Gemloid Corp. and 
its affiliated divisions is Philip Rich- 
land. General offices are at 42 5 
Fourth Ave., New York; president 
is J. Frank. 



* Taylor Tubes, Inc., 2 341-43 
Wabansia Ave., Chicago, have re- 
ceived notice from the Federal Com- 
munications Commission that Tay- 
lor tubes have been approved and 
given power ratings for use in broad- 
cast transmitters. The ratings are 
for both high level modulation or 
plate modulation and low level mod- 
ulation operating as linear power 
amplifiers. 

* Just-made-public report for 
the year 1936 on the net income of 
the St«wai't-Wamer Corp. and its 

subsidiaries shows the figure to be 
at the highest level since 192 9. Net 
for 1936 was $2,113,234, compared 
with 1,724,313 for 1935. 

* Late last month Leon L. Adel- 
man, sales manager for Comell-Du- 
bilier, began a record-breaking trip 
on which he expects to cover 15,000 
miles of his territory in 7 weeks. By 
May 16th, Mr. Adelman will have 
visited CD jobbers in nearly 4 8 
states, stopping at 3 5 principal cities 
and covering 12,000 miles by plane. 

■*■ Manufacturers representative 
N. A. Patchin, 212 North 4th St., 
Albuquerque, N. M., is covering 
Arizona and New Mexico for Pioneer 
Gen-E-Motor Corp. That firm is 
now featuring a new line of Red Top 
gas-electric plants. 

•k Walter "Irish" O'Halloran, 

GE radio salesman, won a gold 
watch at a recent meeting of the 
Chicago Sales Executives Club, in a 

contest designed to test a salesman's 
ability outside his regular line. 

* Freed Traiist'oitner Co., 100 

Sixth Ave., New York City, have 
moved their coil factory and engi- 
neering labs to larger quarters at 
9702 150th St., Jamaica, L. I., New 
York. Main office, shipping and as- 
sembly headquarters remain at the 
first address. 

* John S. Meek has announced 
his resignation as general sales man- 
ager of Clough-Brengle Co., Chicago. 
He will work on the formation of a 
new corporation, to engage in the 
making of radio precision test ap- 
paratus. 



* New weekly program for the 
radio amateur started April 3 at 12 
midnight on WMAQ, Chicago NBC 
station. Series is called "200 Meters 
and Down," is sponsored by Wm. J. 
Halligan, president of HaUicrafters, 
Inc., makers of communication re- 
ceivers. At the conclusion of each 
broadcast, remarks by Lt. Comdr. 
R. H. G. Mathews, W9ZN, central 
division director of the ARRL, will 
be featured. 



* New radio service department 
has just been organized by the 
Stromberg-Carlson Telephone Mfg. 
Co., Rochester, N. Y. This division 
of the company is entirely separate 
from factory routine and will hike 
delivery and service schedules. New 
department will be under the direc- 
tion of Charles E. Angle, and will be 
staffed by shifts from the sales and 
factory divisions of the company. 

Department will handle repair 
parts orders, customer repairs, in- 
quiries concerning radio troubles, 
merchandising and promotion of 
Stromberg-Carlson repair parts and 
the issuance of engineering data 
sheets, repair parts catalogs, and a 
bulletin "Solder Nuggets" which is 
issued frequently and contains serv- 
ice hints. 



NEW. . . 

Over ^S^OOO Items! 

The CATALOG you 
have been ^vaiting for 



"C'VERY manufacturer, lab- 
"^ oratory man and amateur 
experimenter will have steady 
use for the splendid new cata- 
log we are now bringing off 
the press. It lists hundreds and 
hundreds of items which we 
ourselves MANUFACTURE 
... for this is not a wholesale 
house but a comprehensive 
producing unit that designs 
and makes what it advertises. 
Steel, copper, brass, bakelite, 
composition . . . from a tiny 
lug to a complete installation. 
Get on our list for the new 
catalog! 



rnertcan 

RADIO HARD^VARE CO. 

Inc. 
476 Broadway !Vew York City 



74 



Radio Today 



J Jn^MjtmJu 



THE CHOICE 
OF SERVICEMEN 

BECAUSE 
THEY ARE USED 
BY LEADING SET 
IVTANUFACTURERS 



TRIAD 

MANUFACTURING 

COMPANY, Inc. 

Pawtucket, Rhode Island 

The Quality Name in RadioTubes 




Profitable! 



• CLAROSTAT KxHct Duplicate Con- 
trols, Resistors and Ballasts save 
time, trouble, uioiiey^ kickbacks. 

it Fit in place. Function correctly. 
Look the part. A real servicing job. 

•k Restore any set to original factory 
status. Satisfies the set owner. 

■k Most extensiA'e listings of sets and 
replacements eliminate all guess^vork. 

See Us at I.R.E. Show or at Na- 
tional Parts Show. Meanwhile, 
write for free Guide and Catalog. 



CLAROSTAT 

.VvVi,- MAXIJFAiCTIjIH.'Vfi CO. 



N > 2U5 IVorth Sixlli Si. 
y-^ Ilrooklvn, jX. >'. 




H. W. BlakesKe, named by Zenith to 
head promotion on parts and access. 

TECHNICAL MEETINGS AT 
I. R. S. M. CONVENTION 

■*■ Lectures for the forthcoming 
I.R.S.M. Convention, June 10 to 13, 
will be of a more varied type than 
the Institute has ever arranged be- 
fore. Technical lectures on timely 
subjects, clinics, and similar sessions 
will be supplemented by inspirational 
talks delivered by men whose names 
have made radio. 

Among those who will appear on 
the Convention program are E. T. 
Ciinniiig'hani, Pres. of RCA Mfg. Co.; 
O. H. Caldwell, former Radio Com- 
missioner and now Editor of RADIO 
TODAY; Robert Herzog, Editor of 
SERVICE; Harold Olsen, of Weston; 
Walter Jones, of Hygrade-Sylvania. 

Keeping pace with developments 
in the electronic art and in response 
to repeated inquiries from service- 
men, arrangements have been made 
for a discussion of the use of radio 
frequency in intercommunicating sys- 
tems for offices and homes. The 
speaker on this subject will be either 
Herbert H. Frost, head of the Frost- 
Minton Corn., or Fi-ank Hayes, his 
Chief Engineer. 

It is planned also to devote an 
evening to a "Set Clinic" to allow 
technical representatives of the set 
manufacturers to explain in an in- 
formal manner the engineering and 
service aspects of their apparatus. 
Clinics on test apparatus and public 
address are also being planned. 

■*• At the April 1st meeting of 
the Emporium, Pa., section of the 
Institute of Radio Engineers, speak- 
er was R. H. Langley, well known 
radio consulting engineer. Subject 
was "Some Studies of Magnetic Ma- 
terials at High Frequencies." 

* George Non'is, veteran rep- 
resentative in Seattle, Wash., for 
Triumph Mfg. Co., has been re-ap- 
pointed to represent the firm in lin- 
ing up new distributors. Triumph 
has branches out from the contract 
buyer and export business; increased 
production facilities now permit 
sales through distributors and parts 
jobbers. 




Model 600 Model 500 

SHORT WAVE CONVERTERS 
FOR CAR RADIOS 

Can be attached to any car radio. Has on and off 
switch. Does not aCFect the reception on the stand- 
ard broadcast bands. MODEL 600 — covers 49. 31, 
25, 20, 19 and 16 meter bands. Designed for re- 
ception of American and Foreign short wave broad- 
cast. Especially adapted to use in tropical countries 
and the more remote parts of the world. Distance 
range 5000 to 10000 miles. A very attractive unit. 

List Price $24.95 

MODEL 300 — covers 6000 to 20000 kilocycles. 
Has variable condenser with illuminated diaL 
List Price $19.95 

For Use of Police and Other Law 
diforcenient Oliieers 

MODEL 100 — police converter with fixed condenser. 
Covers 1500 to 2600 kilocycles. List Price $1 1,95 
MODEL 200 — police converter with variable con- 
denser and illuminated dial. Covers 1500 to 5500 

kilocycles. List Price $17.95 

MODEL 400 — police converter with fixed conden- 
sers. Covers 5 to 10 meters. Also adapted for usr 

of amateurs. List Price $ 1 3.95 

MODEL 500 — police converter with two metal 
tubes, variable condenser and illuminated dial. 
Very sensitive. Exceptional distance range. List 

?rice $21.95 

ALL WAVE ANTENNAS — Model B— under car and 
Model C— Fish Pole Type. List Price $5.00 

JOBBERS AND DEALERS WANTED 

ABC RADIO LABORATORIES 

33.14 N. IVew .lersey Street 
Iiifliniiapoli.s, liiflinna, U. S. A. 




1 his low-priced "Salt-Shaker" mike 
is a winner! Bell Telephone Labora- 
tories designed it for broadcasting 
and public address. 

It's both directional and non-direc- 
tional — assures regular Western 
Electric quality at a new low price! 

Distributed by GRAYBAR Electric Co. 
In Canada: iSorthern Electric Co., Ltd. 

GRAYBAR ELECTRIC CO., RT-4-37 

Graybar BIdg., New York. 

PleaBe send bulletin describing the new WeBtern 
Electric 633A microphone. 

yame 

Addrens 

City State --- 



April, 1937 



75 




CERTAINLY! 

Phonograph Records 
Played Faultlessly 
Pays Set Makers 

f^ ET the performance that puts 
^^ pep in radio-phonograph sales. 
Install General Industries FLYER 
motors, for smooth, even playing. 
Silent induction type, self-starting 
motor with reserve po^ver for abso- 
lutely uniform speed, regardless of 
record drag and weight of pickup. 
Laminated bakelite gears, self- 
inclosed. Tunning in oil, and long 
oversize bearings, insure silence and 
long motor life. 

Order a test motor NOW^. Avail- 
able for AC, DC, or universal AC-DC. 
Be sure to specify frequency and 
voltage you use. 

2fcGENEMAL InBUSIMES CO. 

3738 TAYLOR ST., EI/YRIA, OHIO 




COMUN-A-PHONE 

A 7<iew^ Instant, Two^Way 

System That Is Flexible 

and Efficient, 

COMUN-A-PHOXE is a superior qual- 
ity inter-offlce communicating sys- 
tem. A special feature is the buzzer 
and light system showing which sta- 
tion is calling. 

Comun-A-Phone gives yon instant 
communication plus PRIVACY. Merely 
Hip a sw^iteh and speak back and forth. 

The list price is §39.50 for master 
station and $10 for each remote station. 

For exclusive distributor rights and 
details write 

Standard Sound Products Co. 

55 WEST 42nd ST., NEW YORK, N. Y. 



TRADE FLASHES 

SALES MANAGERS CLUB, 
CHICAGO, JUNE 11 

* Ralph Hill of Ohmite Mfg. 
Co., and Charles Golenpaul of the 
Aerovox Corp., chairmen of the 
Western and Eastern divisions of 
the Sales Managers Club, respec- 
tively, were in conference in New 
York in preparation for the 1937 
Chicago Convention of the Sales 
Managers Club, to be held during 
the National Trade Show at the 
Stevens Hotel in Chicago in June. 
The Convention will open at 10 a.m., 
Friday, June 11, and it is anticipated 
that there will be the highest per- 
centage of attendance ever recorded 
for a meeting of the Club. 

Organized more than two years 
ago, the Sales Managers Club has 
attacked many of the problems of 
the parts manufacturers, and has had 
remarkable success in their solution. 
Twice each year the Eastern and 
Western divisions have held com- 
bined meetings concurrent with the 
Chicago and New York Trade Shows. 
Now that the Trade Show is under 
the management of the Radio Parts 
Manufacturers National Trade Show, 
the formation of which was of con- 
siderable interest to the Sales Man- 
agers Club, the meeting activities 
are to be broadened into a conven- 
tion. 

Kenneth C. Prince, a Chicago at- 
torney and executive secretary of the 
Western division of the Sales Man- 
agers Club, will discuss some of the 
recent legislation and its import 
from the standpoint of the members 
of the Club. 

TWELVE BLOTTERS 

* Series of 12 hi-colored blot- 
ters with photographs of big-time 
radio stars on them has been issued 
by National Union. Suggestion is 
that they be released by service- 
dealers to customers at regular in- 
tervals, imprinted with the dealer's 
name and address. They are to be 
had through NU jobbers at a mod- 
erate charge. 

SLANTED DISPLAY 

* Finished in 4 colors, a col- 
lapsible all-metal stand is offered by 
GE to aid salesmen in demonstrat- 
ing auto radios. Item is designed to 
feature safety tuning, has a com- 
partment at the base for the battery. 
It comes assembled with necessary 
holes punched, accommodates tvo 
models. 

FIRST PRIZE, A TRUCK 

* The big contest sponsored by 
Raytheon Production Corp. for radio 
dealers and servicemen will continue 
to May 1st. Contest entries are to be 
had from Raytheon jobbers: first prize 
among the 500 awards is a service 
truck with a complete sound system, 
and other items to be given away in- 
clude service instruments, radios, can- 
did cameras, etc. 




Robert L. Barr, the new general sales 
manager for Clough-Brengle, Chicago. 

AUTO RADIO SALES AID 

* Phllco has issued a new series 
of sales helps for those plugging 
auto radio, spring and summer style. 
Material includes bill-board posters, 
streamers for store windows and 
dealers' trucks, two types of display 
boards, a 4-page tabloid newspaper 
carrying the dealer's imprint, fold- 
ers, a recently announced booklet, 
"Official Baseball Facts," and a 
series of 8 dealer advertising mats. 



NOKOIL 
SPEAKERS 

Make the Perfect 
TALK-BAK* Systems 

5" Special 

Talk-Bak* 

Speaker 

JloJel 4S2TB 




Only $4-^^ Li 



St 



The 5" model shown above is the 
most popular, but these speakers 
which are designed especially for 
Talk-Bak* Systems can be had in 
other sizes. 

Write for general catalog, 
special information and draw- 
ings on Talk-Bak* Systems. 

Ask for the name of our nearest 
distributor. Wright-DeCoster dis- 
tributors are always anxious to co- 
operate. 

WRIGHT -DeCOSTER, INC. 

2265 University Avenue, St. Paul, Minnesota 
Export Dept.: M. Simons & Son Co., New Yorh 

Cable Address: "Simontrice" 

Canadian Office: Associated Sales Co., Guelph, Ont. 

■•'Copyrighted 



76 



Radio Today 



• INDEX • 
TO ADVERTISEMENTS 



page 

ABC RADIO LABORATORIES 75 

AEROVOX CORP 73 

AMERICAN RADIO HARDWARE CO 74 

AMPERITE CO 45 

ANSLEY RADIO CORP 4S 

ARCTURUS RADIO TUBE CO 66 

ATLAS SOUND CORP 60 

CENTRALAB 56 

CINAUDAGRAPH CORP 57 

CLARION RADIO, INC 1 

CLAROSTAT MFG. CO.. INC 75 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 4.5 

COMMERCIAL CREDIT CORP 6 

COMMERCIAL INVESTMENT TRUST CORP. 23. 24 

CONTINENTAL CARBON. INC 70 

CORNELL-DUBILIER CORP 58 

CROSLEY RADIO CORP 69 

CROWE NAME PLATE & MFG. CO 63 

DICTOGRAPH PRODUCTS CO.. INC 21 

ELECTRONIC PRODUCTS SPECIALTIES CO.. 58 
EMERSON RADIO & PHONOGRAPH CORP... 3 

FADA RADIO & ELECTRIC CO 7 

FEDERAL SALES CO 64 

GALVIN MFG. CORP Cover IV 

GENERAL ELECTRIC CO Cover III 

GENERAL INDUSTRIES CO., THE 76 

HYGRADE SYLVANIA CORP 52 

INTERNATIONAL RESISTANCE CO 47 

ISOLANTITE, INC 35 

J. F. D. MANUFACTURING CO 63 

KATO ENGINEERING CO 48 

KEN-RAD TUBE & LAMP CORP 54 

MILLION RADIO & TELEVISION LABS 74 

MUTER CO 51 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING CO Cover II 

NOBLITT-SPARKS INDUSTRIES, INC 29 

ONAN & SONS, D. W 78 

OPERADIO MFG. CO 43 

PARRIS-DUNN CORP 64,65 

PHILCO RADIO & TELEVISION CORP 8 

PIERCE-AIRO, INC 50 

PIONEER GEN-E-MOTOR CORP 50 

QUAM-NICHOLS CO 73 

RADIO CORP. OF AMERICA 40.41 

RADIOTECHNIC LABORATORY, THE 60 

RADOLEK 73 

RAYTHEON PRODUCTION CORP 37 

RCA MFG. CO., RADIOTRON DIV 2 

RCA MFG. CO., RCA-VICTOR DIV 22 

RIDER, JOHN F 70 

SIMPSON ELECTRIC CO 71 

SOLAR MANUFACTURING CORP 77 

SONORA ELECTRIC PHONOGRAPH CO.. INC. 50 

SPARKS-WITHINGTON CO 67 

STANDARD SOUND PRODUCTS CO 76 

STANDARD TRANSFORMER CORP 70 

STAR MACHINE MANUFACTURERS. INC... 65 

THORDARSON ELEC. MFG. CO 59 

TRIAD MANUFACTURING CO.. INC 75 

TRIPLETT ELECTRICAL INSTRUMENT CO... 61 

TRIUMPH MFG. CO 55 

UNITED SOUND ENGINEERING CO 73 

UTAH RADIO PRODUCTS CO 59 

WARD LEONARD ELECTRIC CO 60 

WARD PRODUCTS CORP 74 

WEBSTER-CHICAGO 39 

WESTERN ELECTRIC CO 75 

WHITE DENTAL MFG. CO., S. S 62 

WHOLESALE RADIO SERVICE CO 78 

WINCHARGER CORP 33 

WRIGHT-DeCOSTER, INC 76 

ZENITH RADIO CORP 31 



While every precaution is taken to insure accu- 
racy, we cannot guarantee against the possibility 
of an occasional change or omission in the prepa- 
ration of this index. 



Solar 

DOMINO 




molded BAKELITE paper capacitors 





April, 1937 



77 




Complete 
Electric Plants 



ONAN ALTERNATING CURRENT 
GENERATING PLANTS furnish the 
same electricity as city power lines. Made 
in sizes 3 50 to 10,000 watts to meet the re- 
quirements of those who must provide their 
own electricity for Farms, Summer Camps, 
Cottages, Boats, Commercial Purposes. 

OPERATE A. C. RADIO 
These A. C Plants operate RADIO, 
HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES, WATER 
PUMP, MOTORS — anything that nor- 
mally would operate from city lines. Will 
run Public Address Systems, Demonstrating 
Car Equipment, Talking Moving Pictures, 
X-Ray. 

MODERN CONSTRUCTION 
ONAN PLANT Engines are like the Motor 
Car, Truck or Tractor Engines. Operate 
on Gasoline, Gas or Distillate, Wiring and 
Installation is the same as for standard ap- 
plications. Also 32 volt, Direct Currem 
Models. Write for Details 

D. W. ONAN & SONS 



572 Rovalsl-^n Ave. 



Minneapolis, Minn. 



. . . Lafayette 

WILL HELP YOU 
GET A PROFITABLE 
SHARE OF IT! 



r. /\. is Big Business todayl LAFAYETTE 
answers this fact with CO-ORDINATED 
SOUND SYSTEMS— completely assembled 
— pre-tested — easy to install — ready for instant 
and faultless operation. Priced right, they offer 
a system for every conceivable P.A. application. 

Send for FREE 116 page catalog now 

listing in detail all LAFAYETTE CO-ORDI- 
NATED SOUND SYSTEMS and component 
parts. MAIL COUPON NOW! 




WHOLESALE RADIO SERVICE CO., Inc. 
100 Sixth Avenue, New York, N. Y 

Rush FREE catalog No. 68-12D7G 




1 




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'^M 






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gn 


-^BRpm 


m 


mx,. 


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u 


*^ 



C. T. Wandres, ad. manager of G E Radio, talks over the new 
complete GE tube line with H. A. Crossland, tube sales manager. 



City.. 



FREE!! 



TRADE FLASHES 



•k Announced by Oarostat Mfg. 
Co., Inc., Brooklyn, N. Y., is a new 
sales representative for New Eng- 
land area: Harry Gerber, 49 Port- 
land St., Boston, Mass. 

* Huge new music store, West- 
chester Piano Co., has been estab- 
lished at 524 North Ave., New Ro- 
chelle, N. Y. Proprietors A. F. Olsen 
and J. J. Burggraf plan to enlarge 
and develop the radio department, 
under the direction of any suitable 
radio expert who is seeking a mu- 
tually profitable arrangement. 

* New radio store, Eveready 
Radio Sei-vice, Inc., has been opened 
by Jack Davis at 135 E. 57th St., 
New York City. Davis has a record 
department, is active in sound work. 
Radio lines stocked include Emer- 
son, GE, Philco, Westinghouse, 
Stromberg-Carlson, Zenith, Air-King, 
RCA and DeWald. 

* C. J. Stevens, Des Moines, la., 
has been named district manager 
for Crosley Radio Corp. in Iowa, 
Illinois and Nebraska. 

* A group of Chicago capitalists 
has purchased the internationally 
known radio trade-name Clarion 
and has started to manufacture a 
complete line of radio sets bearing 
this well known name. Clarion 
Coiijoration will have executive of- 
fices in the Pure Oil Building, Chi- 
cago. R. B. Lacey, capable and pop- 
ular radio executive, becomes vice- 
president and general manager and 
announces company will manufac- 
ture home, automoble and farm 
radios, to be sold only through whole- 
sale distributors on a restricted dis- 
tributor's territorial basis, with Clar- 
ion automobile radios as the first 
product available for the trade. 



"Bob" Lacey has been identified with 
radio merchandising for many years, 
having been for the past five years 
general sales manager of the Wilcox- 
Gay Corp., and previously for a num- 
ber of years general sales manager 
of the Ferryman Tube Corp. 

■* M. Lehman, president of Leh- 
man Radio Salon, Inc., 1013 Madison 
Ave., New York City, has received a 
letter from the famous orchestra 
leader, Leo Reisman. Letter speaks 
of Port-O-Matic, the Lehman prod- 
uct: "Of all the machines I have 
ever owned, I find that this one re- 
produces sound most accurately." 
Mr. Lehman pioneered the portable 
automatic phonograph - radio com- 
bination. 

* Further expansion on the part 
of the American Zinc Products Co., 
Inc., Greencastle, Ind., is the open- 
ing of a new Chicago oflBce at 43 E. 
Ohio St. All sales activity in the 
Chicago area will be handled 
through the new office under the 
direction of F. Clifford Estey, vet- 
eran district manager. 

* Radio division of GE has an- 
nounced the opening of a new fac- 
tory branch at 1321 S. Washington 
St., Peoria, 111. 

*■ E. F. Johnson Co., Waseca, 
Minn., makers of radio transmitting 
parts, are now occupying a new fac- 
tory and oflice building which will 
triple available space. Personnel 
has been hiked and equipment added. 
L. W. Olander, formerly an RCA en- 
gineer and at one time with the Bell 
Telephone Labs, is the new chief 
engineer for the Johnson firm. 

* One of the state universities of 
the Middle West recently conducted 
a series of tests of recording ap- 
paratus and equipment. Experimen- 
ters took products from 6 U.S. manu- 
facturers; Universal Microphone Co., 
Inglewood, Cal., was notified that it 
had won first place with its products. 



78 



(Index to advertisements on page 77) 



Radio Today 



THE FASTEST WAY TO 
SALES AND PROFITS 

IS WITH GENERAL ELECTRICS AUTO RADIO 

AFC 

AUTOMATIC FREQUENCY CONTROL 




EQUIPPED 



FOR 



"FLICK • • • There's Your Station" 

It's a hot sales feature ... a real contribution 
to the DRIVE SAFELY Campaign. The driver 
merely turns the dial to approximately the sta- 
tion's dial position . . . and "PRESTO!" . . . the 
program comes in instantly. No dial rocking 
necessary to find the station's correctly tuned 
position. 

"CUSTOM-BUILT" INSTRUMENT 
PANEL CONTROLS FOR ALL CARS 




ZJetif/"^^ 



Stations hair-lined tuned ... At a fliclc of the dial! 
Eyes concentrated on the rogd while driving and tuning! 

You con really "go to town ' this year with GENERAL ELECTRICS 
AUTO RADIO MERCHANDISING PACKAGE. See the assortment of 
FOUR new 1937 G-E AUTO RADIO MODELS, £lus a big kit of 
SALES PROMOTION SELLING AIDS, £lus a sensible plan on 
custom-built instrument panel mounting plates. It contains every- 
thing you need to speed up sales and profits. 

As/c Your G-E Radio Distributor For Full Details. 

FOUR G-E AUTO ANTENNAS DESIGNED 
FOR ALL TYPES OF CAR INSTALLATIONS 



MODEL FA-61 

Six Metal Tubes. 6^- 
inch Speaker. An- 
tenna Circuit-match- 
ing System. 




MODEL FA-60 

Six Metal Tubes. 6^- 
inch Speaker. An- 
tenna Circuit-match- 
ing System. 




GENERA 



MODEL FA-80 

Eigtit Metal Tubes. AFC. Compensating AVC. Class "B" 
Amplification. Antenna Circuit Matching System. 3- 
point Tone Control. 7 V/atts Output. 6 1/2-incti Built- 
in Electrodynomic Speaker 



^^y^i 




ELECTRIC 



APPLIANCE AND MERCHANDISE DEPARTMENT, GENERAL 
ECTRIC COMPANY, BRIDGEPORT, CONNECTICUTj 



DEALERS SAY IT'S AMERICA'S 
FASTEST SELLING AUTO RADIO 

HENEwiirnysTINATOR 



WITH THE NEW 




Model "65" ACOUSTINATOR EQUIPPED 

LOW BATTERY DRAIN 

6 Tubes— 8" Electro Dynamic Speaker 

List, $49.95 



MOTOROLA \^ 
"TQPPER" AERIAL^ 



Here's today's greatest auto radio feature! Motorists 
all over the country are insisting on it! The ACOUS- 
TINATOR actually SELLS Motorola! Sensationally 
new, the ACOUSTINATOR is easily and convinc- 
ingly demonstrated. Be wise ... tie up with Motorola 
and tie into big profits from quick sales. Write today! 



NO CITY STA 



tsi 




NO STREET C 



MOTOROLA FEATURES UuU kelp, ,fc^ 6eU! 



Acoustinator Personal Preference Selector 
Permanent Magnet Dynamic Speakers 
Ortho-Acoustic Separate Speakers . 
Exactly Matches Dash of All Cars 
??"Adapto" Broad Range Antenna System 
^j,Reversible-Phase "Magic Eliminode" 
% Low Battery Drain 




BALANCED MUSIC 




8' Permanent Magnet Dynamic Speakei 

LOW BATTERY DRAIN 

ACOUSTINATOR EQUIPPED 

List, $69.SO 



MODEL "3S" THE CHALLENGER 

NEW LOW PRICE— BIG VALUE 

6 Tubes— 3-Gang Tuning Condenser 

List, $29.95 



Model"45"REMARKABLE PERFORMANCE 

6 Tubes-6' Electro Dynamic Speaker 

Local-Distance Switch and Tone Control 

List, $39.95 



nent Magnet Dynamic Speaker 
LOW BATTERY DRAIN 
ACOUSTINATOR EQUIPPED 

List, $54.95 



GALVIN MFG. CORPORATION 

847 WEST HARRISO N STREET, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



▲ 



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▲ 



•*■*;♦■,''.' ' 









"-S^ '' 











"t-Sr^f^V,.! 




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SHOE -LEATHER -the A 

Summer Sales, see page 13. Mi 




National 

Broadcasting 

Company 

A Radio Corporation of America Service 



IDDLING with the dials while the 
prospect burns is often fatal to the 
sale. Note how surely an outstanding 
radio dealer dials a station. And note his 
unerring choice of a program — one that 
charms the customer and meets his mood, 
exactly. This dealer doesn't get submerged 
in price discussions or competitive chat- 
ter. He knows NBC stations and pro- 
grams, right around the clock! He sizes 
up a prospect and lets an NBC program 
help put the sale across. His demonstra- 
tions are on a par with both sets and 
programs, and better set sales prove it! 




THE RADIO THAT 
MADE SALES HISTORY 



• One year ago Fada announced the addition of 
"Coloradio" to their regular radio line. This an- 
nouncement created no stir among the dealers be- 
cause of previous unprofitable experiences with 
color. Little did they realize at that time that while 
color in radio was not new, "Coloradio" by Fada 
was decidedly new . . . new in the application of 
color . . . new in standards of performance . . . new 
in comparison of value. 

• At the first showing of "Coloradio" far seeing 
radio dealers realized at once the amazing sales pos- 
sibilities this new line offered. The gleaming mod- 
ernistic cabinets of Bakelite and Beetle in Black, 
Walnut, Ivory and Chinese Red adorned with Gold 
and Chromium metal were glorious to behold. 
Fada had added another great contribution to the 
radio industry. 



• The appeal of color is universal ... it arouses the 
deepest emotions in both old and young ... it has 
greater sales appeal because color is the dominant 
trend ... it had performance appeal because "Col- 
oradio" offered a new standard of excellence in 
performance ... it had price appeal because no 
other small set line offered so much for so little. 
Fada had taken the small set radio out of the doldrums 
of monotony and gave it a new lease on life. 

• Wherever it was displayed consumers likewise 
caught the allure of "Coloradio" as created by 
Fada. Sales skyrocketed to new highs . . . dealers 
were literally swamped by the demand . . . pro- 
duction was speeded up . . . extra molds were made 
. . . extra floor space added . . . extra labor employed 
to maintain production schedules with the increas- 
ind demand. The success of "Coloradio" was as- 
sured . . . Fada had given the radio industry another 
great sales stimulant. 



The new "Coloradio" series for 1938 will soon be announced ... it 
will Far outstrip its predecessor in beauty oF design, perFormance and value. 
It will Feature AC, AC-DC and Battery Operated radios For the Farm. It will 
oFFer the dealer greater sales possibilities than any other small set line. Re- 
gardless oF the number oF lines a dealer may Feature he cannot aFFord to ig- 
nore the addition oF "Coloradio" ... the biggest small set line For 1938. 



The Tsjew Fada Line for 1938 Will Include a Well Balanced Presentation of Compacts, 
Table 'Models and Consoles of Distinctive Designs in beautiful Contrasting V/oods and 

featured in Every Price Range 

• • 

FADA RADIO & ELECTRIC COMPANY, LONG ISLAND CITY, N. Y. 



RADIO TODAY, May, 1937. Vol. Ill, No. 5, published monthly by Caldwell-Clements, Inc., 480 Lexington Ave., New York, N. Y. Subscription 
yearly SI. 00 in U. S. and Latin American countries; $1.25 in Canada; $2.00 all other countries; single copy, 15c. Entered as second-class matter July 
24, 1936, at the post office at New York, N. Y., under the Act of March 3, 1879. Printed in U. S. A. Copyright 1937 by Caldwell-Clements, Inc. 



(Index to Advertisements on page 71) 



■^m. 



m^ 




Turret 
Shielding 

Introduced by Fairbanks-Morse, 
Turret Shielding has been an 
important factor in closing more 
sales per customer for Fairbanks- 
Morse dealers. Visual value—- 
demonstrable performance- 
gets results. 



Tone 
Projector 

Another development by 
Fairbanks-Morse engineers. Like 
turret shielding, Tone Projector 
combines ''eye-appeal" with 
apparent value. It also turns 
"shoppers" into buyers with 
less sales effort. 




FAIRBANKS^ 



WiW'A\' '^^•■'^*Jl>■'f••?' vl5>. ' 



SINCE 1830 the name Fairbanks-Morse has stood for consistent quality and value. 
The 1937 line of Fairbanks-Morse Radio receivers upheld this tradition in every 
respect. This fact will be attested to by the men who sold them, and what is possibly 
more important, by those who bought them. 

The new 1938 line will continue to uphold that tradition. It will retain, in improved 
form, both Turret Shielding and the Tone Projector, as important selling features. 

Our engineers have seen to it that this new line will incorporate other new and 
desirable features that contribute to better performance and greater salability, in 
models that fill every important price bracket. The Fairbanks-Morse 1938 line leaves 
nothing to be desired in the way of selling features. 

And there is a complete new farm line in 2- and 6- volt models that will rival the 
new AC line in beauty and performance. 

There's plenty of profit to be made by Fairbanks-Morse Radio dealers — always 
will be — for we believe in protecting the dealer's investment for him. Why not see 
what this could mean to you, in your territory? 

Your Fairbanks-Morse distributor is now attending the 1938 Radio Convention 
at the factory in Indianapolis, where these new models are being made, tested, and 
shipped to every part of the globe. He is in position to give you the whole story. 

The deal is all "aboveboard," contains no red tape, mandatory requirements, or 
heavy financial investment. It will take only a few minutes to get the whole story — 
send in the coupon now. 

1 




FAIRBANKS, MORSE & CO. 
Home Appliance Division 
2060 Northwestern Ave. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 

Please send me complete information about the 1938 line of 
F-M Radios and the dealer franchise. 



Name. . . 
Address. 
City 



. State . 



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